exploration

The Road Less Travelled

migrationMigration by Mike Unwin and Jenni Desmond
This is an spectacularly stylish book telling the story of the incredible journeys of twenty animals. Mike Unwin, UK travel writer of the year, has been superbly paired with Jenni Desmond, winner of The New York Times Best Illustrated Children’s Book, to draw attention to the migration patterns of the monarch butterfly, great white shark, caribou, Arctic tern and many others. Whether it be seasonal changes, a search for food, a place to breed, or an escape from a hostile environment, these are scintillating journeys that can occur annually or once in a lifetime.

Each animal is afforded a double page spread and each of these double pages looks as individual as the animal itself, and startlingly beautiful enough to hang on the wall. The butterflies, for example, in ‘Forests of Flutter’, are shown a-fluttering among the trees, with incredible perspective and perspicacity so that the reader feels as if they are standing amongst them, waiting for one to land on their palm.

The text matches the beauty of the pictures; it is told informatively but also poetically. Monarchs ‘dance’ in the air like ‘confetti’. Sentences are short and specific, and the four to six paragraphs per spread give a comprehensive overview. The reader will gasp often at the huge distances the animals travel – the delicate hummingbird, weighing less than a sugar lump, flies 800 km across the ocean.

The book manages to be a staple non-fiction text as well as depicting the awesome beauty of the world with powerful text and alluring images. The range of animals is well thought out – and well indexed at the back on a migration map of the world, with hints of conservation advice. It’s not often that a reader will find the Christmas Island red crab adjacent to the Globe skimmer dragonfly, the blue wildebeest and whooping crane. Here, they come together to create a thrilling book. Make the journey here.

journeysJourneys by Jonathan Litton, illustrated by Dave Shephard, Chris Chalk, Jon Davis and Leo Hartas
From animals to humans. This book gathers stories of human discovery, amazing endeavours, untrodden paths, and journeys that explorers have made from the earliest times – before they could even document them.

Journeys craftily concentrates on the lesser known explorers, the lesser well-trodden paths, so that although Christopher Columbus gets a mention, it is Nobu Shirase’s race to the South Pole that draws attention, the lawless Mary Bryant, the impressive James Holman, the pony express in the Wild West.

What’s great fun about these snippets is the unpredictability of the journeys – not only the road travelled and hitches along the way, but also the discovery upon arrival. Alexander Gordon Laing may have been murdered on his quest to find Timbuktu, but many others came back to tell and document their extraordinary stories.

The book is ordered physiographically, and also kind of chronologically so that it begins with exploration across the seas by the Polynesians, the history of which has been pieced together by archaeological evidence and knowledge of their culture. Towards the end of the book are journeys by motor car, and finally the exploration of space.

But as well as simply telling the stories of each explorer and each journey in paragraphs, sometimes punctuated by quotes from the explorer, the text seeks to ask questions too – why do humans make journeys with the dangers and risks involved – what are the rewards, and is curiosity itself a justifiable reason?

There are many extraordinary journeys in here, including Auguste Piccard and his balloon flights, Thomas Stevens with his penny farthing, and Nikolay Przewalski and his wild horses. Whether it’s all-encompassing across global cultures is difficult to tell, but it certainly attempts to be diverse and not be wholly ‘western’ focussed. There are bound to be sensitivities when discussing explorers and their treatment of indigenous people, the use of habitats etc, but Litton has tried to be fair.

The accompanying ink drawing illustrations are varied – some full-page pictures, other annotated maps, some vignettes, all with a sense of movement, and they balance the pages well. The character sketches all depict fierce determined travellers with a sense of a faraway look in their eyes, but again, there may be sensitivities to how some peoples are depicted. Explore it here.

mapmakers raceThe Mapmakers’ Race by Eirlys Hunter
I wanted to love this book about four children entering a competition to map a rail route through uncharted mountains. It has all the makings of a great adventure story, and from a writer who brings knowledge of the amazing landscapes of the South Island of New Zealand and Snowdonia in Wales. The premise starts off well enough. The children and their mother are on board the train to take them to the start of the competition, but when the mother fails to get back on after a break, the children are left to their own devices. There’s the inevitable panic and alarm and much humour too, before the children realise too much is at stake and they must enter the competition without parental guidance – a competition against professional adult route-finders.

There’s much debate about finding food (children left alone must deal with such matters), and of course dastardly cheating from some of the other competitors, and really beautiful descriptions of the difficult pathways and encounters with nature.

My caveat to loving this novel is the magical realism evoked when one of the children develops the ability to leave her body and fly up in the air to get a birds’ eye view and map their route. It just didn’t work for me, although other readers may find this the appealing strand of the story.

For those who love journeys though, this is a good read with beautiful illustrations throughout – particularly the maps at the beginning of each chapter. I would heartily recommend Brightstorm by Vashti Hardy and The Explorer by Katherine Rundell as other ‘exploration’ novels. To purchase The Mapmakers’ Race, click here.

 

My Favourite Exploration Story Influences by Vashti Hardy

A big welcome to Vashti Hardy, author of Brightstorm (my current book of the week). Recent tales of explorers that have enthralled me include The Explorer by Katherine Rundell and Shackleton’s Journey by William Grill. Brightstorm too has kept me enthralled, with its adventurous tale of twins, Maudie and Arthur. This new adventure in exploration is sumptuously imagined, gloriously told, and cunningly executed. It is, in fact, as delightful as stumbling upon a new peninsula or archipelago you didn’t know existed. Linked to historical tales of daring and bravery, as well as twinkling with gems from stories past, Brightstorm is a wonderful new middle grade novel. Here, Vashti Hardy explores real-life inspirational adventurers. 

We all know that real-life is often where we find the most phenomenal stories, and the tales of explorers and adventurers are a treasure box full of sparkling story seeds. Here are my favourite explorer/adventurer influences for Brightstorm:

Ernest Shackleton’s Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition (1914–17)

“Better a live donkey than a dead lion.”

Aside from the advert Shackleton placed in a London newspaper being my initial influence for Brightstorm, the tale of the Trans-Antarctic Expedition has always held a particular fascination for me. Although it went about as far from the plan as possible, the resulting story is one of inspirational endurance and survival against the odds. One of the most interesting aspects is how Shackleton’s legendary leadership skills contributed. He had a unique warm style, built genuine friendships with the crew and displayed admiration for each member of his team, which I kept in mind when creating the crew of the Aurora. Although this expedition failed to reach the destination, it achieved many fantastic firsts and feats and I think it’s a great lesson in how much can be learned and achieved even through failure.

brightstormAmelia Earhart – Aviator (1928 First woman to fly across the Atlantic)

“Adventure is worthwhile in itself.”

Earhart’s autonomous driven spirit was an inspiration for sky-ship aviator Harriet Culpepper – you may spot glimpses of Amelia in Harriet’s short, wind-swept hair and I hope in her persistent and intrepid personality! Amelia Earhart accomplished many firsts and record-breaking feats in aviation and inspired a generation of female aviators, but also had a wide reach in inspiring females to achieve whatever they wanted. I wanted to create a host of clever and resourceful females in Brightstorm for young girls and boys to look up to, and Amelia Earhart helped me form them.

Edmund Hillary – Mount Everest expedition 1953

“I think it all comes down to motivation. If you really want to do something, you will work hard for it.”

Something of Edmund Hillary’s modest outlook, coupled with his obvious enjoyment of tackling great feats and dangers, is hugely inspiring. He regarded himself as an ordinary person with ordinary qualities and therefore adventuring was for anyone, just like him. I like to think there is a little of this in Arthur Brightstorm – an ordinary boy from no great lineage of explorer family going out there and giving it his all. Edmund Hillary took pleasure in the intense effort required to achieve extraordinary things, and had a great attitude, valuing comradeship and shared exploits in the company of peers (which is what a great crew is all about!).

Nelly Bly – Around the World in 72 Days (1889-1890)

“Very well,” I said angrily, “Start the man, and I’ll start the same day for some other newspaper and beat him.”

In 1888, journalist Nelly Bly suggested to her editor at the New York World that she take a trip around the world, attempting to turn Phileas Fogg’s fictional journey in Around the World in Eighty Days into fact for the first time. On approaching her editor, he told her that it was impossible for her to do it because she was a woman and would need a protector and she would need to carry so much baggage that it would impede rapid changes. He told her that only a man could do it. Nelly replied with the quote above, and consequently the newspaper went on to commission her trip. She set off with the dress she was wearing, a sturdy overcoat, changes of underwear, a small travel bag with toiletry essentials, and a purse of money around her neck. She broke the preceding record and the fictional one too and made the journey in just 72 days. Nelly Bly’s gutsy attitude makes me smile and I think something of her certainly found its way into Felicity Wiggety!

If you’re writing and stuck for character, try thinking about figures from history who inspire you – what role might they fill in a story?

With huge thanks to Vashti for her guest blog. Vashti Hardy lives near Brighton and was a primary school teacher before moving into digital marketing. She is an alumni member and buddy at the Golden Egg Academy. Brightstorm is her debut novel published by Scholastic. You can buy it here

Brightstorm by Vashti Hardy

brightstormThe great era of exploration is over. Much of our world has been seen and documented, but humans haven’t lost their drive to be the first, to make their mark, and certainly haven’t let go of the idea of heroism. But so often the marks humans make, the braveries people display, are small acts of heroism in a known world. So, we turn to fiction to replicate that experience of exploring the unknown, of seeking out a new world and experiencing new adventure within it.

Brightstorm by Vashti Hardy is doubly exciting, because it is not just the reader who is doing the exploring, but the protagonists too.

Twelve-year-old twins, Maudie and Arthur Brightstorm hear that their explorer father has died in an attempt to reach South Polaris – the very southernmost point in their world. Not only that, but he broke the moral code of explorers, stealing fuel from his competitors on his way. The daring twins are intent upon not only clearing their father’s name, believing he would never do such a thing, but also exploring the region for themselves – after all they are Brightstorms.

What could be a run-of-the-mill adventure story, Hardy turns into a fresh, insightful and clever novel of exploration with her clear-eyed writing, and her host of memorable characters.

Maudie possesses exemplary engineering skills, using her analytical mind to solve problems and provide technical solutions. She may be sited in a fantasy landscape, but she approaches technical tasks with a modern outlook – pragmatic and able – there is no gender discrimination here. She forges a prosthetic iron arm for her brother, but has the foresight to see that when they are lost, with the addition of a pool of water, it could act as a compass.

Indeed, Arthur is almost the only male in this female dominated cast, and it is he who shows his sensitive side – painfully aware of the feelings of others, sensing shifts in body language, danger in the air. But he too is an explorer – brave and intrepid.

Maudie and Arthur join Harriet Culpepper’s expedition to track back to South Polaris, on her ingenious sky-ship that uses water as fuel in a new environmentally friendly development, much to the admiration and envy of her peer explorers. What’s more, her ship has a canny disguise, to avoid saboteurs, and even I was envious of this quirk.

The environment is touched upon further with mentions of whale huntings, and humans’ domination of the landscape, all cleverly woven into the story without being preachy or self-congratulatory.

But as well as being aware of our modern leanings towards gender equality, saving the environment and STEM solutions, Hardy also shows us a mirror of our own world in the inequalities of hers. There are the slums of Lontown, the drudgery and hard work. There is the indignation of those of the Third Continent, who do not like to be called by such a derogatory name. And there is also, of course, a villainous explorer who will stop at nothing to sate her ambition.

But among the cogs and compasses, there is humour too: the cook Felicity and her penchant for endless cups of tea, Harriet and her dashing ways of pushing through the darkest moments.

Small flickers of other inspirational books light the path for readers too – I sensed a glimmer of Pullman in the ‘sapient’ animals of the Brightstorm world, who are less present than the daemons of Northern Lights, but also crucial to the plot, as well as the helpfulness of wolves from Piers Torday’s The Last Wild, and many more besides.

But mainly, Brightstorm feels fresh and modern – because although Hardy has veered into fantasy by creating her own world for the Brightstorm twins, she shows us its beauty through its simplicity. None of the landscapes are hard to envisage, none of the ships’ whirrings hard to grasp. This is a beautifully written children’s novel, matched by exquisite production with foil on the cover and a map on the gatefold.

It is testament to the accessibility of Hardy’s novel that it makes the reader think at the end, in the same way that the talking wolves ask the question to the twins – why is it that humans have the need to explore? When it is not for food or shelter – is it to seek the truth? Or to discover the beauty and complexity of the world? Like fiction, it is both and more. To discover a bit of ourselves, and a taste of the possibilities that are out there. Brightstorm is a triumph – it’s time to take the adventure. You can buy it here.