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Keeping a Level Head

stretch your confidence

How do you keep a level head when all about you are losing theirs?

Some children find it easy to navigate the web of school and friendships, family life and personal development. But for those who are struggling, and even as a guide for those who already have a level head, two activity books publishing this autumn lead the reader through a series of activities to foster self-confidence and growth mindset: Find Your Power and Stretch Your Confidence by Beth Cox and Natalie Costa, illustrated by Vicky Barker.

In fact, some of the nudged behaviours inside are often those suggested to adults undergoing CBT therapy. Resilience, self-confidence, problem-solving, can all be taught – they are all behaviours that we can learn to harness and use in our everyday lives. These books for 6-9 years provide activities and ideas to start learning those mindsets early.

find your power

Find Your Power explores a child’s emotions, and looks at how children perceive their value in the world. The first pages look at how children see themselves, from simple things such as name and place within the family, to understanding about ‘wonder’ generally and the world around them, and then applying that sense of wonder and exploration to one’s self. There is problem-solving with mind maps; understanding the strength of one’s brain with new challenges; being kind; and understanding feelings…and much more.

Tools for sleeping well and calmness abound in Find Your Power, but Stretch Your Confidence helps a young person to overcome nerves and identify strengths. There’s understanding about friendships, emotions and grit and resilience, each page using activities from brainstorming to step-planning.

Each book is highly illustrated with lots of colour, is simple to follow, and yet requires thought – which changing one’s mindset automatically does.

The authors are well-schooled in their topics. Beth Cox is the co-founder of Inclusive Minds and Everybody In, promoting diversity within her industry of book publishing. Natalie Costa is the founder of Power Thoughts, a body empowering children to tap into the power of their minds. She has worked in education for over 10 years.

To test the ease of use of the activities, I undertook a task from Stretch Your Confidence. Sometimes a situation can make me feel nervous, or I can feel anxious about something and that anxiety can take over all other thoughts. To combat this, finding a simple distraction is often a way out – it leads the mind to start thinking about something else and the overwhelming anxiety dissipates – it becomes a worry that is fleeting instead of remaining.

The page suggests some ideas for distracting yourself – in a crowd or at an event you might want to count all the people wearing glasses, or find five things that you can see, four you can touch, three you can hear etc.

The book then suggests writing an action plan for one’s own distractions when feeling nervous or anxious. There are twelve lines to fill in.

My list is below. The first few I use when I’m in a crowded place or party. The next few are for when anxious feelings are dominating my headspace. Here are some of my ideas:

  1. Sing a song in your head to which you know the lyrics (this is particularly good whilst at the dentist)
  2. Think of the next meal you’re going to eat (although this may result in just making you feel very hungry!)
  3. Come up with a plan for a kind activity to surprise a friend
  4. Count the lightbulbs in the room
  5. Prepare something interesting to say in conversation
  6. Start thinking about how you would report on the event later
  7. Go for a run/take exercise
  8. Take a friend/child/dog on a walk and look closely at nature
  9. Do some gardening (nature is particularly helpful to soothe a worried mind)
  10. Bake a cake or cook a meal (following a recipe is a good distraction)
  11. Listen to an interesting podcast
  12. READ A BOOK

At the end of the page, the book asks the reader to think about a time in which something went well, and recall how it felt. This is an excellent exercise to promote memory recall, and can flood the mind with positive emotions.

You can buy Find Your Power here, and Stretch Your Confidence here.  With thanks to b small publishers for my advance copies.

Book of the Week

The Wonders of Nature by Ben Hoare, illustrated by Angela Rizza and Daniel Long

wonders of natureThis summer I came across the sacred Datura wildflower. A poisonous perennial, it has hallucinogenic properties, the Zion park ranger told me. What’s more, it blooms at night, starting early evening and typically closing around noon, and has features that are iridescent in UV light, but hidden from human sight.

Wildlife journalist, Ben Hoare, in his latest children’s book for Dorling Kindersley, doesn’t cover hallucinogens thankfully, but does open the readers’ eyes to a host of wonders, in sections of the book neatly separated into  rocks and minerals, microorganisms, plant life and animal life.

Carefully curated to sample the spread of wonders in the natural world, the rocks and minerals section highlights key examples from hard to soft; the animal section picks a variety from simple organisms to complex animals. At first, the choice of minerals and species may seem random, but closer inspection shows Hoare attempting to showcase vastly different features and strengths across the natural world.

Aimed at a young child, age 7+, Hoare’s text reads simply but is imbued with enthusiasm and creativity. Each entry has two descriptive paragraphs and although they do give the essential facts on the item – Hoare detailing that the Iris grows from a bulb – he makes smart analogies too: comparing the lines or dots on petals to landing lights on an airport runway, giving insects a pathway into the nectar. He also branches out into myth and story – in Ancient Greece, Iris was the goddess of rainbows.

This flair for interest and creativity extends to each entry, even on the snail. A pull-out quote on this page points to the fact that a snail has ‘not one, but several tiny brains’, bringing out the author’s sense of humour. On living stones, which thrive in a desert habitat, Hoare points out that desert creatures such as tortoises often miss this source of food, as the plants are only easy to spot after rain falls.

A mix of photograph and illustration, the design of the book serves the purpose of ‘wonder’ well. In the plant section, there is often up-close photography of a flower or leaf, and an illustration of the entry at a distance, to give the reader the impression of the shape of the entire tree or plant. Zoomed in, some plant leaves can look like artworks themselves; Traveller’s tree resembling a psychedelic poster, although there are no hallucinogens here.

When the design pushes through to meet the text, the reader knows they are onto a winner. Nowhere in the book is this more blatant that the spread on the Ghost plant. This double page entry is faded to a ghostly grey, both in photograph and illustration, with a droopy look, definitely looking less than lively. But the text zings with life – this fascinating plant is almost transparent, and Hoare explains how it doesn’t need photosynthesis (explained and phonetically spelled out), using a mix of exclamation and questions to get his point across. The pulled-out fact tells the reader not to pick the plant because it turns black.

At first glance, this may seem like a book with little text on each full page picture. But reading it not only gives the reader knowledge, it inspires true wonder at the natural world.

For me, books are exquisite items in themselves. But as if to emphasises the point of the wonder of the natural world, the production of this book has been handled with a sense of elegance too – gold edges to the pages, a tough hardback with a gold foiled cover. A fantastic stand-alone title, but also a great companion to its sister title An Anthology of Intriguing Animals. You can buy The Wonders of Nature by Ben Hoare, published by DK here.

With thanks to DK for the review copy. The book is available at £20.00