human body

Humanatomy by Nicola Edwards, illustrated by George Ermos and Jem Maybank

humanatomyAs a mother and primary school librarian, I’m always on the lookout for new non-fiction that complements the curriculum, providing help with homework or imbuing further understanding in a topic, or even stimulating further curiosity and wonder. I love to be able to say, “Go look in this book for the answer,” rather than following a web link that so often disappoints.

This brilliantly high quality book, Humanatomy How the Body Works, is a well-organised and thoughtful guide to the major organ systems in the human body. Perfectly written to assist and stimulate children in Key Stage Two and above, adults will also be sure to find something they didn’t know.

The book begins with an open-out flip section illustration of each of the body’s major organ systems – including of course the nervous system, circulatory system etc. It’s body-shaped, and manages to show both male and female, two different skin tones, as well as front and back of the body where necessary to show differences in that particular circulatory system.

The main part of the book follows suit by dividing into chapters for each organ system, with an introduction explaining how the different systems work together. Each system chapter links back to the flip out illustration, but also contains its own hugely-detailed and annotated diagrams. There is a skin diagram in the integumentary system, which reminds me of one I had to annotate for my GCSE (many moons ago). However, this doesn’t read like a school text book. Instead, facts are presented as answers to interesting questions that children might ask. For example, why do we itch and scratch, why do bruises change colour, why do our hands go wrinkly in the bath, why do we burp? etc.

There are also bitesize sentence facts in small round circles throughout – highlighted ‘Did you know?’. And quite often, I didn’t!

The pages are well designed – a good use of colour, and large illustrations of children tasting, sneezing, shivering for example, which keeps the eye moving across the page. There are numerous diagrams, all labelled to prove the point the text is trying to make.

The circulatory system is dealt with particularly well – using the classic red and blue to show the difference between oxygenated and deoxygenated blood, but in a clever diagram complete with arrows, and separating out the heart and the lungs on the page so that the way the blood flows can be seen clearly. Having just watched a child learn this at school, I know this bit of the book would have been an invaluable learning addition.

The book does cover the reproductive system, without going into exactly how sex works, but deals more with DNA and how each person is individualised. Add to that a detailed, comprehensive and accessible glossary, and thick good quality paper, and this is a nonfiction book produced to the highest order. Well executed, well designed and thoroughly informative. A joy to read and a pleasure to stock at home and in the school library. I’ll need two copies! You can buy one here.

illumanatomy by Kate Davies and Carnovsky

Another advanced, refreshing, well-conceived piece of non-fiction, this time from Wide Eyed Publishers. The book aims to teach about the human body, but does so in a startlingly beautiful visual way. Illumanatomy contains spreads of psychedelic artworks showing a kaleidoscope of colour against a white background, interspersed with other pages that display informative black and white illustrations and accompanying text.

The reason for the full-page psychedelics is because the book comes with a three-coloured lens viewer tucked into a pocket on the inner front cover. By looking through the different coloured lenses at the picture, (as a kind of eye-viewer), the lens enables the reader to effectively x-ray the image on the page, showing organs with the blue lens, muscles with the green, and bones with the red. This interactive idea works really well; the premise follows through. The blue lens is the least effective, only in that it is a bit dark, but the muscles and skeleton show up perfectly. As the reader learns more about each body part, the image they are seeing through the acetate lens becomes clearer.

Each part of the body (and the book divides these into 10, such as the head, the heart, the abdomen, as well as how a baby grows) is shown first in a full page artwork so that the reader can use their viewer, and then dissected again in the ‘anatomy’ room, which gives a black and white illustration, fully annotated with the names of parts, and also explanation. For example, the brain page illuminates the lobe and cortexes and explains which is which and what they do.

A particular pull for me in information books is the ability of the author to convey complex information in a simple way. Anatomy has never been a strong point personally, but the text here is concise and clear. The description of the heart conveys its mechanisms and divisions well, and comes neatly after the circulatory system, so that the individual parts of the whole begin to make sense.

The reproduction chapter is also precise and matter-of-fact, and suits the age group well, placing reproduction within the anatomical sphere. And the muscles and tendons in the leg section are also stripped to their fundamentals, giving a child a first basic understanding of how it works. The author encourages the reader to touch their own leg, feeling for the muscles and tendons being described.

This is the second in this series illustrated by Carnovsky (the nom de plume of Italian illustrators Silvia Quintanilla and Francesco Rugi), the first being Illuminature by Rachel Williams, and whereas usually these interactive lens things feel gimmicky, this is not the case here. The book is well executed, hugely informative, and startlingly attractive. Much to absorb and learn. You can buy a copy here.

The Awesome Body Book by Adam Frost

I’m sure I would have qualified to be a doctor, or at least enjoyed biology more, if this book had been around when I was a youngster. This is a non-fiction chapter book, set out in full colour, and packed with the most incredible facts that will enable the reader to answer quiz questions, startle their teachers and amaze their parents, as well as share delectable, laughable quirks with their friends.

There’s no index or contents, for a very good reason – this is a book of randomly assembled facts to dip into, laid out in colourful infographics and cartoon illustrations.

So the reader can find out what’s edible in their back garden, to which is the biggest/smallest/strangest/longest muscle in the human body, to bacteria, worms, hair, noise, crying, the heart, brainpower and on and on. And each section contains small enjoyable sentences of information.

Amazing the facts might be, but there’s no alternative truth here. The full source and reference list is even listed at the end of the book so that the reader can double check any truths of which they’re unsure.

The diagrams are hilarious – showing how long the human tongue would be if it was proportionally as long as an African hawkmoth’s, there’s a diagram showing different facial hair, and some of the graphics are just plain fascinating – the infographic showing different noises in decibels.

But mainly this book works because as well as being interesting, it’s so accessible. It’s easy to read, and the reader will learn without realising they are absorbing facts, and ‘read’ without realising they are ‘reading’ a book because the facts are in such small morsels.

It answers things that don’t actually come up in biology lessons, and goes beyond farts and worms, (although it does cover these in detail) and delves into the psychology of dreams, colours in different cultures, and behaviour comparisons between humans and animals.

Adam Frost has won the Blue Peter Book Award for a previous title in the series, but this is the first themed title. And it made me use my orbicularis oculi (pars lateralis). See if it makes you use yours! Buy it here.