main

Summer 2019 Reading Recommendations

I always like to leave a list of great new children’s books on my main page at the end of July, because MinervaReads doesn’t blog in August. And, usually you’d find a small selection of picture books, nonfiction, novels etc. This year THERE ARE TOO MANY BOOKS. Narrowing down my summer reads for you has become increasingly difficult. So without further ado, I’ve tried to sum up each book in a concise way in order to feature as many as possible. Flick to the heading for the correct age group.

picture books

Picture books

Falling below the threshold of the age group for whom I normally review, but too adorable to ignore, is a new series of lift-the-flap board books called Treacle Street by Kate Hindley. From following Marcel Trunkmore delivering parcels in Marcel’s Parcels, to the star ballerina bunnies in Prima’s Missing Bunnies, the books are tightly plotted with intricately detailed illustrations for curious minds.

Stylistically arresting, Grandma Z by Daniel Gray-Barnett is a curiosity in itself. Coloured orange and blue, it not only explores the dynamism of a grandparent/grandchild relationship and the power of imagination, but adds retro dimensions and quirky elements to stand out from the crowd. Wild, exuberant, full of energy.

In the holiday spirit, Clem and Crab by Fiona Lumbers is cognitively dissonant as it feels both traditional and completely fresh. Clem explores the beach, and rescues a crab stuck in plastic. If ever a book made you wish you were at the seaside, this is it. And with an environmental message. Illustrations are expressive and wholesome – a whole story encapsulated in each vignette.

Also by the beach is The Tide by Clare Helen Welsh and Ashling Lindsay. Slightly more linear illustrations with harder colouring, this also captures the sensual nature of the seaside, but deals with dementia too. A heartwarming grandfather/grandchild relationship with clever analysis of memories and making memories.

For fun, The Big Stink by Lucy Freegard will capture hearts from the cover, just as mouse is captured by cat in this heist adventure. Nods to Mission Impossible, among other references, this mouse-led caper will have adults chuckling along with captivated children. Who could escape arrest with ears like that?

young fiction

Young Fiction (ages 7-9 years)

Newly independent readers are well served nowadays. Ariki and the Island of Wonders by Nicola Davies and Nicola Kinnear is pure summer adventure. Shipwrecked to a paradise island, Ariki and Ipo are initially struck by the wonder of nature they encounter, but then realise there is a darkness to paradise. With conservation overtones, and textured black and white illustrations, this is an immersive text that sparks a real sense of purpose and love for nature.

It’s not a new premise, but My Babysitter is a Robot by Dave Cousins, illustrated by Catalina Echeverri is neatly executed. A grandma inventor, twins, swimming pools, football and more, this is a fun and funny new series.

Fairy tales remain high on the list of starting points for stories, and Cinders and Sparks by Lindsey Kelk, illustrated by Pippa Curnick is another twist on the Cinderella story. A talking dog, an unreliable fairy godmother, and neighbours called Jack and Jill combine in a modern deviation and continuation of the traditional fairy tale. Fun, neat and magical.

middle grade

Middle Grade (Novels for 9+ years)

Abi Elphinstone’s new novel Rumblestar is possibly her best yet, and that’s saying something. She writes with a keen intelligence, a fiery spark, and a wisdom that infects the fantasy she writes, so that the reader feels there is an importance to the story being told. And she sweeps the reader away with engrossing, action-filled storytelling. In this first of the Unmapped Chronicles series, Casper accidentally stumbles into an unmapped kingdom in danger, and finds out that the peril is tied to his own world.

More peril in Peril En Pointe by Helen Lipscombe, described as Ballet Shoes meets Murder Most Unladylike. The novel has a relatable protagonist and a surprising reveal. A series to watch.

The Last Spell Breather by Julie Pike delves deep into fantasy, as main character Rayne discovers more about the magic that keeps her village safe. A wholly original idea with a great mother/daughter dynamic, and a sense that magic and darkness pervade everything. Well crafted.

Ben Davis often makes me laugh, whether it’s a one line tweet or a whole novel. What’s That in Dog Years? is a tender book about losing a dog but gaining perspective. Part narrated by owner, part by dog, this is a heartfelt and touching book about friendships and families with a mystery at its heart, and a bucketful of humour. Makes the reader laugh and cry.

Stewart Foster’s Check Mates offers a surprising twist and marries ADHD, chess and the Stasi. It’s a longer, slower read, but merits rewards to those who stick the course with superbly drawn characters and a great reveal.

Halo Moon by Sharon Cohen is an easy read, but the short sharp chapters belie a degree of profundity in its message. Blending two disparate cultures – Ageze in Ethiopia and Halo in Yorkshire, Cohen uses the stars to navigate her protagonists towards each other and avert a disaster. Told with aplomb, this is a hope-filled, inspiring story.

Fleur Hitchcock’s The Boy Who Flew has an explosive opening and immerses the reader in Bath during the Georgian era. It’s dark and inventive, and leads the reader in a twisty mystery involving flying machines and shadowy villainy.

A much more down-to-earth mystery in A Girl Called Justice by Elly Griffiths, also set in the past, this time the 1930s, in which the heroine is sent to boarding school, where crimes and misdeeds need investigating. From an experienced adult crime writer, this is a delight, with common room gossip, games in the rain, and a Christmas play, and although the ingredients feel old, the result is fresh and lively, and will be devoured in one day by competent readers.

Scavengers by Darren Simpson is for those looking for something completely different. It’s a coming-of-age that’s gritty, clever and brave. With a sort of wild abandon, this novel shows how far an imagination can go, and there’s a terrific undertone of tenderness and empathy.

I was blown away by Vashti Hardy’s Brightstorm last year, and this year Wildspark: A Ghost Machine Adventure is another success. A sort of steampunk mechanical adventure, reminiscent of Tin by Padraig Kenny and Peter Bunzl’s Cogheart, this has a particular focus on dealing with grief, and the things that drive us. Hardy is most adept at creating new worlds and absorbing the reader with superb detail.

As climate change dominates the young generation’s thoughts, Sita Brahmachari’s timely Where The River Runs Gold explores a dystopian future of rations and compounds, in which children labour to pollinate the crops. But of course, there is hope amid the inequality and deprivation. Dense and thoughtful.

If you’re just after some short stories – the Return to Wonderland anthology brings some of the very best modern children’s writers together in a mission to re-imagine Alice and her Wonderland.

YA

YA (novels for 12+ years)

It’s rare for a book to catch the attention of both my older children – but William Sutcliffe’s The Gifted, the Talented and Me was whipped through by both, each stopping only to roar with laughter. Light and humorous, this satire of a modern middle-class family who go to live in Hampstead hits all the right spots.

Slightly darker but also an accessible read is Because of You by Eve Ainsworth, a dyslexia-friendly story about family dysfunction and learning to live with a parent’s new partner. Ainsworth excels at getting inside the head of a teen, particularly a victim of bullies, and this is an emotionally astute short novel.

Rose Interrupted by Patrice Lawrence is another tale that invokes social media, so important to today’s teens, but it explores it from a different angle, as Rose and brother Rudder have escaped from a religious sect and are coming at it anew. How do you navigate this new world where everything is so alien? A coming-of-age that uses a new approach to show us the perils of modern life, and how we work out who we really are.

Lastly, The Boxer by Nikesh Shukla is a brilliant exploration of the psyche. Told over the course of the rounds of a boxing fight, with flashbacks, this is a fantastic read about a seventeen-year-old who feels disengaged, but finds a community and a purpose. With themes of radicalisation, violence and belonging, this is an essential teen read.

non fiction

Nonfiction

Three completely different reads here. Be a Super Awesome Photographer by Henry Carroll gives 20 photo challenges for the budding photographer, with real photographs to illustrate and inspire, and ideas for tasks to make different and interesting photos. We’ll be using it on our summer holiday.

Incredible Journeys by Levison Wood, illustrated by Sam Brewster is an informative and inspirational large-size book about famous explorers. With illustrated maps and full page illustrations, this book travels from The Silk Road to Zheng He, and all the way to Nellie Bly and into space.

Watched too much Love Island? A modern and relevant book for teens is Body Brilliant by Nicola Morgan. It takes the reader through the steps to embracing a positive body image. Morgan provides data, encourages taking challenges to make her points and inspire confidence, and aims to change mindsets. Common sense goes hand-in-hand with examples and explanations.

glitchLastly, a graphic novel for you – the only one that dropped in my mailbox this summer, but anyway, Glitch by Sarah Graley would be a good choice. Ever since Aha’s Take On Me, we’ve dreamed of entering into our own comic. Here, 14-year-old Izzy, the protagonist, is depicted in a comic, but enters into her video game. But what happens when she gets Game Over? Great bright visuals, humorous too.

Well that should keep you busy reading over the summer! Come back in September for ballerinas in Russia, furious teens, prison camps, 1870’s opera houses, shadows in the woods and frosty hearts.

Butterflies for the Big Butterfly Count

Ever since The Very Hungry Caterpillar, and probably even before, primary school children have been enthralled with the life cycle of the butterfly. Who could fail to be inspired by the miracle of nature that turns a wormy looking caterpillar into a beautifully coloured flying insect?

the butterfly houseKaty Flint and Alice Pattulo have captured some of the butterfly wonder in their non-fiction book, The Butterfly House.

By creating a narrative around an imaginary butterfly house, which encompasses species from all sorts of habitats – mountains, rainforests, deserts, meadows and more, the author illustrator team invite the reader to actively participate in their nonfiction adventure.

The book begins with a couple of introductory pages exploring how butterflies feed, the difference between moths and butterflies and of course, ‘the hatchery’. It then showcases families page by page, from brush-footed to swallowtails, metalmarks, and so on.

Each page has clearly labelled illustrated examples of species within each family, and an introductory paragraph with facts and identifying features to help the reader to recognise them.

The illustrations are exquisitely beautiful and detailed; they seem rather traditional, which makes sense for an illustrator who has worked for brands such as Crabtree and Evelyn and The V&A – the butterflies feel as carefully drawn as one would handle them.

The narrative is friendly as well as informative, resulting in the perfect non-fiction to pique interest on the subject. You can buy it here.

how to be a butterflyHow to be a Butterfly by Laura Knowles and Catell Ronca is aimed at an even younger audience, but neatly packs information about butterflies into a narrative that asks how we define them.

For example, to be a butterfly you need to have dazzlingly bold colours, and examples are provided, or subtle delicate colours – and then further examples are given. The book contains just a sentence or two on each page, but manages to explore the parts of the body, size, wings, camouflage, breeding and more, in a lyrical, poetic way.

Of course, in telling the text in this way, the author crafts a narrative that promotes diversity – there are many different ways to be a butterfly and all have value, giving a very subtle message about ourselves too.

Each page is set against a pale background, which feels airy and light and gives the colour wash of the butterflies plenty of contrast. These butterflies are painted rather than drawn as above, but equally well delineated, so that each shown species is clear in colour and pattern – and labelled too. You can buy it here.

Both books are well produced, support early years curriculum on mini-beasts and fit well with The Big Butterfly Count, taking place in the UK between 19 July and 11 August.

Toppsta Summer Reading Bingo: A Guest Post

I may read children’s books (as every adult should), but I write my reviews of them for adults – interested librarians, schoolteachers, parents, grandparents, carers and those within the industry. The idea is that they’ll purchase them for the school library, or their child or grandchild, and hopefully recommend to others (and even sneak a read themselves).

For other reviewers and websites, it’s the children they wish to attract. Toppsta is one such website, hosting reviews by children for children. Here, Georgina Atwell, Founder of Toppsta, shares how the website works and introduces the Toppsta Summer Reading Bingo pack.

Georgina Atwell photo

Georgina Atwell and children

I’m always on the lookout for fun ways to get kids reading. Since having my own children, I’ve seen the benefits of reading regularly but it can be hard to fit it all in with school work, after school activities and the lure of screen time. But if we can make it more fun and more sociable then we’re half way there.

We do that in a variety of ways on our website https://toppsta.com. With over 45,000 reviews it’s become a vibrant community of readers, making peer-to-peer recommendations but our new reviewers often come to the website through our free book giveaways. I can see that the kids love the thrill of entering a competition, the joy of winning, and then the anticipation as they wait for the book to be delivered. By the time the book arrives, the child is already excited about reading it.

Then, when they review the book, their review is published on the website for everyone to see and there’s no judgement about how fast they read the book, whether they liked it or not, or even if other people like their review. There’s no “Like” button as such and that provides an open and welcoming environment for children.

So when a friend mentioned how her kids play “Reading Bingo” during the summer holidays my ears perked up. A fun way to try new books, a satisfying list to tick off and a prize to motivate them. It sounded like a winning combination and as a busy working parent, a great way to keep the kids busy over the summer.

I talked to a lot of parents about what they’d like to see in the pack and it was clear that variety was the key. Once I’d established six book categories, I made a list of books I thought would work well and asked publishers to submit their suggestions too. The result is a 12-page Toppsta Summer Reading Bingo pack, bursting with book recommendations, which is free to download from our website and the perfect resource for keeping primary school children entertained throughout the summer holidays.

The competition works like this:

And then you have some other fun things to tick off too, like…

  • Read a book in the dark with a torch
  • Read on a Wednesday
  • Read outside in a den

Once you have crossed off all the boxes, write down the name of each book you have read on the lines provided and either email it to us georgina@toppsta.com or send a copy to:

Georgina Atwell
266 Banbury Road
PO Box 272 (Toppsta)
Oxford
OX2 7DL

We released the pack at the beginning of July so that teachers (particularly in Scotland who break up before schools in England) could share it in the end-of-year wind down. We’ve also added in a couple of fun extra bingo cards for Roald Dahl, who is one of the most popular authors on the website and Dork Diaries as we have a huge fanbase for this series.

For those children who want to write a longer review, we have a handy book review template available to download from our website. I find that sitting down to write a book review is a great way to find your next book. If a child can communicate why they did or didn’t enjoy a book, it’s so much easier to find them something else to read, as well as being a great way to increase their descriptive vocabulary.

Every complete entry we receive will be entered into a competition to win a Smiggle voucher worth £50 and we have two prizes up for grabs. It’s the first time we’ve offered a non-book prize for a competition but I know just how much children love this shop so I thought it might encourage more reluctant readers to give the competition a try.

We’ve had a great reaction so far – over 1,000 downloads in the first 48 hours so I can’t wait to see the entries when they come in and see which books the children have read. If you’d like to take part, it’s easy to join in, just download the pack and get reading!

With thanks to Georgina Atwell. Let’s encourage children’s reading over the summer. Look out on Wednesday 31st July for MinervaReads summer book recommendations.

Fly Me to the Moon

July 20th 2019 is the 50th anniversary of the moon landing. Along with a myriad of events to celebrate, including an exhibition at the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, London, podcasts and programmes, children’s publishers have gone to town (or rather the moon and back) with a plethora of books.

field trip to the moon

Field Trip to the Moon by John Hare and Jeanne Willis manages to achieve a little of everything in one small picture book, tackling gender discrimination, aligning creativity and science, showing exploration and integration, all using wit as the primary force.

On a class trip to the moon, one student is inadvertently separated from the rest of her group, but she doesn’t panic, she takes out her crayons and draws.

However, this rhyming tale isn’t narrated by her, but by the unseen aliens watching this party of space-suited school children. And it is the alien narrators who are shocked, and then delighted when she spies them and shares her crayons.

The wit is everywhere, in text and pictures, skillfully done as the reader doesn’t see any human facial expressions until the end (being underneath the space helmet) – the illustrations bear out mood and feelings in body language alone. The text is playful and clever, the aliens learning about this visiting species through observation, and the landscape is spectacularly evoked in cinematic style, the crayons and space bus providing the colour against the grey moon. Interestingly published in the States as a wordless picture book, here Jeanne Willis’s text gives more colour and texture to the book.

A lesson in grit and resilience, in learning new skills, and in not desecrating a special place.

astro girl

More girls on the moon in Astro Girl by Ken Wilson-Max, which tells the story of Astrid, a girl who wishes to be an astronaut, and has a passion for stars and space. This lovely early-years picture book explores Astrid’s passion within a domestic sphere as she explores the every day with her father, thinking about how what they are doing relates to outer space – eating meals, discussing gravity, science experiments and more. There’s a neat twist at the end – the mum comes home from her job as an astronaut. Black-outlined colourful illustrations set this book firmly within preschool territory, with a lovely timeline of women in space at the back.

the darkest dark

The Darkest Dark by Chris Hadfield and Kate Fillion, illustrated by the Fan Brothers shows a young boy playing at being an astronaut, complete with cardboard box and companion dog. The illustrations are reminiscent of Whatever Next by Jill Murphy, but this boy’s adventures stop when it gets dark and he’s scared, so wants his parents. The illustrations gradually make the reader realise that this book delves into history – the small boy lives in the 1960’s and he goes next door to watch the moon landings on television. He discovers that the dark is powerful and magical and transformative, and when he grows up, his dreams of being a spaceman come true. This longer picture book exquisitely juxtaposes the highly detailed landscape of Chris’s childhood years in the domestic sphere, before opening out into a faintly glowing lunar landscape of his adulthood. Accessible and aspirational.

counting on katherine

For more about people on the moon, an excellent child’s title is Counting on Katherine by Helaine Becker, illustrated by Dow Phumiruk, exploring how Katherine Johnson (profiled in the film Hidden Figures) put astronauts on the moon with her phenomenal maths skills. Another inspirational title, this is about working hard, nurturing passion and believing in yourself. Telling Katherine’s life story, the book highlights the racial prejudice she suffered, and also gender discrimination, yet explores how she battled both, putting the mathematics ahead of all else. The book also explains some of the maths Katherine used, and why it was so important in relation to the moon landings. An important and attractive STEM title.

trailblazers neil armstrong

A longer read, Stripes Publishers new Trailblazers series aims to make biographies accessible and engaging for younger readers, and succeeds. Trailblazers: Neil Armstrong by Alex Woolf, illustrated by Luisa Uribe, George Ermos and Nina Jones starts with a wide-ranging introduction to explain the build-up to the moonlandings and the space race, and then goes back to Armstrong’s childhood, highlighting his love for reading and then his part in the Korean War, before turning to his training with NASA. Although the text is slightly plodding, and it brushes over the prejudice experienced by those such as Katherine Johnson, for avid fans this will be a fascinating extension of their knowledge of Armstrong. Black and white illustrations throughout.

what is the moon

For extremely young readers, What is the Moon? Usborne Lift-the-flap Very First Questions and Answers by Katie Daynes, illustrated by Marta Alvarez Miguens should tick the boxes. Creative, informative and unbearably addictive, this hardy book addresses some quite tricky concepts in an intriguing way. The changing shapes of the moon, (and why it seems to change shape), how it moves and what makes it shine are all worthy questions and answered neatly and deftly. A considerable diverse cast makes this a stand out book for quick facts and fun reading.

how to be an astronaut

If you still really want to be an astronaut at eight years old though, How to Be An Astronaut and other space jobs by Dr Sheila Kanani and Sol Linero is phenomenally informative, colourful and child-friendly. I have a penchant for books that ask ‘why’, as well as what and how, and this book aims to gently explore why we want to research outer space and even visit it. Illustrating the history of space exploration with a timeline, showing the ISS with captions, and exploring not only astronaut training, but what it feels like to go into space. Paragraphs are spaced out among full page illustrations, the topics of ‘mission control’ and ‘space scientists’ are given detailed explanations, which verges into beginners’ physics, and yet the information is simply elucidated. A key space title. The paperback version includes a press-out-and-make rocket, stickers and fold-out space scenes.

balloon to the moon

Balloon to the Moon by G Arbuthnott and C Nielsen takes a different tack, tracking the era of space exploration back to ancient dreams of flight through the invention of kites in China and the hot air balloon in France. Before long, the book hits its stride with rockets, and plunges into supersonics, animals in space through to astronauts and the lunar landings, and continues beyond with the future of space exploration. With a mix of timelines, narrative, deconstructed rocket illustrations and even comics, this retro-feeling title, with its screen print illustration certainly answers the whys as well as the hows. The vintage feel with chapter heads as retro-style posters makes this an immersive as well as authoritative read.

usborne book of the moon

The Usborne Book of the Moon by Laura Cowan, illustrated by Diana Toledano shows how many different ways there are to present moon information to children. This title presents common questions – Is the moon made of cheese, does a man live on the moon – and gives answers, based first on what ancient peoples believed and the importance of the moon to different cultures, before documenting the thoughts of historical figures, such as Plutarch and Harriot, and the photographs of Daguerre, until finally landing on the space race and flights to the moon. Colourful and well-presented.

moonstruck

If you’re feeling largely inspired, then Moonstruck! Poems About Our Moon, edited by Roger Stevens, illustrated by Ed Boxall may help to fuel those dreams. From classic to contemporary, the poems address the disinterest of a young child forced to watch the moon landings to Rachel Rooney’s use of the different types of moon – Harvest, Snow, Milk – to Yeats’ exploration of the relationship between night-time cat and moon. Illustrations throughout add shape to the texture of the poems; playing with shape and light to mirror the effects of the moon.

Fashion Fun

With the Christian Dior and Mary Quant exhibitions at the V&A in London, and an increasing awareness of the dangers of disposable fashion, plus an appreciation of the ability of fashion to define an era, an identity, a personality, it feels timely to introduce the study of fashion and clothing to children. I have encouraged my children to learn to sew (something I never mastered), in the hope that they will mend and re-use, rather than succumb to the fashion pitfalls of wearing something only once. For those who prefer to indulge their fashion sense with reading, here are some stunning options – all beautifully produced as one would expect from a fashion book.

planet fashionPlanet Fashion: 100 Years of Fashion History by Natasha Slee and Cynthia Kittler is a large square book bursting with an exuberance and vitality that static pictures often can’t convey.

Here, the illustrations walk the clothes.

There are 25 scenes of fashion history from around the world, capturing the time and place of that moment, in chronological order throughout the book from 1890 to 2012.

The first scene shows a waltz in a ballroom in 1890 in the UK. The captions give a perfect flavour of the era, but also show how carefully the illustrations have been chosen and annotated – there is intense attention to detail within the book, including pointing out how the corset made a ‘pigeon breast’ shape, and how wide necklines accentuated the curve of the shoulder.

Just as every stitch counts in a dress, so every word has been carefully placed here. There is more too, from the hairstyles to the accessories, highlighting both men and women’s fashions.

The 1930s moves to Shanghai where the clothes tended to be figure-hugging with upright Mandarin collars. The scene highlights the street, a bustling metropolis featuring expats as well as residents, modes of transport, and even points to culture and politics in explaining about the movie stars in China, and the rise of the feminist movement.

Further in, readers can compare Bollywood with Hollywood, understand the effects of wartime on fashion, and begin to understand how fashion became a statement.

And at the back, there are some brilliant timelines, featuring moments of political, social and cultural significance as well as timelines dedicated to silhouettes, shoes and bags.

This book is a riot of colour, charm and clothes. A classy reference book for age 8+. You can buy it here.

wonderful world of clothesA younger, more straightforward look at clothes and their uses is The Wonderful World of Clothes by Emma Damon. Ordered completely differently, this is not a historical look at clothes, but a celebration of global fashion, showing cultural diversity, the future of technology in clothes, and the bits and bobs that may seem like trivia, but actually make an outfit.

Damon looks around the world to see what people wear in different climates and why. She then explores the clothes people wear to do different things – whether it’s uniform, sports clothes, equipment for a job, or for religious and celebratory purposes. This is fascinating, stemming from an underwater photographer to a Sikh wedding ceremony.

For me, the real fun came with Damon’s small vignettes about accessories, exploring different types of shoes (tiger slippers and brogues, for example) to jewellery and buttons (the satsuma button stood out, as did her clever instructions on how to wear a kimono and sari).

With bright personable illustrations, and an eclectic gathering of information, this is a unique and quirky book. Highly recommended for children aged 6+ years. You can buy it here.

midnight at moonstoneWhere better to go for clothes information than to Lara Flecker, who worked for 15 years as a Senior Textile Conservation Display Specialist at the aforementioned Victoria and Albert museum in London.

Midnight at Moonstone by Lara Flecker, illustrated by Trisha Krauss is an adventure novel for children aged eight and over, and takes the reader on a journey with Kit, who has gone to stay with her grandfather at Moonstone Manor, a costume museum threatened with closure.

Creative Kit decides she must save the museum, particularly after realising that the costumed mannequins come alive at night, and by persuading them to help under cover of darkness, and encouraging her grandfather that it is worth saving, Kit manages to pull off a feat of some imagination and skill.

With nods to the meaning of teamwork, family, and above all the wonder and usefulness of creativity, this is a marvellous novel.

Moreover, to fully celebrate the costumes, the book is illustrated throughout with modern scenes of Kit, but also the most exquisite capturing of the mannequins donning their costumes, from 18th century silks to Chinese dragon robes, 19th century bustle dresses and more.

Designed with French flaps, and patterned borders around the text, as much love has gone into the production of the book as the writing of it. This is a treasure to look at and read, so much so that I had to buy a finished copy after seeing just a few pages of the proof.

A wonderful paean to the inspiration of costume design and small museums everywhere. You can buy it here.

New Rhyming Picture Books

i really want to winI Really Want to Win by Simon Philip, illustrated by Lucia Gagg
Following on from the Waterstones Children’s Book Prize shortlisted I Really Want the Cake, our heroine is back for Sports Day – excited because she knows she’s going to win, and like any good footballer, has planned her celebration.

But she doesn’t win at Sports Day, and then finds she’s not winning at spelling competitions either, nor art prizes nor even a simple game of hide-and-seek. There’s another girl who seems to pick up every trophy (isn’t there always one!) Even when this rival doesn’t achieve top prize, she congratulates the winner graciously. Our heroine is less than gracious.

There are numerous lessons here; one that it’s the enjoyment of the journey, the taking part, that matters, but also, and nicely conceived, is the message that one can’t be good at everything, but everyone has a skill. However, rather than being preachy, it ends with our heroine winning something she’s good at…

It’s not just the fabulous rhythm and rhyming that makes this book great, (some text picked out in large capitals for emphasis, so that it feels as if the girl’s effort is in convincing the reader as well as herself) although these attributes are impeccable. The illustrations are faultless too – the earnestness, desire and straining of the little girl communicated through every picture. Her rival is simply hilarious, winking at the reader, her tummy straining over her shorts when she wins tug of war, her poise as a dancer smug, her posture exemplary.

There is so much to love about this book – the other classmates, the mass of trophies, the utter frustration of the little girl wanting to win, and the incremental detail of her small dog offering comfort, support, and sympathy as the book progresses. An absolute winner.  You can win (buy) here.

tooth fairy in trainingTooth Fairy in Training by Michelle Robinson, illustrated by Briony May Smith
Another fantastic pairing in the picture book world, as Michelle Robinson spins another rhyme about a popular subject, joined by the exquisitely folksy illustrations of May Smith, all lovingly produced inside a full-on iridescent cover that shimmers and shines as any tooth fairy’s wings would.

May is in training to be a tooth fairy, and is taken out by her big sister on ‘collecting’ missions. The issue is that it is not just humans who lose teeth, and so she has to make her way around crafty crocodiles, snakes and sharks. But of course, her most dangerous moment comes in the human’s house.

Briony May has gone to town on her fairy tropes with toadstools, large strawberries, a bed in a matchbox, an array of fairy dust-strewn pages – a definite harking to the days of the flower fairies. This is a fairy world well-imagined with intense attention to detail, and the wonder of teeth in jars, all set in a world gently coloured with the warmth of a yellow light, and the night-time purple streaked with the pink contrails of fairy flight.

Swishes and wishes, keepers and sleepers, the rhymes work well, the rhythm is great for those ‘out-loud’ reads. If you’ve ever had to help out the tooth fairy, or forgotten (oh no), then this book will help explain that sometimes tooth fairies are extremely busy! Find a tooth fairy here.

the runaway peaThe Runaway Pea by Kjartan Poskitt, illustrated by Alex Willmore
Peas have had a bad rap in picture books ever since Evil Pea was created by Sue Hendra, but this friendly Pea is the one who has escaped from the plate, rolled onto the floor and is in search of fun.

It doesn’t start well though, splatting into sauce, plopping into the dog bowl, narrowly escaping being burnt to death in the toaster, before ending up under the fridge with a marvellous host of mouldy other escapees. All should be lost, except that Pea has a surprise ending (due in part to the cleaner of the kitchen and their green awareness!)

This is a clever, witty rhyming book, perfect for read-aloud storytime, that not only increases vocabulary, tells a funny story and will have children laughing, but also ends with an environmental message.

Illustrated by Alex Wilmore, with an eye for cartoon expression and characterisation, each page takes the simple shapes of the kitchen and fashions a whole landscape from them, imbuing the fruit and vegetables with telling facial expressions. Fun, fast and imaginative, Runaway Pea rivals Evil Pea. It is, to quote the publishers, definitely appealing. Run away with a pea here.

Picture Book Round Up: Human Relationships

When I was at school, one of my best friends had the most extraordinary hair. Tight springy curls that fuzzed out from her head like Medusa with her snakes. Now, in the school library, I’m all agog at the number of different hairstyles, the fancy braiding, curls escaping from scrunchies and bobbles. But also the different personalities of the children – just like picture books they come in all shapes and sizes. Here are some latest picture books about humans and human relationships.

miras curly hairMira’s Curly Hair by Maryam Al Serkal, illustrated by Rebeca Luciani
Mira has the same problem as my school friend. Her hair curls everywhere, and it won’t stop. She wants someone with whom she can identify, but her mother has luscious straight hair, of which Mira is a little envious. Mira tries to stop her curls unfurling in all sorts of ways, but they won’t. It’s only after a rainfall when her mother’s hair springs back to its natural curls, that Mira feels happier.

Set in Dubai, with its beauty as the backdrop to Mira’s life, this is a book that begins firmly in the domestic sphere – Mira doing a handstand in her room, Mira’s mother’s table with laptop, glasses and flowers – and out of the window the scenery of palm trees and sea, of the cityscape. The illustrations come into their own when they escape the domestic sphere, just as Mira’s mother’s hair escapes its restrictions and returns to its natural state in the rain – here the illustrations show the range of patterns on clothes, on the pavements, in the rain, and the characters seem uplifted by the fresh rain’s scene -their faces upturned. The backdrop changes to one of traditional Islamic architecture and across the pages stream colourful birds, perhaps real, perhaps imagined, as they fly through the mother’s hair, they also experiencing freedom.

The colours in this book zing – it’s vibrant, bright, the rain makes the natural landscape appear lush and sensual. This is a lovely book of acceptance of who you are, seeing yourself in others, and also understanding that there is no perfect way for hair to be – misnomers such as ‘unruly’, and ‘misbehaving’ to describe hair have no place here. Instead, a natural head of hair is to be celebrated. You can buy it here. 

the wall in the middle of the bookThe Wall in the Middle of the Book by Jon Agee
Modern fables tell us much about our own political times, and any book with the word ‘wall’ in the title conjures ideas of division and animosity, but mostly fear. Cities were originally built with walls around them to keep people out, not to keep people in. Agee cleverly uses the physical space of the book to build his wall – the wall runs along the centre gutter of the book. On one side, (verso), a young knight explains exactly the purpose of his wall – it’s to keep out the dangerous animals (tiger, rhino, gorilla and mouse pictured on the recto). And the most dangerous thing of all – the ogre.

When the knight’s side of the book fills up with water though, he’s plucked to safety over the top of the wall by the ogre. And discovers that the recto side is actually quite pleasant. Agee breaks the ‘fourth wall’ of fiction – addressing the reader and acknowledging the ‘book’ as his setting – thus eliminating all boundaries entirely. The book challenges our pre-conceived ideas of what’s frightening ‘without’, when actually the threats may come from ‘within’. And also, asks the reader if our knight is the most reliable of narrators.

Illustrations are full-page, blocky, simple yet exceedingly expressive. Text matches in its apparent simplicity, yet stimulates thought. All excellent food for thought in these wall-building times. You can buy it here. 

goliathGoliath: The Boy Who was Different by Ximo Abadia
Brighter colours here, using primary colours with spots of green and black in recognisable but also blocky illustrations that feel almost like retro jigsaw pieces fitted together, in this story of being different.

The boy, our new Goliath, is huge and red and doesn’t fit in. In despair he sets off on a quest to discover why, and it is the moon who offers perspective on the problem, explaining that it is both big and small depending on who is looking at it.

The story of perception is not new, but it is the artwork that dazzles here.

The illustrations themselves present the issue of perspective – a forceful display of shapes and lines that form images within the reader’s mind, the bold strange shape of the boy contrasted with the normality of a silhouette reading a newspaper, children with backpacks walking to school.

In the end, the boy’s acceptance of himself, leads the others to accept him too, and rather than he grow more like them, the illustrations show that they become more like him in colour and shape. Fascinating and like Goliath himself, different. You can buy it here. 

the bandit queenThe Bandit Queen by Natalia and Lauren O’Hara
Another most distinctive picture book, this latest tale from the O’Hara sisters is stylish, clever and subversive. There’s something quite delightful about renegades, naughtiness and bad behaviour in children’s books. My Naughty Little Sister and Horrid Henry of course, but also in AA Milne’s delicious rhymes, the spoilt behaviour of Mary Jane, Christopher Robin lying about his wheezles, and those two little bears who lived in the wood, one of whom was bad and the other good.

Here, a crew of bandits are incredibly naughty, making noise through the night, peeing without precision, throwing cutlery. Yet, they face a challenge when they break into an orphanage, steal socks and clocks, a picnic box, and inadvertently, a baby! She becomes their Bandit Queen, but after a while their antics begin to grate on her, and maybe she’ll have to hatch a plan to change their ways.

This clever rhyming book contains some interesting morals within, discussions about routine and learning, about friends and family. And belonging and greed. There’s a huge amount within this characterful picture book, and the illustrations are simply exquisite – with an old-fashioned feel that makes it seem like it’s worthy of longevity. You can buy it here. 

grobblechopsGrobblechops by Elizabeth Laird and Jenny Lucander
Using tales from old is another way of making a book a ‘classic’, but this modern update of a tale by Rumi, the 13th century poet and Sufi mystic, is both appealing and refreshing. It does revisit the themes of childhood fears (monsters at bedtime), and parental persuasion, but it stands out with its careful observations of how we live now. Amir is scared of the monster. The monster is illustrated with fang teeth and sticky-up hair, yet with a kind of beguiling cuteness behind the horror. (It’s all the eyes.)

The whole book is told in dialogue between child and father, Amir at first suggesting how monstrous the monster will be and the father explaining how he will defend Amir against him, but gradually the talk becomes more about how to occupy the monster called Grobblechops, even suggesting that he may need sympathy, perhaps suffering loneliness or envy of Amir.

Parents too will enjoy the attention to detail – the father’s laptop, his need for ‘evening time’ with his wife, the domestic scenes. With humour throughout and also such compelling illustrations, the reader feels totally drawn into the tale. In essence, warm and comforting for those with night-time anxieties. You can buy it here. 

Great Guinea Pigs!

harry stevensonFleabag might seem quite a leap from children’s books, but when The Adventures of Harry Stevenson by Ali Pye arrived on my desk, I saw the link straight away. Guinea Pigs. A sometimes symbol of loneliness (guinea pigs like their buddies), the guinea pig is a great creature for children because even the name itself is a bit of a conundrum – they’re not from Guinea and they’re not pigs.

The Adventures of Harry Stevenson is a younger fiction title told from the point of view of Harry, Billy’s guinea pig. Like some other popular titles for this age group, there are two stories within the one book, both highly illustrated in neon orange as if Harry is a little radioactive or glow-in-the-dark. He isn’t a radioactive super-powered guinea pig, but he does have some remarkably outlandish adventures for a pet that mainly likes to eat and sleep.

In the first story, Billy and his family move house. Pye plays on the idea of the lost pet during a house move – a cage escapee, and the story brought back memories of Topsy and Tim Move House in which their cat escapes from the car en route to their new house (Topsy blames Tim). Here, Harry has no one to blame but his own greed, but due to some ingenuity, bravery, and the haplessness of pizza delivery drivers, he does make it back to Billy.

After the implausibility of this, story two is almost easier to believe, if you can picture Harry suspended in balloon strings and floating away from Billy’s birthday party to land in the middle of a football stadium during a cup final.

But for all the ridiculousness of his adventures, what grounds these stories is the familiarity of Billy’s worries and joys, the normality of Harry’s hunger, and the friendliness of the tone – it’s as cuddly as stroking a guinea pig.

With inclusions of a diverse family setting, and one that isn’t affluent, references to an imaginary local football team, this is certainly a zany and slightly surreal addition to the younger fiction market, but much needed and hugely enjoyable. This is, in part, because Pye makes the stories pacey and action-filled, despite some initial scene-setting.

Pye’s initial foray into the world of children’s literature was picture books, and her illustrations here represent Harry’s character well – they are scrappy and look simple, but actually manage to portray a depth of emotion and movement.

Some cute factual details at the end illuminate that guinea pigs shouldn’t really be kept as lone creatures, as they do get lonely.

And it’s this theme that pervades the book. Billy worries about making new friends on moving house, and who he should invite to his party, but he’s not lonely, and friends rally. Harry isn’t lonely because he has the committed love and loyalty of Billy. There’s a warmth that exudes here – a humorous tale that aims to show children overcoming fears of shyness and loneliness, whilst also offering the tranquility achieved by being alone with their pet – or their book! For newly independent readers, age 5-8+. You can buy it here.

Animal Picture Books

There seems to be a glut of super-talented authors and illustrators bringing a range of stories to life this summer in picture books. It’s hard to choose when there are so many good books. Themed on animals, and with some clear references to great picture books of the past, I’ve narrowed it down to seven.

a mouse called julianA Mouse Called Julian by Joe Todd-Stanton
Since the stunning views of Epping Forest inspired the illustrative detail in Jill Barklem’s Brambly Hedge series, a fascination with underground burrows and attention to detail has pervaded children’s illustration. Todd-Stanton’s new picture book is also about a mouse and his burrow, illustrated to near-perfection with its perspective on size – the giant matchsticks, safety pen and chiselled pencils. And as the perspective widens outside Julian’s burrow, the picturebook excels.

Julian avoids other animals, but when a fox tries to sneak into his burrow, it gets stuck in the front door. At first horror strikes both animals, but gradually a mutual friendship grows.

This plot idea may be borrowed from Winnie-the-Pooh, but Todd-Stanton’s clever vignettes of Julian on his everyday travails, through burrow and fields, plays on the reader’s expectations of country life, predator and prey. Julian is seen walking with a stick of blueberries across his shoulder, in the pose of Dick Whittington with his bindle stick. The illustrations open out to full page little animal terror, as the reader sees the eye of the fox, huge against the leaves and dandelions, which themselves tower over Julian.

This is a tale, in the end, about perspective. Perspective of size, of danger, but also of companionship and the loyalty of friendship. There are unexpected twists, a sublime amount of suspense for the young reader, and simply exquisite illustrations. A gentle rhythm to the short text amplifies the satisfactory ending. Exquisite. You can buy it here.

in the swamp by the light of the moonIn the Swamp by the Light of the Moon by Frann Preston-Gannon
More borrowing from the children’s literature cannon in this paean to The Owl and the Pussycat by Edward Lear, as Preston-Gannon uses the same rhythm to tell her tale of a frog and his orchestra of animals. Singing to himself in the swamp, his song feels incomplete until the other animals join in. It is only at the end, when even the smallest voice is heard, that the music sounds right.

With collage illustrations highlighting the different textures and bold colours of the swamp, from the flora at the front of the picture to the depth of water and colourful fish, Preston-Gannon shows an intense attention to detail, making the scene feel like the liveliest and most comfortable swamp – the frog’s legs dip into the water, the mice sing with every whisker and flick of tail.

In the end, the reader discovers that it is only with the complementary sounds of all the creatures that the song sounds good – a promotion of inclusivity, but particularly of the little bug – the smallest voice of all – showing that there must be space for the extroverts to listen to the introverts and let them in.

Young readers will find the little bug on every page, and delight in her final ‘brightness’ of song. Lyrical, accessible and bright. You can buy it here.

ducktective quack
Ducktective Quack and the Cake Crime Wave by Claire Freedman and Mike Byrne
Humour and detective skills galore in this wonderful caper by the author of Aliens Love Underpants. Someone is stealing all the cakes in town, and together with Ducktective Quack, the reader needs to work out who it is. In rhyming text, and with successful word play (‘fowl play’ at the police station), the book takes the reader through a humorous investigation of the town, from the crime scene to the portraits of suspects, questioning and solution. A yellow post-it on each page encourages the reader to find clues.

But it is the clever rhyming and busy illustrations that win an audience. A perfect read-aloud, with cute messages about sugary foods being bad for teeth and health, the illustrations of the different animals and their professional lives will make any reader chuckle, even the grownups. Look out for the incongruities too – an old-fashioned telephone, an American mailbox, an electric toothbrush, a takeaway coffee cup.

Timeless and placeless, this is one sugary treat. You can buy it here.

i am a tiger
I Am a Tiger by Karl Newson and Ross Collins
Say something with enough conviction and people will believe you? A tale for our times indeed. This bold, simple picturebook, again with a starring role for a mouse, shows that with enough confidence you can be anything you want to be. Mouse believes itself to be a tiger, and convinces others of this ‘fact’ by way of a series of strong(ish) arguments and behaviours. When a real tiger comes along, mouse has to convince tiger that the tiger himself is a mouse, before explaining what all the other animals are (with some witty surprises).

This is an excellent book, highlighting confidence, truth and debate, all the while managing to amuse. Phenomenal facial expressions take this book to another level. You can buy it here.

my dog mouse
My Dog Mouse by Eva Lindstrom
Old-school illustrations in this translated-from-Swedish slowly paced gentle book about friendship and ownership. There’s a special attention and a special relationship between the unnamed narrator who is taking an old dog for a walk, illuminated in the poetic language of the text ‘ears flap like flags’, ears that are ‘as thin as pancakes’, but mainly in the soft charming shaded illustrations that move as slowly as the child moves in his slow walk, ‘Step, pause, step pause.’

There’s a longing and poignancy to the text, a kind of nostalgia for the enduring time of childhood, and a wry sadness as the narrator proclaims that they wished the dog belonged to them, in beautiful contrast to the title of the story. Will leave children pondering. You can buy it here.

little bear's spring
Little Bear’s Spring by Elli Woollard and Briony May Smith
There is a great depth of understanding of nature in May Smith’s illustrations throughout her picture book output, and this is different only in that it concentrates on the real natural world rather than fairies. Little Bear is coming out of hibernation and Woollard and May Smith track his slow awareness of the new world and the change from winter to spring as he learns whom to trust and whom to befriend.

The use of light to show the sunshine and the passing of the days, shadows cast, and patches illuminated, as well as the textures of the landscape; tree bark, animal fur, rippling streams is magical, and particularly, of course, the double page spread of first blossoming flowers – a carpet of colour and sensory delight. The story is gently told with a good mix of descriptive vocabulary and character-driven dialogue all told in rhyme. You can buy it here.

big cat
Big Cat by Emma Lazell
A case of mistaken identity, a stylistic throwback nostalgia to the 1970s, and an acknowledgement of great picture books from the past combine in this zany intergenerational story book. Isobel and her grandma find a cat in the garden – a big cat – whilst looking for grandma’s glasses. He moves in, but like another well-known big cat, eats a lot of food. When grandma finally finds her glasses, she’s in for quite a surprise.

With a messy, scatty illustrative style, busy chaotic scenes, and a wonderful chattiness in the text, there is a huge amount of fun to discover in this lively picture book. Look at the other cats protesting, Grandma attempting to text on her mobile phone, and her overloaded kitchen (how many mugs does one person need?) A Big amount of fun. You can buy it here.

Refugee Week Books

Refugee Week starts this week, with the slogan ‘Different Pasts, Shared Future’. It’s a theme well worth bearing in mind in our current climate, especially if you read this article in The Observer from 9th June, which pointed to the increased number of war refugees, and the growing threat of climate change that will result (and already is) in an increased number of climate migrants.

One hopes that the next generation will use their passion and skills to solve some of these issues, be it understanding different political, ethnic and religious tensions, or coping with the displacement of people due to changing climate. Even, one hopes, to reverse some of these changes, but ultimately to accept the global movement of people.

Teaching tolerance starts young. Two picture books that provoke thought and understanding about accepting others’ differences, and learning to embrace others in new communities, are aimed at the very young – The Suitcase by Chris Naylor-Ballesteros, and Quill Soup by Alan Durant and Dale Blankenaar.

migrationsBut firstly, there is the striking little Migrations: Open Hearts Open Borders with an introduction by Shaun Tan. This postcard sized-book is a selection of illustrations from children’s book illustrators around the world. The illustrators submitted images for a travelling exhibition (visiting London, Worcester, South Africa, Korea), to express support for human migrants. Each illustrator submitted an illustration of a bird on a postcard, and a message on the reverse.

The book highlights the intense difference in style between children’s illustrators – from those well-known in this country, such as Chris Riddell and Petr Horacek, to the lesser-known Marija Prelog from Slovenia. She has etched a beautiful red-breasted bullfinch, whose claws and facial expression look it to be in some kind of distress – the ‘clouds’ in the sky resembling shadowy human figures that might be swimming or struggling through the air. It’s a powerful arresting image. Myungae Lee from Korea has colourfully crafted birds as a series of balloons held by people on the ground with their arms raised – turning the postcard vertically to use the space.

Divided into themes: Departures, Long Journeys, Arrivals, and Hope for the Future, the book is both inspirational and thought-provoking. Migration, of course, is tied up with ideas of journey, destination, flight and discovery – just like children’s fiction.

And also like children’s fiction, it has hope pulling the strands of the journey together, a dream of something better. Each journey and illustration is an individual act, but very much part of a whole. The idea – to have to leave one community but to join or form another community in a better, safer place.

You can buy it here.

The idea of community is threaded through the two picture books – both asking for acts of kindness in welcoming strangers.

the suitcaseThe Suitcase by Chris Naylor-Ballesteros is the story of a funny little creature who arrives in the book after trekking over quite a jaggedy mountain, pulling a suitcase.

He looks pretty fed up and tired. The animals at his destination ask him what’s inside his case, but they know he’s fibbing when he explains that as well as a teacup, there is a table and chairs, a house and more. When the stranger curls up and goes to sleep, weary and vulnerable, the other animals break into the suitcase to sate their curiosity.

The inherent message is making amends for doing something wrong, welcoming a stranger, and gaining an understanding of what that stranger has been through. There is an intense lesson of empathy here, which children will gain through the osmosis of reading.

The arrival of the creature at the destination is illustrated with pages of simple colours in a landscape of mainly white space. But the journey is depicted by the landscape dominating the page – from the high mountain to an abundance of waves that threatens to drown the book. A struggle before final acceptance.

Effective in its simplicity. You can buy it here.

quill soup

There’s an old folk tale called Stone Soup, shared commonly in European communities (although it has other global variations) in which a hungry stranger tries to convince the townspeople to share their small morsels of food with him, and in the end makes a meal for the whole community. Sharing is best – breaking bread with strangers who become new friends.

This is the essence of the story in Quill Soup by Alan Durant, illustrated by Dale Blankenaar, but in this retelling the stranger is a porcupine called Noko, and the story has been replanted to Africa – the village populated by an array of African animals including meerkats and monkeys. The style is unique – vivid colours dominating each page, intricate patterns and silhouettes, in active, highly populated scenes, so that a child is almost seeking the animals in the jungle – picking out their shapes and eyes in a teeming patterned landscape.

An excellent retelling that not only teaches about welcoming strangers and sharing resources, but for a Western readership, it shows cultural diversity in the actual design of the book. You can buy it here.