Butterflies for the Big Butterfly Count

Ever since The Very Hungry Caterpillar, and probably even before, primary school children have been enthralled with the life cycle of the butterfly. Who could fail to be inspired by the miracle of nature that turns a wormy looking caterpillar into a beautifully coloured flying insect?

the butterfly houseKaty Flint and Alice Pattulo have captured some of the butterfly wonder in their non-fiction book, The Butterfly House.

By creating a narrative around an imaginary butterfly house, which encompasses species from all sorts of habitats – mountains, rainforests, deserts, meadows and more, the author illustrator team invite the reader to actively participate in their nonfiction adventure.

The book begins with a couple of introductory pages exploring how butterflies feed, the difference between moths and butterflies and of course, ‘the hatchery’. It then showcases families page by page, from brush-footed to swallowtails, metalmarks, and so on.

Each page has clearly labelled illustrated examples of species within each family, and an introductory paragraph with facts and identifying features to help the reader to recognise them.

The illustrations are exquisitely beautiful and detailed; they seem rather traditional, which makes sense for an illustrator who has worked for brands such as Crabtree and Evelyn and The V&A – the butterflies feel as carefully drawn as one would handle them.

The narrative is friendly as well as informative, resulting in the perfect non-fiction to pique interest on the subject. You can buy it here.

how to be a butterflyHow to be a Butterfly by Laura Knowles and Catell Ronca is aimed at an even younger audience, but neatly packs information about butterflies into a narrative that asks how we define them.

For example, to be a butterfly you need to have dazzlingly bold colours, and examples are provided, or subtle delicate colours – and then further examples are given. The book contains just a sentence or two on each page, but manages to explore the parts of the body, size, wings, camouflage, breeding and more, in a lyrical, poetic way.

Of course, in telling the text in this way, the author crafts a narrative that promotes diversity – there are many different ways to be a butterfly and all have value, giving a very subtle message about ourselves too.

Each page is set against a pale background, which feels airy and light and gives the colour wash of the butterflies plenty of contrast. These butterflies are painted rather than drawn as above, but equally well delineated, so that each shown species is clear in colour and pattern – and labelled too. You can buy it here.

Both books are well produced, support early years curriculum on mini-beasts and fit well with The Big Butterfly Count, taking place in the UK between 19 July and 11 August.