Alphabets: A Guest Blog by Allan Sanders

alphabet of alphabetsCertain picture books stand out in the library as being favourites for free-reading time. They happen to all have something in common – their interactive ‘search and find’ functions. Where’s Wally, You Choose – any book that invites the reader to look carefully for something, count it, or make a decision, provokes discussion and sustained reading.

Search-And-Find Alphabet of Alphabets by Allan Sanders is new, fresh and exciting, and lends itself both to pictorial and wordplay; sometimes the alphabetised pages feature both a picture search and a word search. The illustrations are cartoon-like, with a nod to Scheffler in the anthropomorphic animals, and the vocabulary is stretching – this is not for babies, with words such as numbat, kinetoscope, hieroglyphics and limousine. Good for honing observation skills, and of course, for logophiles.

Below, Allan Sanders explains how he came to make the book, and how he managed to cheat a little with the difficult letters, but mainly, for MinervaReads, how he designed the letter M.

Amanda Wood and Mike Jolley are the brains behind The Alphabet of Alphabets. When they approached me with the idea for the book, I knew immediately it would be a great project. Mandy and Mike have made some great books together, so I jumped at the chance to work with them and Wide Eyed Editions.

The idea for The Alphabet of Alphabets is quite simple – 26 illustrated alphabets from A-Z.  A is for Alphabet, B is for Birds, C is for Creepy-crawlies, and so on. Within each alphabet there’s a whole other alphabet of things to find. On D is for Dinosaurs there is an A to Z of dinosaurs from Apatosaurus to Zuniceratops. On I for Inventions, you have to find everything from an Abacus to a Zeppelin. With 26 different alphabets, our book has got over 600 words to find!

The first stage in making an alphabet for each letter was to agree on a theme. For M we we came up with Machines, Music, Monsters, Mythology, or an alphabet of Moustaches! After some discussion we agreed that M for Museum would be the best fit. Museums are full of lots of very interesting things so it was an obvious choice. We knew it would offer a wide range of words to learn, and also lots of cools things to draw. In our museum you have to find everything from a suit of Armour to a Ziggurat.

As we worked on each alphabet, we found that it was a challenge to come up with things for certain letters – Q, Z, X & U are particularly tricky.  If we couldn’t think of anything for the letter U, we would be a bit cheeky and have underpants as the thing to find!  Even if we did have a letter U, we decided to include underpants in the picture anyway!

In the Museum you have to find the Urn, but there is also a pair of underpants in a glass case. I imagine that these underpants must have huge historical significance! They could have been the underpants worn by the first man in space, or underpants worn by the first president of the United States of America. Or perhaps, they are prehistoric underpants and they belonged to a Neanderthal man. We left it up to the reader to decide who they belong to!

I hope kids will enjoy finding all of the things in the Museum. Once they have found everything on the list they can try and find more things in the picture. Often there is more than one thing beginning with each letter. Once they have exhausted the book (it will take some time!) they could think about the different alphabets around them. You could come up with an alphabet for where you live, or an alphabet of your favourite foods, or an alphabet of all the countries in the world. You can have a lot of fun thinking about alphabets!

In the book you’ll find an alphabet of hats, a toy shop alphabet, an alphabet in space and an alphabet of yellow things! For the letter V we made a vehicles alphabet, a whole A-Z of crazy vehicles to find. I really like drawing cars so this picture was one of my favourites. Alongside the more traditional modes of transport we managed to squeeze in some unexpected things: a vampire driving a hearse, a nun on a skateboard, a yellow submarine and a heavy metal rock band in a pink limousine!

The most difficult alphabet to complete was W for things to Wear.  We came up with the idea of a character wearing 26 alphabetical items of clothing – all at the same time! That doesn’t sound like such a big deal but you should try wearing that many items of clothing whilst retaining any kind of fashion sense. Things can get pretty silly, pretty fast…

The Alphabet of Alphabets is the 10th non-fiction title that I’ve worked on. I feel that I have learnt a lot from all the books that I have illustrated, but with 26 alphabets to draw this was definitely the biggest project I’ve ever done. It was a real pleasure to work with Mandy & Mike and the lovely team at Wide Eyed Editions. I hope we can make another book together soon.

The Alphabet of Alphabets, created by Mike Jolley and Amanda Wood and illustrated by Allan Sanders, is published by Wide Eyed Editions, and you can buy it here. Check our Allan’s instagram to see fun animations associated with the book: omnibus and boats.

Allan Sanders studied at Manchester University and the Royal College of Art. Over the last 15 years Allan has worked on animations for the FIFA World Cup website, illustrations for French road safety agency Sécuritié Routière, animations and posters for the Oregon Humane Society’s ‘End Petlessness’ campaign, children’s books including Perfectly Perilous Math, Little Explorers and How Machines Work, and editorial projects for magazines & newspapers worldwide including The New Yorker and The Economist.  Allan lives in Brighton. For more information about Allan visit his website.





Book of the Week

The Mystery of the Golden Wonderflower by Benjamin Flouw

golden wonderflowerI’m constantly bamboozled when I read a great English novel and discover that the author has named the plants that the protagonist brushes past in her garden, or the genus of trees that the antagonist climbs to launch his ambush. At my primary school we occasionally went on a ‘nature’ walk, but I gathered little more than conkers and pine cones. Now, my children can’t identify different leaves or wildflowers, they falter at nature – and this is despite having a house rich in books and traversing a field every morning to get to school (we do live in urban London though). The Lost Words helped enormously with this last year, but now, in British Science Week, (9th to 18th March), a simple picture book has caught my eye, published in Germany, translated from the French, and now on our own shores.

The Golden Wonderflower introduces Fox, a botanist, who realises that there’s a picture missing in one of his botany books. No one has yet drawn this rare precious plant called the Wonderflower, so Fox sets off on a long journey to find it.


Not only does Fox experience the most delightful journey, wandering through woodland – illustrated with light and dark, tall trees and a faint mist that feels so real that the reader can almost breathe the sweet air themselves, but also he recognises the plants along the way, and demonstrates his knowledge to the reader. Hence, every few pages of the story, Fox shows us the names and details of the plants – a pine leaf, tree and cone, all illustrated and labelled. A spruce, a beech, an oak and so on.

golden wonderflower inside

There are friends too, a bear fishing (with a rod), cousin Wolf who likes his food, and a marmot who points the Fox in the right direction up the mountain. Here, Flouw illustrates the different levels of the mountainside, in a landscape that highlights the different fields of crops, and the array of trees, which subtly change shape as he traverses up the mountain.

When the reader, and Fox, finally encounter the flower, the production team behind the book have done a beautiful job, for it is truly gaspworthy (using more than a little foiling – it shines). Fox knows not to pick it, for it is rare, so he sketches it instead, showing the reader the names of the different sections of a flower.

The illustrations are reminiscent of Jon Klassen in tone, although slightly more angular, and the colours reflective of the landscape – yellow, brown, green and orange hues in the woodland, blues and purples higher up the mountain, and of course, an abundance of green, particularly at Fox’s lush and verdant house.

Flouw also uses colour to delineate the time of day, and it’s the sunset at the top of the mountain that’s particularly magnificent, with colour sweeping across the page giving an atmospheric peace to the spread, and using the play of shadow to enormous effect.

The book aims to indicate the pleasure of a nature walk, the beauty of observing the natural world, but also points to conservation, as Fox realises how wrong it would be to pick this wonder flower. Instead he leaves it where and how it was – this is where it is most beautiful.

This book, conversely, should be picked up and leafed through, time and time again. It’s a wonder itself.

You can buy it here. Please note the book may be called The Golden Glow in the US.