Beetles, Other Creatures and Conservation

For some children, their way into reading is not through love of story but rather through a particular interest, such as beetles, creatures or conservation. I recently had a client who was concerned about her son’s reading and begged me to find books on turtles – it was the only way in. For other children, their concern for their own future and the future of the planet is a key concern and although watching David Attenborough is fascinating and game changing – so is reading a book that teaches about conservation. My headline book this week is borne out of a fiction trilogy, although it very firmly sticks to the facts.

beetle collectorsThe Beetle Collector’s Handbook by MG Leonard, illustrated by Carim Nahaboo
This is an excellent extension of a make-believe world, yet despite the fictional author named in the front and the Beetle Boy characters’ printed scrawlings in the margins, the book is above all a bonafide non-fiction book on beetles, comprehensively written by Leonard and fact checked by leading experts. For those unaware, the Beetle Boy trilogy is a great adventure story about Darkus Cuttle, in which beetles play a large role. This book, The Beetle Collector’s Handbook, is referenced within the text as a key non-fiction handbook, and now Leonard has created her fictional reference as a real book.

Not only does it give further insight into the Beetle Boy characters with their margin annotations, but it gives detailed information on a selection of beetles, complete with annotated illustrations and rather wonderful tables and records of species. The illustrations show the actual size of some of the beetles, and the text supplies facts in a friendly, non-patronising and welcoming way.

The author’s voice comes through loudly and clearly, not only in her (or his, if you go with the fictional author Monty G Leonard) explanation that this is a book for both genders, but also in her instructionals on how to catch, study, but mainly respect these insects. As one would expect from someone who views beetles as insect superheroes with their own costumes and skills, the book is enormous fun, and genuinely encourages the reader to seek out beetles – which luckily for most means simply going to a local garden or park, in which at least fifty different species live apparently. This is an inspirational book, but also highly researched, so that a child will come away with scintillating knowledge but also enthusiasm and enjoyment. The book is packaged in a chapter-book style to sit neatly on the shelf next to the fiction trilogy (if you so desire), but also with a nod to the fiction behind it – it’s hardback with foil embossed cover and pages inside that are tinted so that it feels ‘old’. Clever, attractive and necessary. Like beetles themselves. Add it to your collection here.

survivalSurvival by Louise McNaught and Anna Claybourne, and produced in association with Tusk, is a phenomenal visual warning about the plight of some of the planet’s endangered and vulnerable animals. Some of the artwork in the book is taken from Louise McNaught’s art show, also called Survival, and features the creatures’ energy – some are so stark they seem almost like photographs – but are hand painted with incredible detail. What’s more the animals are fading into or rather out of a bright background, so the image of the tiger looks as though the animal is emerging from the green foliage, at the same time as perhaps being gradually faded out by an invisibility cloak – or rather the threat of extinction.

The book showcases each visual with a reference page that highlights the status of the animal (The Siberian Tiger is endangered) as well as giving key facts about population, Latin name, habitat and location in a small box. A paragraph of text gives context and illuminates the history but also conservation of the animal (action being taken to protect them), and their importance on Earth.

The artwork in the book is breathtaking – quite inspirational. If you hadn’t already worried about the future of the Hawksbill Turtle, you will after seeing its vulnerability portrayed with the upward drips of paint around its vivid, striking body. Age 7+ years. You can buy it here.

turtles, snakes and other reptiles
Turtles! When I spoke to that aforementioned client, there were only a few books around that met her son’s need. Now, there are more and more. I’d start with Turtles, Snakes and other Reptiles by Alice Pattullo and Amy-Jane Beer. This pocket guide with high production quality gives a comprehensive look at all things reptile, despite being quite pocket-sized for a non-fiction title. Full colour illustrations throughout, and mentions for lesser-well known species make this an excellent guide to reptiles. Each creature is given an introductory paragraph but also panels including ‘A Closer Look’ and ‘Did you know’, Latin names and captions and annotations. For the older amongst us, some of the small text is hard to read against the dark coloured backgrounds, but for its readership, this is a fascinating and worthwhile little series, in conjunction with Britain’s Natural History Museum. Age 7+ years. You can buy it here.

hello world animals

Three titles for younger children with an initial emerging interest in animals and seeking further understanding include Hello World: Animals by Nicola Edwards, illustrated by L’Atelier Cartographik. This companion piece to Hello World by Jonathan Litton is a novelty lift-the-flap title that explores the wonder and richness of the world around us. The book divides into the different continents, with maps overlaid by small images of animals, which when lifted give the name and a brief sentence. Brevity is of the essence here. I did enjoy the longer explanation as to where the European wilderness has gone, as well as the oddities of the Galapagos. The book features over 180 animals, pointing out when some are endangered, how some of them feed, and an interesting range of other facts – a good primer for primary school geography and exploration of the life sciences, and great for kids who like to dip into books to glean regurgitate-able facts. Age 7-9 years. You can buy it here.

There’s a Rang Tan in my Bedroom is actually a 90 second animated film narrated by Emma Thompson, but Greenpeace have released an accompanying book, which tells the rhyming story of a baby orang-utan who is homeless because of deforestation – the clearing of natural habitat to make way for palm tree oil cultivation. Sadly, although they sent me a copy, I can’t find one for you to buy, but you can watch the video here.

peek and seek
For a proper book, complete with flaps, full colour illustrations, and interactivity, little ones will like Peek and Seek by Charlotte Milner. At first appearance the spreads look empty – a landscape of houses, inhabitants silhouetted, and a tide of colourful trees behind. When the reader lifts the flap, a flock of birds and information appear as if by magic. The information describes roosting, group epithets, and migration, all on a hardy board book background. Further spreads include wolves, ants (although alliteration has won out over factual accuracy on this spread – using army rather than colony), fish, monkeys and rabbits: an eclectic mix with no apparent reason. There are also charts with things to find in the illustrations – a nice engaging bit of interactivity. A shame to find a spelling error on a key word in the factfile, but perhaps it will be picked up on reprinting. A gentle introduction for exploring eyes. Age 4+. You can buy it here.