behaviour

Picture Books with A Message

Learning to Share

moonlight school

Owl Wants to Share at Moonlight School by Simon Puttock, illustrated by Ali Pye
Actually, there is much more to this book than a simple lesson about sharing – it’s about using your imagination, being kind to each other, and accepting difference. However it is not preachy at all. In fact I fell in love with Miss Moon, Moonlight School’s teacher, the most understanding teacher in literature since Miss Honey! Simon Puttock demonstrates his understanding of children’s behaviour within a classroom environment (even if they are animals here) with accuracy and skill, and Ali Pye’s phenomenal illustrations, capturing shadows, mannerisms, and expressions are a delight.

At drawing time, there aren’t enough night-time colours to go round, so after Cat, Mouse and Bat have helped themselves, Owl has to draw using bright daytime colours. What will he come up with, and will the other students learn about sharing in the process?

Silver glitter on the front, attention to detail inside (look for Mouse’s tail accessory and her body language as she puts her paw up), the clever use of perspective to stop the reader from seeing Owl’s picture before Owl is ready – there is so much to admire in this picture book.

The language too is pitched perfectly – “Owl looked clever and said nothing”, whilst Miss Moon is a shining example of every good primary school teacher, with positive reinforcement, classroom control, and of course giving out stickers at the end.

This is a sumptuous picture book. Recommended to all. Buy a copy here.

 

Owning Up

the whopper
The Whopper by Rebecca Ashdown
Perhaps slightly less subtle, The Whopper by Rebecca Ashdown is certainly comical. Percy’s grandma comes to stay, and as a gift she gives him a hand knitted jumper. Percy hates it of course, and decides to take her words literally when she says it is “just right for walking the dog in”. When the dog ruins the jumper, Percy tosses it away, but when he lies to his Mum about what happened to it, a little creature called the Whopper appears. Before long the Whopper has taken over Percy’s life, to the extent that the only way he can get rid of it is to admit the truth. He does so, and of course, Grandma shows her acceptance of his apology with a new gift!

There are some hysterical moments in this book – from the picture accompanying his lie to the baby brother’s and Percy’s classmates reaction to the whopper, and the whopper’s ultimate defeat!

The message is how a lie, no matter how small, can loom large and take over quite quickly, and it’s drawn with some relish here. Very enjoyable as a lesson in telling the truth, but not necessarily a go-to picture book for bedtime. You can purchase it here from Waterstones.

 

Trying New Things

bogtrotter
Bogtrotter by Margaret Wild, illustrated by Judith Rossell
Bogtrotter is a simple creature. Furry green, with keen eyes, lively hair and a toothy expression, he runs day after day, year after year around the bog – hence Bogtrotter! But he’s not entirely content. When the frog asks him why he doesn’t ever do anything new or different it sets in motion alarm bells, and Bogtrotter starts to take notice of the world around him, and think of possibilities for the future.

The frog’s second question makes him think even harder, and he goes on a full adventure, with surprising results – not spelled out for the reader in text, but inferred in the picture. It’s a gem of a title, exploring what can happen if a person goes outside their own comfort zone, and takes stock of other creatures and the surrounding landscape.

The illustrations are adorable – the sort of depiction of a creature that a child wants made into a soft toy, as well as endearing human touches for animal creatures – the Bogtrotter sleeps with a mug of tea beside him and pictures on his wall (presumably of himself). Even the illustrations from behind of him ‘trotting’ are quite something to behold. A great book, with humour, insight and inference. Highly recommended. Buy here from Waterstones.

 

Being Brave

brave as can be
Brave As Can Be: A Book of Courage by Jo Witek, illustrated by Christine Roussey
Another fairly unsubtle book, but so excellently produced that you’ll think seriously about buying this and referencing it over and over. Sturdy thick cardboard pages with die cut shapes cut out lend a special element to this dynamic book.

An adorable little girl depicted in black lines with red cheeks, red bow in her hair, and red spots on her dress, takes the reader through the book in first person narrative, recalling how when she was little she had many fears. Ironic of course, as the little girl is still pretty little. Firstly she introduces her huge mountain of scary things.

Two die cut eyes in the mountain turn it into a kind of monster, but on the next page those die cut holes turn into snowflakes – showing that our fears are simple shape shifters – we can choose to see things as scary or we can choose to view them as something other than that.

The little girl then goes through her fears one by one, but instead of dismissing them, she tells the reader how she dealt with them – from using a night-light in the scary dark, to her mum’s explanation that the dog’s bark is just him saying hello. She even points out that sometimes we use being scary as a way to entertain – such as Halloween and telling spooky stories.

The illustrations are very clever – not only using the die cut shapes on each page to turn into something fresh, but also the combination of pencil lines and colourful crayons, as if the little girl had drawn the illustrations very neatly – the tangle of adult legs with scary boots on the ends is very effective when the little girl describes getting lost. (She overcomes her fear by becoming a brave explorer).

I wasn’t convinced about the ending though, which I found to be a bit of a letdown, although perhaps it is apt for the target readership. Size is said to be important here. As the little girl grows up, she realises that fewer things seem scary. As she grows as a person, her fears diminish.

Certainly the things that were scary as children no longer seem scary…it’s just that for this reader, other stuff does. You can buy a copy of the book here.

Having a Bad Day?

I’m pretty much done with the toddler tantrums in my household, but I remember days of frustration with young children as if it were yesterday, and most parents would agree that there are still days in the life of a nursery and reception child where the terrible twos didn’t seem that long ago. I’ve found that an excellent way to combat a full meltdown is by holding up a mirror to a child’s behaviour. A few great picture books for children having difficult days are as follows (and older children can still benefit from the comfort these give, and as they get older recognise the embedded irony too)

PomPom gets the grumps

Published February 2015, Pom Pom Gets the Grumps by Sophy Henn is the most recent addition to our ‘behaviour’ books and leaps out from the bookshelves with its vibrant ka-pow cover. Pom Pom’s expression is immediately one of immense anger and disgruntlement all because one morning he got out of bed on the wrong side. Pom Pom is pictured in the first page with a cloud of grey rain over his head, which doesn’t lift for much of the book. Sophy Henn leads the reader through all the things that go wrong from losing his toy, to a soggy breakfast, to being irritated with his mother, all the way to Little Acorns playgroup/nursery. His nastiness to his friends results in his own-enforced isolation, and immediately his anger turns to regret and he reaches out to them again. I love the fact that Pom Pom realises his own mistake and says sorry, but I also love the twist at the end – children’s moods can swing so suddenly! The story itself is one that has been told before, but the illustrations are magnificent and universally appealing. The simplest lines indicate a brow crease frown, whether in profile or face on, and the friendly animals at the playgroup/nursery are adorable. One to be re-read for certain.

Big Shouty Day

I would recommend My Big Shouty Day by Rebecca Patterson to mothers sitting alone of an evening after a particularly tough day – the first illustration is enough to make the most frustrated parent crack a smile.
shouty dayinside

The book sums up beautifully the weariness of the parents, as well as the embarrassment felt when one’s child creates a fuss at the shops, on a play date, and even in the street. However, it’s also good for the child as the text becomes bigger and shoutier during the book, as the irrationality comes through, and the illustrations get funnier and funnier.
“Then it was time for my tea and my bath.
But those peas were
TOO HOT
And our bath was
TOO COLD”
Most children will recognise a tiny bit of themselves in it, as they see the simplicity in the overreactions of the child and her unreasonableness. The beautiful ‘sorry’ at bedtime, with the mother’s understanding, “we all have those days sometimes”, leading to a better day in the morning, is the perfect resolution to this Roald Dahl Funny Prize award winner.

Smile

Smile by Leigh Hodgkinson has a quirky design, not unlike Charlie and Lola books, with lots of font changes. Smile is about a small girl who has lost her smile (mainly, it seems, as a result of being told that she cannot have any more biscuits). She spends the day searching for it, asking her family where it might have gone. As she searches, she inadvertently does some good deeds round the house, and then when praised for her good behaviour, the smile returns. It’s a sweet story, and good for bringing a smile to a young reader’s face too. Mum’s and Dad’s solutions for finding lost things also managed to make this adult smile. The illustrations are simple and unconventional, and quite inspirational. This is one I have used with older children too to demonstrate how simple lines can create expression in a face, and that playing with text for emphasis is useful, from underlining to uppercase letters, to simple annotations – such as ‘splishy’ and ‘sploshy’ written in each of the puddles when it rains. A book brimming with imagination.

Olive and the Bad Mood

The illustration on the front of Olive and the Bad Mood by Tor Freeman is reminiscent of so many loony tunes cartoons, and raises a smile before we even start.
“Olive was in a bad mood.
This was not a good day.”
As in My Big Shouty Day, and Pom Pom Gets the Grumps, I liked that there was no reason behind Olive’s bad mood, it was just there. Younger children find it hard to articulate what it is exactly that has made them grumpy or sad. And for older children, it’s okay that sometimes mood changes without a definitive reason. However, in a new twist, Olive’s bad mood rubs off on all the friends she meets, so that when she finally cheers up, she discovers that they are all in bad moods now, and it’s her job to cheer them up. The irony in the end is that she thinks she’s the cause of the cheering up, not the bad moods. This is a good jumping off point for discussion with children about what they do that affects others without them realising, and that it’s important to have self-awareness. What was interesting in both this and Smile, was that food was a big indicator in the mood swings, unfortunately a sad but true fact for many of today’s youngsters.

elephantantrum

Elephantantrum by Gillian Shields and Cally Johnson-Isaacs is a good example of animals teaching behaviorr in picture books. Ellie is a very spoilt little girl who has everything she wants, and one day she requests an elephant. It’s promptly delivered, but it turns out that this is not quite the elephant she wished for. Ellie’s elephant is extraordinary! It’s the ultimate look in the mirror for Ellie, as the elephant usurps her and wears her clothes, plays with her toys and friends, and finally has an enormous elephantantrum. The tantrum makes Ellie realise that her prior behaviour wasn’t very nice, and as in Olive and the Bad Mood above, it’s not nice for everyone else! It’s a satisfying book with a great message, and a lovely elephant.