geography

Explorers and Pioneers

From the history of exploration to the extremes of our planet, from game-changing theories to contemporary outdoor adventures, these four books take the reader on journeys of discovery and endeavour.

darwins voyage of discovery
Darwin’s Voyage of Discovery by Jake Williams
Pure, simple illustrations from upcoming illustrator Jake Williams make this new book about Darwin rather distinctive. Publishing to celebrate 160 years since Darwin’s On the Origin of Species, it follows Darwin’s journey on the The Beagle to Cape Verde, the Galapagos, Australia and more, paying careful attention to the discoveries Darwin made. Split into sections of the journey, with the beginning profiling Darwin’s early life and then the ship and preparations for the voyage, the rest plots the geography with basic maps and then wildlife of the region that Darwin noted.

The book goes into detail on the creatures, noting their features, but also the questions that Darwin asked about them, sparking ideas of evolution and ancestry. As the book highlights these, today’s reader will also begin to think – about exploration and discovery, but also about making connections and learning from nature – how analysis of behaviours and patterns can provoke theory. The space on the pages allows for this freedom of thought. There are no contents, no glossary…this is a book as a voyage – a linear discovery. You can buy it here.

dk explorers
DK Explorers, illustrated by Jessamy Hawke, written by Nellie Huang
This is a beautifully designed primer to exploration, with an introduction from explorer Barbara Hillary. Taking in the breadth of what exploration means – from adventuring to the furthest reaches of geography, whether it be deep sea or outer space – to understanding the commitment, determination and courage that being an explorer means, this book will open up the reader’s eyes to what has been achieved and at what cost.

Divided into sections: sea and ice, land, air and space, the book focuses on personalities – taking a double page for each explorer. There is a marvellous mix of graphics, of course maps, but also photographs of artefacts from American William Clark’s compass,  to photographs of British archaeologist Gertrude Bell on exploration, as well as full page illustrations that bring the scenes to life. There are first person accounts and quotes, as well as third person explanations and captions. Engaging and informative, this is a lovely nonfiction book, with careful nods to inclusivity, and a reflection on the darker side of exploration, all appropriate for the age group (9+yrs). You can buy it here.

adventures on earth
Adventures on Earth by Simon Tyler
This too divides the world into geographical regions, including polar, mountainous, volcanic, oceanic and more, looking at the extremes of our Earth, and noting their features, their wildlife, and the people who have discovered and explored them. With a nod to conservation issues too, this is a compelling looking book, with large shapes and blocks of colour denoting entire regions – deserts in terracotta and brown, caves in deep black, and oceans, in a nice touch, with a deep sunset beyond.

At times, the text is hard to read against its dark background, at other times stark against the polar regions, but always fascinating and packed with information. Maps and a glossary give clear guidance. Tyler’s background as a graphic designer shines through – some features look poster-like in their blockiness, and the design feels bold and sophisticated. Like some of the explorations it features, such as El Capitan and Dos Ojos, this is certainly attention-grabbing. You can buy it here.

wild girl
Wild Girl: How to have Incredible Outdoor Adventures by Helen Skelton, illustrated by Liz Kay
For those inspired by books such as those above, this may be a child’s entry point into their own exploration. Skelton has been and done many things and this book showcases her various explorations, from cycling to the South Pole to kayaking the length of the Amazon. It tracks the adventure, describes the preparation, kit and training, as well as the specific details such as going to the toilet and staying hydrated, as well as highly personal details such as cravings for apples and drying hair. Then each section attempts to give hints as to how a child can have their own adventures and explorations closer to home.

In the ‘sand’ adventure section, it suggests beach running, campfires and even sand boarding. For ‘rivers’, Skelton encourages ghyll scrambling, rafting, kite-surfing and more. These are not adventures for the garden, but certainly high-level activities that require some ‘warnings’, which are in place in the book. I particularly liked the idea of having a wild adventure in a city, making use of seeing things from a different perspective, such as going low, or going high. This is a highly personal recollection of voyages taken, but also an aspirational one for children wanting to be like Helen Skelton. The design is busy, but nicely arranged to read part-diary, part information manual, with plenty of colour, illustrations and photographs to draw the eye. An admirable non-fiction on the realities of modern exploration. You can buy it here.

With thanks to Pavilion, DK, and Walker publishers for the review copies.

Prisoners of Geography: Our World Explained in 12 Simple Maps by Tim Marshall, illustrated by Grace Easton and Jessica Smith

prisoners of geographyThere’s much book reading in my house. But my husband is the one who consumes the most non-fiction: a range of topics from tech, feminism, history, sociology and more. One day a few years ago, he came in from his commute raving about his latest read – an intriguing look at our world called Prisoners of Geography by Tim Marshall. And although the ideas in the book are set out with supreme clarity, it was never going to make it onto my nine year old’s bedside reading pile.

And then, to my huge delight, Simon and Schuster advertised the fact that, with Tim Marshall, they were publishing a children’s version. And it’s now available from all good bookshops.

This book magnificently stretches across the curriculum, pulling together geography and history to explain why countries might act aggressively towards others, where the world’s resources lie, why borders and access to seas are so important, and how our human expansion across the globe has precipitated wars and hostility, peace and collaboration. An introduction and explanation of geopolitics for children.

The maps aren’t to scale but that’s not what they’re for in this book. In fact, some of the ideas of the maps work better when toyed with – one of the most intriguing maps in the book is ‘the true size of Africa,’ in which Marshall, Easton and Smith illustrate the actual size of the continent, cleverly fitting other countries into its space for relativity.

With other maps the idea is to offer a fresh perspective on their use and influence – a range of mountains may look pretty, but it also provides a barrier from one region to another, sometimes useful and sometimes not. Large coastlines may prove useful for trade but difficult for security. Huge resources may grow a country’s wealth, but leave it vulnerable to exploitation.

Marshall writes and explains these issues with lucidity and a greatly assured calmness. The text is accessible and coherent, even when dissecting the thorniest political moves. And in short chunks or paragraphs surrounded by numerous illustrations, so that the brain is kept busy, engaged, and informed.

The book deals with all major areas of the globe region by region, starting with Russia, and moving on through China, USA, Canada, Europe, Africa and beyond, looking at their geology and how this affects politics and economics. There’s a great caveat at the start of the book explaining how this book contains abridged ideas from the adult version and can’t cover everything, and for me, it worked in covering the major geopolitical issues of our time, (even though the paragraph on the reasons for European cohesion may make some Remainers wince in acknowledgement). This is, after all, a point of view rather than an out-and-out fact book.

This Illustrated children’s version adds a simplicity and accessibility to Marshall’s prose explanation. Each map has small graphics depicting major symbols and landmarks, such as The Great Wall of China, the Mojave Desert, the Amazon Rainforest, while the prose and captions explore why these are significant both geographically and politically. Rather marvellously, our understanding of the USA as a global superpower is illustrated by a map of military bases across the world, as well as the geography of its own country. And as well as maps, there are large full page illustrations to highlight key distinctive factors of a region. Africa is beautifully portrayed with a thriving city as an example, as well as a stunning illustration of the Victoria Falls. But there are smaller vignettes too – Europe’s industrial revolution, China’s navy.

Every page holds interest and provokes thought. Of course there are territorial lines, disputed areas, gas pipelines, oil refineries, raging waterfalls that hinder transport, and a dissection of how crucial pathways were opened up – the Panama Canal, the Northwest Passage.

Country names are written across the map in a kind of handwriting scrawl typeface which makes the image feel familiar and personal, and this touch matches the prose, which reads as if it is written by a great storyteller – slotting into that narrative non-fiction genre, which is so popular. The informality of the chosen typeface for place-names also emphasises the somewhat arbitrary nature of the countries – borders and names often imposed by faraway strangers, particularly in the case of Africa and the Middle East.

Marshall highlights the incredible importance of transport, from rivers to access to seas and therefore global trade, as well as land rich in resources and land fertile for farming. These are all things that are and will be affected by climate change, and the impact is there to see – floodplains and regions hit by fires, melting polar ice and more. But also, by pointing to these land attributes, Marshall pinpoints the geographical ties that bind humanity despite any cultural differences. We all need food, shelter, security, community and trade, and that’s why the world we inhabit is both small and large, and such a topic of massive import.

Why is Tibet important? Why is Bangladesh poor? Why is America a superpower?

This is one of the most important children’s books published in the past few years. Buy your curious children a copy, and entreat them to try to understand others. It’s a definitive tome for how we think about the world, and will open up their compassion to people from around the world – why we move where we move, how we use the world’s resources, and an insight into how the world’s geography might change with climate change and how we might have to adapt because of it. Fascinating, educational, vital reading.

With huge thanks to Simon and Schuster for the early review copy. Credit also to adapters Emily Hawkins and Pippa Crane.

Buy your own copy here.

We Are All Greta

Held up by many as a symbol of hope for the future, Greta Thunberg and her #ClimateStrikes have become a familiar occurrence. Children’s publishers have a difficult task – they need to promote worthy causes, and provide a moral standard, and yet also make money – they are businesses after all. To cash in on the Greta phenomenon seems like good business sense, but at the same time, they can inform children about climate change, and show them how to be their own individual force for good.

we are all gretaWe Are All Greta: Be Inspired to Save the World by Valentina Giannella, illustrated by Manuela Marazzi
This book was first published in April in Italy, and quickly sold out of its first print run of 10,000 copies. Now translated into English, We Are All Greta hits the bookshelves here. The book is actually less about Greta herself, and more about the science behind the climate crisis and the impact that the individual can have, once they have the knowledge behind them.

And this knowledge is provided in this wonderfully concise yet informative book, which explains how long the science about climate change has been around (since Fourier discovered that CO2 can warm the atmosphere and the surface of the planet in 1824!), and the important fact that the solutions are there, if only we would put them into effect.

Of course, much collaboration is needed – across countries – but Giannella is also quick to point out how each individual can help. This really is empowerment for youth – with this slim book children will have the facts at their fingertips to convince others of the climate emergency.

The book is divided into neat chapters: sustainable development, drinking water, waste, cities, biodiversity and much more. I was ‘green’ before I read this book, now I’m armed with knowledge and intent.

It also doesn’t provoke anxiety – some have been worried that teaching children about the devastating effects of climate change promotes anxiety in the young. Quite the contrary here – told in distinctly calm prose, it simply lays out the facts and provides insight for how to act. And much of the science and data is absolutely fascinating.

Illustrations appear between chapters – but there are three or four full pages of text to each chapter. For less able readers, I would recommend reading with an adult.

All in all an excellent and massively important resource. Save the world here. For other bloggers providing extracts and giving away copies, see the links below.

gretas story
Greta’s Story: The Schoolgirl who went on strike to Save the Planet by Valentina Camerini, translated by Moreno Giovannoni, illustrations by Veronica ‘Veci’ Carratello

This slim book is much more of a biography of Greta Thunberg. Of course, Greta is still only 16, and so readers might wonder what there is to learn about her so far. In fact, the book spends much time trying to explain how Greta negotiated and persuaded. For any children learning persusasive language as part of their primary school literacy curriculum, this book is quite an eye-opener. From having science and truthful information as evidence, to being able to use your voice in a powerful way and in the right places at the right times, the author talks about what makes Greta so successful in carrying her message. Of course there’s the impact of social media, but more than this the book highlights Greta’s determination, her resilience, and her passion, as well as her supportive family.

At the back, the book lists ways in which the reader can make a difference, and has a glossary of difficult words, but I imagine most readers will be able to learn about the power of an individual, and what that takes, just from reading Greta’s story. Be empowered here.

kids fight plastic
Kids Fight Plastic by Martin Dorey, illustrated by Tim Wesson
Veering away from Greta herself, but keeping very much on message is this lively and colourful little guide to fighting the scourge of plastic pollution. Subtitled, ‘How to be a #2minutesuperhero’, the book is written by the founder of the Global Beach Cleaning Movement, and he wants children everywhere to eschew plastic at home, school, and on days out, choosing alternatives instead. Packed with colour illustrations, and laid out with colourful boxes of text, cartoons, annotations and more, this delves deep into the anti-plastic revolution.

There’s information at the beginning about why plastic is harmful, then a handy and comprehensive guide to the different types of plastic, before some incredibly well thought-out and refreshing ideas on how to combat plastic – not just recycling or reusing a water bottle.

There’s fighting plastic at the park, at theme parks, at the cinema and more, as well as information on what we should really be flushing down the toilet and why, and the impact of washing clothes. There’s even a fight-plastic party. Each ‘mission’ is labelled with how many points children could accrue by achieving these plastic-fighting missions. Fight your superhero battle here.

Habitats, Biomes, Ecosystems

Following on from Earth Day on Monday, and my review of some Oceans books, I wanted to share a few more books that really shine with their content about Planet Earth.

wildernessWilderness: Earth’s Amazing Habitats by Mia Cassany, Marcos Navarro
This oversize book showcases sixteen amazing habitats around the world from the Niokolo-Koba National Park in Senegal to the Qinling Mountains of China and beyond, and yet this is not scientific discovery so much as an impressive display of the effect achieved by digital artistry. Each page is an abundance of colour and pattern, and settles on a particular species native to that habitat. For example, Bengal tigers in Sundarbans National Park, geckos in the tropical rainforests of Madagascar. In this latter case, the illustration shows their intense brown and pink patterned bodies carefully camouflaged against similarly defined leaves – even the shapes fit together. On some spreads the animals are better hidden than others, leading the reader to seek and celebrate the creature within. Very scant text on each page gives a hint of the wildlife within and the beauty of the area. There is an emphasis on conservation and protection of species, and a world map to locate each habitat.

Each page feels more exotic than the last with an intricate web of colour and pattern creating the flora and fauna – the Tehuacan-Cuicatlan Valley is a riot of colour and densely laid pattern so that the cactus plants feel as if they stretch back and back, giving depth and perspective.

At the end of the book is a find out more section – intelligently showing each double page in miniature with the creatures labelled and identified, and showing how many creatures are depicted (you’ll be amazed at how many you missed first time round). There is factual content here too. An absorbing coffee-table-like book that will keep children enthralled and inspired as much by the artwork and design as by the creatures and information within. It’ll have them clamouring to visit far-flung places. You can buy it here.

incredible ecosystemsThe Incredible Ecosystems of Planet Earth by Rachel Ignotofsky
Ignotofsky’s distinctive style is highly recognisable from the very popular Women in Science book, but here she turns her attention to ecosystems. This is indeed an ‘incredible’ book in the level of detail of information provided, but also in the detail of the illustrations, diagrams, and presentation. From the biome map in the beginning, with its bright coloured key and succinct explanation, to the graphic representation of the food web and flow of energy, in every diagram and illustration and every caption there is a wealth of information.

This is comprehensive and yet incredibly readable. Teaching so much – for example, the importance of the edges of the ecosystem, to microscopic ecosystems, a great deal of information is covered in a short space, for the examples I have mentioned so far are just the beginning. The book then branches out into the different areas of the world, pinpointing particular parts such as the ecosystem of the Alps, a redwood forest, the Mojave Desert and much more.

Aquatics are dealt with next, and then plants, carbon cycle (with a super illustration that not only informs but amuses with its distinctive personality), water cycle (check out the smiling clouds), and of course the impact of humans, positive and negative. In fact, this viewpoint informs most of the book – there is a slant in the text to the wonders of the natural world and humans’ responsibility to appreciate, protect and nurture, lending it a child-centric vision rather than purely scientific. The glossary is illustrated too – there isn’t a page that doesn’t amaze, result in further examination, or stimulate curiosity. Quite a feat. You can buy it here.

paper world planet earthPaper World: Planet Earth by Bomboland and Ruth Symons
Not always won over by clever gatefolds or pop-up designs as they can tend to be gimmicky, this book proves that used correctly, paper engineering can inform, inspire and dazzle.

Looking through Earth to see its different layers in lift-up flaps, or feeling the slits and cut outs that show oceanic crusts and oceanic ridges, or pulling up a flap to reveal an underwater volcano, the clever cutting and shaping of the pages gives literal layers of depth and perspective to the biomes the authors wish to showcase.

The newness of the book meant I had to run my hands along the pages to find the flaps, at the same time giving me a physical awareness of the lines of the book – cut out lines in the illustration that highlight the currents in the sea, the canyons in the mountains, the build up of cloud in a tornado.

This is a shrewd design, teaching geography in a physical and tactile way. The text is clear and precise too. Short sharp sentences explaining layers and processes with ease. Detailing tectonic plates, glaciers, caves, deserts, weather and more. You can buy it here.

the nature girlsThe Nature Girls by Aki
This phenomenally feminist and ultra modern exciting book portrays a group of girls exploring the world’s habitats, all in rhyming verse.

Although a collective group in their yellow outfits and hats, each is different in the colour of their hair, skin, arrangement of body language or expression on their faces.

They swim with dolphins, trek the land, ride camels across sand, explore woodland and traverse snowy tundra. The illustrations are unique and surprising, from the patterned mountains of ice to the exotic jungle and the colourful sea.

For young readers who want to start learning about habitats, this is a bright beautiful picture book, with facts about the different biomes at the back. Perfect early learning.

You can buy it here.

plastic planetPlastic Panic! By Robin Twiddy
Of course to keep our planet as wonderful as the books above describe, we need to work a little harder at looking after it.

This up-to-date non-fiction book attempts to explain the explosion of plastic usage and why it’s dangerous to our planet. Each colourful spread uses a mixture of photos and diagrams to explore why the human race started using so much plastic, and when they realised it was a problem, before ultimately explaining what the reader can do about it.

Starting with a message from the future, it carefully details the history of plastic – how great it seemed to start with – and then explains the level of toxins within plastic and its longevity. There are facts and figures – up to 2018, and a glossary at the back. Three informative double pages at the end talk through recycling, reusing and reducing, with community ideas and scientific solutions. An excellent tool for educating and responding. You can buy it here.

Oceans

ocean secrets of the deepToday is Earth Day. When we look at the Earth from space, it’s mainly blue. The oceans cover more than 70 per cent of our planet. Three sensational books take the reader up close and down into the depths of our fabulous oceans. Firstly, Oceans: Secrets of the Deep by Sabrina Weiss and Giulia De Amicis takes a comprehensive look at this largest habitat on Earth, from amazing creatures to the different zones in the sea: Twilight, Midnight, Hadal, the Abyss! And then it explores different ecosystems within, from kelp forests to coral reefs, before delving into surprising facts and creature information – the sounds of the ocean, journeys and migration, and lastly of course, how we can protect this marvellous environment.

Filled with colourful, stark illustrations and infographics, printed on high-quality paper, the book exudes a sheen.

Author Sabrina Weiss works for the British Ecological Society and the Marine Megafauna Foundation, and below she talks about her work protecting endangered ocean giants such as whale sharks and manta rays.

How much do we really know about the ocean?

By Sabrina Weiss

Mornings in Praia do Tofo usually started with a cup of coffee on our veranda watching the waves lap on the shore. Hoping to escape the hectic city life for a while and donate our professional expertise to a good cause, Giulia De Amicis and I had found ourselves sharing a thatched house in this remote fishing village in southern Mozambique while volunteering for a charity that aims to study and protect threatened sharks and rays.

View from the Marine Megafauna Foundation office, the charity Sabrina and Giulia worked for in Tofo © Sabrina Weiss

We have long been lovers of the ocean and avid scuba divers, and so here we were, sipping our freshly-brewed coffees and recounting our incredible encounters from the day before. As we were hovering midwater during our final dive, I had pointed to three manta rays which were slowly approaching the reef below us. Mantas are often observed around the ‘cleaning stations’ on these bustling coral reefs, where they have their wounds tended by small fish. By doing this the mantas stay clean and healthy and the cleaners get a free meal.

We couldn’t believe our luck. We had been reading and hearing lots about these elusive animals and had worked together on infographics and posters to share our love and fascination with the rest of the world and, yet, only now did we get to see them with our own eyes. These gentle giants, which can reach a ‘finspan’ of seven metres, are very curious and may even swim towards divers to inspect them before vanishing into the big blue.

Giant manta ray feeding near the surface, Tofo © Sabrina Weiss

Even more astonishing is that no one has seen a manta ray give birth in the wild. Ever. It is thought that pregnant females may be seeking out pupping grounds along this beautiful coastline, possibly not far from Tofo. They may be giving birth right under our noses. There is still so much to learn about the secret lives of mantas.

Giulia returned to Milan the following day, but it wasn’t a final goodbye; it was the beginning of a new friendship and an exciting book project that allowed us to tell the fascinating stories of our beautiful and mysterious ocean-dwelling friends.  

With thanks to Sabrina Weiss. Ocean: Secrets of the Deep by Sabrina Weiss, illustrated by Giulia De Amicis is available now at £14.99, published by What on Earth Books, and you can buy it here

beneath the wavesOther budding ocean enthusiasts and environmentalists will be keen to explore Helen Ahpornsiri’s Beneath the Waves: A Journey Through the World’s Oceans, text by Lily Murray. This book is something quite special – each of Ahpornsiri’s illustrations are made using real flora and foliage, which has been preserved using traditional flower pressing methods before she combines the individual pieces into a collage.

The plants are organised by species or colour before being cut out and arranged to form the patterns and colours of plant life and the animals that dwell within. Much use is made of seaweed – fronds of purple laver creating the image of a whale shark, for example.

The book is arranged into four distinct parts: coast, open ocean, tropics and polar waters, and each section explores the flora and fauna within, giving concise information. The illustrations are really quite extraordinary – the seahorse is rendered with a combination of tiny green flowers, light pink ferny leaves, and some darker pinkish brown flora to create an animated, almost fiery, expressive animal.

A simple glossary at the back gives further information. This is a stunning book that holds a gentleness and will provoke a tender wonder at the natural world.

Look closely here.

ocean helene druvertOcean by Helene Druvert, text by Emmanuelle Grundmann also plays with the reader’s expectations, this time with paper-cuts. Using laser cuts and paper folding, the book has fun conveying information in a smart way with careful paper engineering.

The depths of the oceans are shown using wavy paper cutting, the tide spread uses a large side flap to represent the tide coming in or out, the pebbles are flaps uncovering information on the sea floor, information about waves is given using a wave laser cut to look reminiscent of the famous illustration by Hokusai, the coral reef is stunningly colourful, and the food chain hidden beneath a super predator.

This is a really tactile large-format reference book, with good basic information from the water cycle to the polar regions. Explore the depths here

Look out later this week for my Earth Day Earth books!

 

 

April Showers

home in the rainHome in the Rain by Bob Graham
Turning the everyday into something extraordinary, Graham is the master of embracing a child’s view of the world. This wonderful little tale follows Francie and her mum as they drive home in torrential rain from Grandma’s house. The illustrations loop in and out of the car, as the reader sees the small red car jammed between lorries and oil-tankers on the highway, before zooming into the backseat with Francie, and then out into the countryside tucked away beyond the road, with the wildlife sheltering from the wet, and up into the air as a kestrel dives.

Graham explores the sights, sounds and smells of the everyday – from an argument at an interchange, to the smell of farmyards, the squeaky sound as Francie writes on the steamed up car window, rainbow oil puddles, the noise of the radio, and finally into Francie’s imagination as she wonders what her new baby sister will be named when she’s born.

The observational perspectives of the book pick out what’s familiar and what’s new, just like the coming of a new baby. It’s an atmospheric book, empathetic, and both words and pictures express a softness that feels soothing – an ‘everything’s going to be alright’ tone. You can buy it here. 

rhythm of the rainThe Rhythm of the Rain by Grahame Baker-Smith
A book that takes an image of a small boy playing in his favourite pool on the mountainside, opens up to huge scope as it portrays Earth’s water cycle.

Isaac sees clouds dark above him, the rain pours down into the pool creating streams that flow into the river near his house (beautifully cast on stilts). The book then follows the river into the sea.

It is the ambition of the book that is so impressive. Baker-Smith conveys the cycle of water of course, explaining the ocean steaming into mist, but the magic lies within the water’s journey. He conveys how water adds to the environment, how humans, animals and vegetation interact with it across the globe and throughout time. Water is important and transient, both gentle and powerful. He shows the different ways in which water presents – its stillness in a jar of water, plunging waterfalls, laughing streams, meandering rivers, churning waves. Water is commodity, yet nature, utilitarian resource, yet something to be protected. Pure and simple in its magnitude.

And all the while referring back to Isaac. Each page is an illustrative work of art, and the words ebb and flow like poetry. The use of light in the artworks is extraordinary – Isaac’s reflection in the water as he stands in the natural pool is haunting and wondrous. Not to be missed. Buy your copy here. 

once upon a raindropOnce Upon a Raindrop by James Carter, illustrated by Nomoco
This too is the story of water, but so utterly different in style. Nomoco’s abstract watercolour feels almost like the different types of water itself – sometimes looping down the pages in the form of water-carrying pipes, at others winding its way across the page like a river. There are droplets too – inkstains in circles across a page – and always accompanied by Carter’s poetry as he explores the facts of the matter in lyrics.

Starting with the beginning of time, Carter tracks water on meteors that carry ice, all the way through to water’s uses today – keeping humans clean and healthy – as well as life’s overwhelming necessity for water.

Because each page is so different from the next, both in form of poem and execution of illustration, it allows the reader to dissect the different formations of water and the different elements to it. Modern, fresh and impactful, this makes for a refreshing imbibing of information. Get wet here.

When the Stars Come out by Nicola Edwards, illustrated by Lucy Cartwright

when the stars come outWhenever there’s a new topic at school, there’s a scramble from teachers and some pupils to find the library books that fit, the book that’s pitched correctly for the age group and touches on all the themes that the teacher wants to explore during that term. And rarely does a book match exactly. Probably because then it would be a textbook, rather than a book for exploring, a book for further stimulus and enquiry. When the Stars Come Out by Nicola Edwards, illustrated by Lucy Cartwright, is a refreshing piece of nonfiction that not only ticks the boxes when exploring ‘Time and Place, Earth and Space’ for example, but it also neatly stretches the mind, and causes pause for thought, and elicits pleasure at the same time.

Not just a space book, as the title might imply, When the Stars Come Out intends to explore our whole universe at night-time from the sciencey bits, such as why night occurs and the different constellations in the sky, but also the geographical element – both physical and human – and it also reaches right from the outer echelons of the universe into our very heads; what happens when we sleep?

Diagrams and illustrations begin the story of how the night works, showing the rotation of the Earth in relation to the sun. Then, before the constellations are explored, there’s some history on stargazing, and some recognition of why some people are scared of the dark. The moon and stars are investigated, and then tangents of this, including auroras, moonbows and shooting stars.

Coming down to earth, Edwards explores different landscapes at night, from the city to the desert, rainforests, mountains and many more including the sea, extrapolating which changes happen at night in the darkness. Animals are looked at in more detail in the next chapter, looking at sleep, dreams, nocturnal animals, and of course, humans. This chapter is particularly interesting as it’s rarely dealt with in children’s non-fiction. I liked the pie chart of sleep cycles, our natural rhythms, and then a look at super sleepers and world records, including the man who stayed awake for 11 days. It’s dangerous of course, as explained in the text, but fascinating information.

Lastly, the book investigates extreme days and nights – near the Arctic and Antarctic Circles, as well as clever inventions such as glow in the dark cement and what scientists are working on in terms of night-time and day-time differences in plant growth, for example. The book ends with a glorious celebration of the night – from Diwali to Walpurgisnacht.

This is a joyous and fascinating book. The illustrations are detailed and immersive – both conveying the science in the lunar cycle, but also a sense of wonder and mystery in dreams and night visitors. My only caveat is the size of the text against darkish backgrounds – not good for sleepy eyes – but perhaps the text’s smallness will keep the mind focussed and prevent daydreaming!

The book is large in size but well designed to reflect the information inside. The mountains spread reads as portrait rather than landscape – mirroring mountains of course, but also giving the different levels of mountainous terrain – the birds, the climbers, the foothills. Other pages look like landscapes – the savannah for example, with its panel of night sky at the top, but then it’s land mass stretching towards the reader. The animals are illustrated in action – grazing or in motion, but the text is chunked nicely into individual paragraphs, many in their own colourful panels. The book is extremely visual – the colours subtle rather than garish, reflecting the muted light of night times.

An exciting non-fiction title that illuminates the mysteries of our night-time and stimulates curious minds across a broad spectrum of inter-linking subjects. You can buy it here.

The Cosmic Atlas of Alfie Fleet: A guest post from Martin Howard

cosmic atlas of alfie fleetCharlie Bucket (Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl) was the first name that sprang to mind when I started reading this chucklesome new book from Martin Howard about an impoverished boy who follows up a newspaper advert to earn some quick cash doing odd jobs for an unbelievably eccentric man. But then The Cosmic Atlas of Alfie Fleet deviates from the world of Charlie Bucket into a world (or worlds) of its own, and I was both intrigued and highly amused by the comic writing, the inventive imagining, and the high adventures and cunning of its protagonist, Alfie.

The eccentric man I mentioned is Professor Bowell-Mouvemont, the president of the Unusual Cartography Club, who shows Alfie a series of worlds unknown to the majority of humans on Earth (too preoccupied with their ordinary lives to care). These worlds range from Brains-in-Jars world to planet Maureen and Outlandish. Together, the Professor and Alfie travel through these worlds as explorers. Quick to spot an opportunity, Alfie takes it upon himself to fend off danger by showing the inhabitants of these strange lands some of our own traditions, and marketing them as a way of progressing on his journey. He explains and sells advertising space in his travel guide, gives favourable reviews to inns and pubs, makes a mark on the map of the atlas he’s drawing to indicate good shops, hospitable peoples, and so on.

For the young reader, this is both highly amusing and yet also cunning – giving a serious nod to travel guides and atlases, as Wimpy Kid does for diaries. Illustrated by the award-winning Chris Mould, this is a great new series from an author with a clearly somewhat strange mind. So I asked him for his inspirations…

martin howardI first had the idea to write a travel guide to fantastical lands about fifteen years ago. I’m a huge, geeky fan of fantasy books and (like Alfie) I’ve always loved exploring the maps you find in them. A travel guide seemed like the obvious next step.

It bubbled away in the back of my mind for years before I came back to it. Stone circles, like Stonehenge, have always fascinated me. You find them in many places around the world – from Australia to Europe – and no one knows for sure why. I decided they were intergalactic portals first used by space tourists and, later, by a secret map-making society called the Unusual Cartography Club, which had a mission to explore other worlds. Having Alfie – the book’s protagonist – write a travel guide along his journey seemed perfect.

And that’s how The Cosmic Atlas of Alfie Fleet came about.

When I was young I was bullied all through my school years. In those days no one took bullying very seriously and one or two teachers even joined in. It was difficult to deal with and I found an escape from some pretty horrific verbal (and sometimes physical) abuse in books and comedy. I was lucky to be growing up at a time when some great comedians were making hilarious TV shows and on Thursday nights my parents would let me and my sister stay up late to watch Monty Python’s Flying Circus. Sketches like the Ministry of Silly Walks and Dead Parrot changed my life. If I was having a rough time at school all I had to do was say “no one expects the Spanish Inquisition” to myself in a silly voice and I’d be smiling. I can still quote many Python sketches word for word.

As I got older – I found other shows I loved: The Young Ones, Blackadder, French and Saunders, as well as older comedy movies such as The Hound of the Baskervilles with Peter Cook and Dudley Moore. I saw lots of brilliant comedians perform stand-up, too. Bill Bailey, Jo Brand, Omid Djalili and lots of others. All of those shows, movies and comedians helped shape my own sense of humour.

Comedy is really important to me. It gave me optimism during traumatic times and I don’t understand why some people think funny books aren’t important. Laughter is as much a part of being human as music or love, and just as essential to our happiness. With humour we can laugh at life’s problems; without it the world would be a pretty grim place.

I also grew up during a time when Terry Pratchett was writing. I loved any fantasy books, but because I was so into comedy his had an especially big impact on me. In fact, I went to both the same schools as Pratchett, though he was there years before me. I also shopped regularly in the second-hand bookshop in Penn, Buckinghamshire, on which he based the magical library of the Unseen University. I was lucky enough to meet him once, when he was doing a talk at the local library after his second Discworld book came out, and it’s easy to see in my own writing that he has been a major influence. He introduced humour into fantasy.

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy casts a long shadow, too. Like Terry Pratchett, Douglas Adams made sci-fi funny. Eagle-eyed readers of The Cosmic Atlas of Alfie Fleet might spot I’ve paid a tiny tribute to The Hitchhiker’s Guide! Any book that contains space themes and humour is always going to be compared to The Hitchhiker’s Guide nowadays, and I’ve got the travel guide theme running through mine, too, so I was very aware that I was using a couple of the same ingredients as Douglas Adams. I hope I’ve used them to create a dish that has a very different flavour.

PG Wodehouse had a massive impact. I discovered the Jeeves and Wooster books when I was about twelve and his characters and his use of language to create humour are beyond incredible. In sci-fi and fantasy, I owe inspiration to Neil Gaiman, Tolkien, Ursula K. le Guin, Susan Cooper, as well as Joss Wheedon – I usually watch all seven seasons of Buffy the Vampire Slayer at least once a year! There are lesser well-known writers who have influenced me as well, like Jim Butcher whose pulp-fiction Dresden Files books about a detective wizard in Chicago are fantastic.

It’s impossible to write in isolation: all genres are built over time by writers who have made great contributions, and every writer will have favourites who have shaped the way they write, whether it’s Enid Blyton or Jane Austen. But it’s important that writers find their own voice and – I hope – in The Cosmic Atlas of Alfie Fleet I’ve written a book that recognises where it came from, but which is packed with fresh ideas and which could only have been written by me.

With thanks to Martin Howard. You can buy The Cosmic Atlas of Alfie Fleet written by Martin Howard, illustrated by Chris Mould here

Humans

January seems like a good time to address the different things that make us human, and to show the differences between us.

humans
Humans: The Wide World Awaits by Susan Martineau, illustrated by Vicky Barker
The award-winning team behind Real-life Mysteries have produced a new series called Geographics, which aims to show intriguing geographical facts with dynamic infographics design.

Geographics: Humans certainly is appealing. A thin book with a sturdy paperback cover, the book is bright and colourful throughout. It is quirky too, in that this isn’t just a fact book of information, but aims to provide guidance too.

There is typical geography information, such as on the page entitled ‘Where We Live’, and this shows the world at night with the lights indicating population, and shows the most populated cities, and the least, and the spread of humans around coastlines and in the Northern hemisphere. Following pages have information on water, resources, transportation, power and inventions, but there is also guidance on recycling and communication.

This is a wonderful first approach to human geography, which despite its small size, reaches further than most – using its vibrancy to illuminate facts and the author’s emotional intelligence to promote the idea of being a global citizen, understanding and caring for the planet on which we live. I’m proud to have absorbed the information within easily, and have learnt facts including: more people have a mobile phone than a toilet, and Papua New Guinea has 841 living languages. You can buy it here.

i am human
It’s not just our impact on the Earth but our impact on each other. I am Human: A Book of Empathy by Susan Verde, art by Peter H Reynolds aims to explore, through simple illustrations and text, the idea of who we are inside ourselves – a person who is always learning, with dreams and hopes, but also one who makes mistakes and feels pain and fear and sadness. The third part of the book aims to show the choices available – to be kind and fair, to forgive and move forward – in essence to show empathy. The book is about being the best human you can be, reminding children that they are unique at the same time as belonging to the human race, in which there is familiarity.

Reynolds’ line drawings bring to life this manual for living. The people are diverse and different, yet similar in their thin legs and neat noses. They feel vivacious and active, even when they are blue in both feeling and colour:  fear is represented as a huge ladder stretching to the unknown, sadness is a boy sitting on a ledge – followed swiftly by him standing, arms outstretched, hope on his face as he makes a new choice. There is a wonderful empathy that Reynolds delineates in his expression.

In it’s ability to showcase both self-worth and caring for others, this serves as a good guide in both home and school, for children and adults. You can buy it here.

when I was a child
When I was a Child by Andy Stanton and David Litchfield
is a picturebook that also uses colour wisely, bursting with a zest for nature and life, as it aims to show how humans can embrace the world around them. Ostensibly a book about a child aiming to show her grandmother that the world is still magical, and that wonder still exists, this is also an exploration of imagination and curiosity bearing a subtle environmental message. The grandmother believes that her world is now grey, but through the child’s eyes, through her innocent wisdom, we see that what we have lost sight of as we grow older is still abundant if seen through the eyes of the child.

The prose is poetic: faces in raindrops and heartbeats in mountains, but once again it is the power of the illustrations that lifts the book. Litchfield brings his remarkable talent for different perspectives and clever use of light to insert his own magic on each spread. Whether it’s a parade of people in a sunrise, with the light flooding translucently through the leaves on the page, or the underwater fragmented light shimmer of a layered background as strange and wondrous horse fish swim through the river, there is both a lifting and lightness to the colourful illustrations. Each drawing pulsates with imagination in a kind of modern dreamlike wonderland, the book getting more and more fantastical as it progresses.

This is an enchanting book about humanity – encouraging intergenerational relationships, wonder in the world around us, and also the power of the imagination to soar and grow. A rainbow of images and prose. You can buy it here .

human body
The Human Body: A Pop-up Guide to Anatomy by Richard Walker, illustrated by Rachel Caldwell
Lastly, it would not be right to explore humans and humanity without one in-depth look inside the body.  This comprehensive, somewhat gruesome, guide to the human body invites the reader to venture on a real post-mortem examination, cleverly using paper engineering so that the reader can look beneath body parts – my favourite section definitely the abdomen, in which you can open up the body to see the kidneys and small intestine from different angles.

The illustrations feel old-school, traditional, multi-layered in their detail (each is highly captioned to show which body part is which), and also with instruments pencil-sketched too, so that the scalpel and tweezers lie happily next to the body. The book explains the different systems of the body – circulatory, respiratory etc, with keen observation and elucidation. Sentences are short and sweet, keeping it simple without numerous subclauses interrupting the information, and it feels matter-of-fact and clear.

You can lift the blood spatter to see it under a microscope, or open the heart to see how it works. Each tooth has been extracted so that they can be labelled, and the thorax can be opened in many layers to explore the ribs, lungs and heart. There’s even opportunity to remove the skin from the upper arm and shoulder to see the muscles underneath. This is a thoroughly enjoyable way to be educated on the human body and how it works, and a beautifully stylised well-thought-out book. You can buy it here .

Maps of the United Kingdom by Rachel Dixon, illustrated by Livi Gosling

maps of the united kingdomWhen I was in primary school we had to memorise the countries and capital cities of South America. For a long time many of these were retained in my memory, and even now I’m better at that continent’s geography than Europe. What’s even worse, to my shame, is my lack of knowledge about the geography of my own country, the United Kingdom. And as I watch my children go through school, I realise that it’s something that just isn’t taught. Thankfully, one of them can pinpoint where cities are situated (this is because he knows them from their football clubs), but we are all clueless about counties.

All that’s about to change. Maps of the United Kingdom does exactly what it says on the cover, and although the illustrations seem at first glance to be fairly random – a red post box planted between Devon and Somerset, a hedgehog somewhere between Perth and Kinross and the Highlands – there is both enthusiasm and geographical symbolism behind the illustrations, and the drawings are actually an excellent visual guide to help readers learn and memorise the counties and cities of the United Kingdom.

Divided, as to be expected, between England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales, and then further delineated by county lines – either featuring one large county or several smaller ones – the full page spreads show the geographical placement of the area, and then proceeds to illustrate history, nature, people and scientific breakthroughs originating in the region. The information chosen is specific and well-written, but in such a way that it shouldn’t date. This is both clever and interesting.

Lancashire focusses firstly on Blackpool, illustrated by its tower, but then pulls away to showcase the mill towns and the countryside. Local food plays its part, as does sport, highlighting Lancashire County Cricket Club on the map, but then also drawing a portrait of Andrew Flintoff as one of the regional biographies. Other Lancashire biographies include current personalities such as Brian Cox, but also historical activists such as Edith Rigby. There is information about wildlife and history and suggestions of places to visit to learn more, (the Pendle Witch trials at the Pendle Heritage Centre). For ease of use, each page has the entire map of the UK in one corner with the focus place shown by its county border.

All this means that as well as learning the geography, there is an abundance of trivia to absorb, and seven biographies on each page. Each map is colourful too – a different colour for each county as a background and full colour illustrations laid over the top. The small illustrations are intricate and distinctive, so that the reader can smile at the hands raised by the children on the theme park rollercoaster in Derbyshire, but also see the details in the clothing worn by Elizabeth Gaskell. The buildings too are distinctive – the Pierhead Building in Cardiff with its clock tower to the romantic ruins of Tintern Abbey in The Valleys.

As we divorce from Europe, now might be a particularly good time to become schooled in our local heritage and traditions, and celebrate the people who’ve made Great Britain great. If all this sounds a bit Trumpish and isolationist, it is perhaps only through knowing ourselves that we can seek to understand others. Once you’ve mastered the lay of the land in this book, you’ll be keen to explore Europe and beyond. I know I am. (The maps in the book aren’t to scale, so it’d be wise to consult a proper atlas before leaping from London to Lincoln.)

Written by a travel writer, this is an excellent classroom and home resource, a smashing Christmas present, and suitable for all from about 6 years. You can buy it here.