An Interview with Tatum Flynn, author of The D’Evil Diaries

The Devil Diaries TatumFlynn (2)

Tatum Flynn is darn witty on twitter. I always feel that twitter users should be witty – the word wit is in the name – but Tatum and her avatar stand out in particular. And then I noticed that she’d written a book for children too – with a deeply compelling title, The D’Evil Diaries, and I knew I had to read it. The book has an intriguing premise – it is set in Hell, features the Devil himself, which is fairly subversive for a children’s book aimed at the 9 yrs+ audience, and even contains conversations between the Devil and God. I realised this was one debut children’s author whom I had to interview. I first asked Tatum if she had set out to do something different by writing her rather rebellious yet highly inventive novel.
I’m not sure if​ any writer sets out to write something different on purpose, we just all *are* different, we all have uniquely odd internal universes. Writers just let the cat out of the bag by putting those internal universes onto the page. I simply set out to write a story that would entertain me, with an eye to eleven-year-old me, and that story happened to be a funny version of Hell because that type of subversion and unlikely juxtaposition is the kind of thing that tickles me.
In the novel there are two very likeable and well depicted children – Jinx, the son of the Devil, and Tommy, a dead child who seems to be in Hell by mistake. Is Tatum more of a Jinx or a Tommy?
All my characters have a bit of me in them – I think they have to, to come alive – but honestly the character that I most identify with is Loiter. [Jinx’s pet sloth] I would happily spend most of my days lounging in a hammock drinking margaritas and reading Calvin and Hobbes. But if I had to choose between Jinx and Tommy, I’d say I was more like Tommy as a kid – I didn’t have her talents for gymnastics or knife-throwing, but I was pretty bouncy and chatty and a crackshot with a pistol.”
Devil Diary illustration2
Pistols aside, there’s some wacky stuff in the book, with superb action scenes from a carousel where evil horses come to life, to woods with dead witches hanging from trees. Above all, there is oodles of humour, and not just common slapstick, but witty intellectual humour, which is so refreshing and wonderful to read in a children’s book:
Humour doesn’t necessarily come naturally to me. Sometimes it does, but sometimes I go back and say, Hmm, this chapter isn’t funny enough, let’s have someone fall on a hellhound and squish them. But that’s the joy of writing – it’s easier to be funny when you have time to think about it! Esprit d’escalier and all that. Humour generally, though, is super important to me. Laughter is the physical manifestation of joy, there should be more of it around. It’s one of the reasons I write kid’s books, because there’s far more humour in them than adult books. Humour is also a great way to take pretention down a peg or two, or mock terrible things happening in the world. I think humour keeps the human race sane, and that’s not an exaggeration.”
Tatum’s book is funny, but also controversial, as Tatum features God as a character in The D’evil Diaries. I wanted to know if she’d hesitated before including Him, as I imagine there may have been consternation among some publishers:
Yes, a little, though probably not for the reasons you might think – I mean, once you set a kid’​s book in Hell you’ve already pushed all your chips in the middle.”
Tatum’s chips reference brings her past as a professional poker player into play. Maybe this helped her look at things from different points of view in the book as well. It is written in first person, from Jinx’s point of view, but Tatum also has scenes between God and Lucifer.
I was unsure about having too many different points of view.​ The first section from His point of view was something I wrote early on, but I took it out. Then I was encouraged by various people to enlarge the Lucifer sections and interstitials, so I put it back in. One of my favourite lines in the book is ‘God was in his pyjamas’, so I’m glad He crept back in, plus I’m fond of the dynamic between Him and Lucifer, where the King of Hell reverts to being a sulky teenager around his Father.”
Devil Diary illustration
I stopped short of asking Tatum about her religion but did venture to query her opinion on the existence of Heaven and Hell:
The epigraph at the beginning of my sequel is:
‘The mind is its own place, and in itself can make a heaven of hell, a hell of heaven.’​
​from Paradise Lost​. That’s the type of heaven and hell I absolutely think exists. I’ll leave the possible existence of other types to the theologians.”
Something that particularly tickled me in the book was Tatum’s imaginative use of chapter titles from chapter 10 ‘Blah Blah Secret Plots Blah Blah’ to chapter 11 ‘Library Cards at Dawn’ but also her references to songs, chapter 14 ‘If You Go Down to the Woods Today’ to chapter 23 ‘Just Another Brick in the Wall’. Which song would Tatum prefer of the two?
Woods, definitely, I always think there’s something slightly deliciously creepy about the teddy bears’ picnic…
Lastly, I asked Tatum which book in the world she wished she had written. Jokingly, she replied…”the new one I’ve just started,” but then proceeded to tell me her favourite influences:
Molesworth, the Addams Family, Tankgirl, Calvin and Hobbes – but I couldn’t have written (or drawn, interesting how they’re all illustrated) those anyway. I’m just glad that they’re out in the world for me to be inspired by. I think most people become writers because the book they want to read doesn’t exist, at least that was partly ​the case with me. So I think the book I wish I had written is one of my own that’s yet to come, one that will be as near to perfect as I can clumsily make it.”
Self-deprecating, witty and clearly talented, I’m delighted to have interviewed Tatum Flynn about her debut children’s book. I’m sure I’ll be talking to her in years to come about how much more she’s achieved.

You can purchase The D’Evil Diaries here and find out more about Tatum Flynn here, including her vagabond past of piloting lifeboats in Venezuela, shooting rapids in the Grand Canyon and almost falling out of a plane over Scotland.

 

 

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