empathy

Finding the Dugong Inside You: An Empathy Day post by Candy Gourlay

empathy dayEmpathy Day was founded in 2017 by not-for-profit Empathy Lab. This year it falls on 11 June. Using research that shows empathy is a skill we can learn, it aims to inspire and promote empathy.

And where better to start than with reading, particularly children’s books.

As founder Miranda McKearney OBE says: “Reading helps young minds to imagine lives beyond their own…Books are scientifically proven to help us develop empathy. 

This year, author Candy Gourlay has explained what empathy means to her for MinervaReads:

candy gourlay

Ten years ago my debut novel Tall Story was published. It is the story of two siblings who have never met, one in the Philippines and one in London,  separated by years of failed visa applications.

I filled Tall Story with Filipino characters, sewing Filipino folk tales and quirks into the narrative, including the national passion for basketball despite our diminutive stature.

I also infused Tall Story with loneliness – my loneliness: having left my family behind in the Philippines to start a new life in London, in the same way that my hero Bernardo is left behind when his mum becomes a nurse in London.

It is not a loneliness unique to me.  For the past 20 years, my country has been experiencing a migration phenomenon. Eleven percent of our population leave home every year to work abroad.

So imagine my surprise when my English husband’s uncle – a former Royal Marine – said that he felt Bernardo’s story was like his own.

Uncle Ian had spent most of his childhood at boarding school while his parents had worked overseas. Several times, when his parents had visited him at boarding school, he had changed so much they had failed to recognise him.

Uncle Ian had found echoes of himself in a left-behind Filipino boy.

Echoes

“Empathy is about finding echoes of another person in yourself.” the novelist Mohsin Hamid said, in an interview.

Hamid was talking about writing, not reading.

#ReadforEmpathy may be today’s hashtag … but it might as well be #WriteforEmpathy because to write a book that inspires empathy requires much empathy from the author herself.

is it a mermaid
The Dugong in Me

EmpathyLab, the empathy, literature and social action programme for four to 11 year olds, has compiled a Read for Empathy list of 45 diverse books for 2019.

This includes Is It a Mermaid?, written by me with achingly beautiful illustrations by Francesca Chessa, and nominated for the Kate Greenaway Medal.

Is It a Mermaid? is about a dugong (sea cow) who declares that she is a mermaid despite the objections of a little boy named Benji. When I read this aloud, the comedy of the situation has the children hooting and laughing. How can this fat, grey sea creature even begin to look like a mermaid?

But midway through the story, Benji goes too far and the dugong bursts into tears. As I read, I am always amazed by my audience’s reaction. The children’s faces become serious and sad as they realise that, like Benji, they have been unkind.

The moment never fails to move me. Because that dugong who thinks she is a mermaid? She is full of echoes of my own experiences:

That time when my sister and I were playing at fashion modelling and an aunt fell about laughing. “Oh she’ll never be a model, she’s too fat!”

That time I said I was trying to become a children’s author and an acquaintance laughed scornfully saying, “Not another one! Too many people think they can become authors!”

That time when I was left out of a game by some cousins, claiming, “Only boys can play this!”

Better People

“The more we read the more empathy we show to our fellow human beings,” the literary agent Jonny Geller declared in his TedxTalk What Makes a Bestseller?, citing research that makes a connection between fiction and increased empathy. “Reading makes us better people.”

The 11th of June is Empathy Day and book lovers (readers and makers alike) will be banding together to create a #ReadingforEmpathy sonic boom, with chat and book recommendations. Join us in showing how books can transform readers.

Reading makes us better people.  Let’s make it happen.

With thanks to Candy Gourlay for her guest post. To read my review of her latest novel, Bone Talk, click here. To buy Is It a Mermaid click here, and you can watch the book trailer here.

Be My Valentine

I’ve taken the liberty of focussing on love in general for my picture books on Valentine’s Day. That’s not to say I eschew romance – not at all! But working as a primary school librarian, Valentines are more likely passed from friend to friend or child to family member or even to pet, and this is what these three picture books celebrate.

the kissThe Kiss by Linda Sunderland, illustrated by Jessica Courtney-Tickle

In the so-called current trend for uplit (literature that’s uplifting for the soul), this picture book fits lovingly into the zeitgeist. Edwyn blows a kiss to his grandma, shown on the cover as a gold foil sprinkle of stars, like dandelion seeds released into the wind. Edwyn’s grandma shares her received kiss, almost as an act of kindness, bestowing it upon those who need it most, such as a sad old man and a cross mother. But then darkness descends in the shape of a man who steals it and wants to keep the kiss for himself, all locked up as an artefact in a cage. But this has devastating consequences for the kiss, for him, and also for the outside world. Luckily, he not only sees the error of his ways, but is granted swift forgiveness by the kind grandma, and all is resolved.

Courtney-Tickle illustrates the story with an emphasis on nature and the outdoors. Most of her large double page illustrations are populated with wildflowers, colourful leaves, animals and outdoor activities with a clear focus on weather – all emphasised by the choice of dancing leaves on the book’s endpapers. The colour is magical, reminiscent of David Litchfield, with an old-fashioned fairy tale quality, exemplified by marching bands, an abundance of Snow-White-esque wildlife, cold dark towers, a simplicity in the characters’ timeless outfits. And yet a modernity creeps in too – a wooden bin at the park, mobile phones, an abundance of balloons.

The book is about love shared, kindnesses spread, and the empathy needed to understand others. You can buy it here. 

mirabel's missing valentinesMirabel’s Missing Valentines by Janet Lawler, illustrated by Olivia Chin Mueller

More love shared in this whimsical picture book from the States, which really is about Valentine’s Day.

Mirabel, our shy and anxiety-ridden mouse, complete with large eyes, long whiskers and a penchant for hats, sets out for school to deliver her Valentine’s cards.

The reader is entreated to rhyming text to tell Mirabel’s story – the joy at creating the cards and the angst about delivering them – but it is only through ‘reading’ the pictures that we see the cards spill from her bag on her way to school. The recipients of the spilled cards (all strangers in the town) return them with smiles, touched by their heartfelt sincerity and the fleeting opportunity to see them, which makes them smile and gives them joy. The happiness she has inadvertently spread gives Mirabel the confidence to take them to school.

The illustrations are old-worldly, a cast of anthropomorphic animals fill the book, the buildings look as if they come from a playmobil playset. But if you’re after a picturebook about overcoming anxiety and shyness, and how kindness can spread, this may be one for you. Endearing. You can buy it here. 

rosie is my best friendRosie is My Best Friend by Ali Pye

A much more modern outlook in this fresh and zippy tale of friendship that relies heavily upon the reader’s visual understanding as well as narrative absorption. Rosie explores how she spends her day with her best friend – helping the adults around them, playing games, learning new tricks. There’s a delightful contradiction between the helpfulness Rosie and her friend think they are giving, and the actual consequence of some of their actions, and the illustrations not only reveal the truth but burst with friendliness, vibrancy and warmth themselves, from the stroll in the park with balloon seller, boating and games, to the make-believe play at home.

There is familiarity in this tale of an ‘everyday’, a comfort from the openness of the characters and the intense cuteness of both girl and dog. The twist at the end is both writerly and masterful – suggesting the reader thinks about point of view and perspective. Clever, witty, and completely adorable. Give it to your Valentine for Valentine’s here. 

 

Humans

January seems like a good time to address the different things that make us human, and to show the differences between us.

humans
Humans: The Wide World Awaits by Susan Martineau, illustrated by Vicky Barker
The award-winning team behind Real-life Mysteries have produced a new series called Geographics, which aims to show intriguing geographical facts with dynamic infographics design.

Geographics: Humans certainly is appealing. A thin book with a sturdy paperback cover, the book is bright and colourful throughout. It is quirky too, in that this isn’t just a fact book of information, but aims to provide guidance too.

There is typical geography information, such as on the page entitled ‘Where We Live’, and this shows the world at night with the lights indicating population, and shows the most populated cities, and the least, and the spread of humans around coastlines and in the Northern hemisphere. Following pages have information on water, resources, transportation, power and inventions, but there is also guidance on recycling and communication.

This is a wonderful first approach to human geography, which despite its small size, reaches further than most – using its vibrancy to illuminate facts and the author’s emotional intelligence to promote the idea of being a global citizen, understanding and caring for the planet on which we live. I’m proud to have absorbed the information within easily, and have learnt facts including: more people have a mobile phone than a toilet, and Papua New Guinea has 841 living languages. You can buy it here.

i am human
It’s not just our impact on the Earth but our impact on each other. I am Human: A Book of Empathy by Susan Verde, art by Peter H Reynolds aims to explore, through simple illustrations and text, the idea of who we are inside ourselves – a person who is always learning, with dreams and hopes, but also one who makes mistakes and feels pain and fear and sadness. The third part of the book aims to show the choices available – to be kind and fair, to forgive and move forward – in essence to show empathy. The book is about being the best human you can be, reminding children that they are unique at the same time as belonging to the human race, in which there is familiarity.

Reynolds’ line drawings bring to life this manual for living. The people are diverse and different, yet similar in their thin legs and neat noses. They feel vivacious and active, even when they are blue in both feeling and colour:  fear is represented as a huge ladder stretching to the unknown, sadness is a boy sitting on a ledge – followed swiftly by him standing, arms outstretched, hope on his face as he makes a new choice. There is a wonderful empathy that Reynolds delineates in his expression.

In it’s ability to showcase both self-worth and caring for others, this serves as a good guide in both home and school, for children and adults. You can buy it here.

when I was a child
When I was a Child by Andy Stanton and David Litchfield
is a picturebook that also uses colour wisely, bursting with a zest for nature and life, as it aims to show how humans can embrace the world around them. Ostensibly a book about a child aiming to show her grandmother that the world is still magical, and that wonder still exists, this is also an exploration of imagination and curiosity bearing a subtle environmental message. The grandmother believes that her world is now grey, but through the child’s eyes, through her innocent wisdom, we see that what we have lost sight of as we grow older is still abundant if seen through the eyes of the child.

The prose is poetic: faces in raindrops and heartbeats in mountains, but once again it is the power of the illustrations that lifts the book. Litchfield brings his remarkable talent for different perspectives and clever use of light to insert his own magic on each spread. Whether it’s a parade of people in a sunrise, with the light flooding translucently through the leaves on the page, or the underwater fragmented light shimmer of a layered background as strange and wondrous horse fish swim through the river, there is both a lifting and lightness to the colourful illustrations. Each drawing pulsates with imagination in a kind of modern dreamlike wonderland, the book getting more and more fantastical as it progresses.

This is an enchanting book about humanity – encouraging intergenerational relationships, wonder in the world around us, and also the power of the imagination to soar and grow. A rainbow of images and prose. You can buy it here .

human body
The Human Body: A Pop-up Guide to Anatomy by Richard Walker, illustrated by Rachel Caldwell
Lastly, it would not be right to explore humans and humanity without one in-depth look inside the body.  This comprehensive, somewhat gruesome, guide to the human body invites the reader to venture on a real post-mortem examination, cleverly using paper engineering so that the reader can look beneath body parts – my favourite section definitely the abdomen, in which you can open up the body to see the kidneys and small intestine from different angles.

The illustrations feel old-school, traditional, multi-layered in their detail (each is highly captioned to show which body part is which), and also with instruments pencil-sketched too, so that the scalpel and tweezers lie happily next to the body. The book explains the different systems of the body – circulatory, respiratory etc, with keen observation and elucidation. Sentences are short and sweet, keeping it simple without numerous subclauses interrupting the information, and it feels matter-of-fact and clear.

You can lift the blood spatter to see it under a microscope, or open the heart to see how it works. Each tooth has been extracted so that they can be labelled, and the thorax can be opened in many layers to explore the ribs, lungs and heart. There’s even opportunity to remove the skin from the upper arm and shoulder to see the muscles underneath. This is a thoroughly enjoyable way to be educated on the human body and how it works, and a beautifully stylised well-thought-out book. You can buy it here .