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The More It Snows…

Snow Eastman
This December it’s not quite cold enough for snow, and set to get warmer by the day in London this week. However, for me, the magic of Christmas is still tied to a snowy landscape. There is something special about snow. No other weather creates such a magical environment for a young child. In recent years in London we’ve had on average one ‘snow day’ a year, in which the schools close and it’s free play outside all day. One book from my childhood readily sums up the delight of this day, Snow by Roy McKie and P.D. Eastman. Published in the US as part of the Dr Seuss beginners’ series to learn to read, the basic text and smile-inducing illustrations capture the excitement in a nutshell.

Snow inside Eastman
Tobogganing, skiing, snow angels, snow ball fights, snowman building, igloo building, and of course the ultimate melting are all covered. The verses are simple yet so effective:
“Snow is good
For making tracks…
And making pictures
With your backs.”

Snow is my favourite
More recent offerings also manage to convey the happiness of a snow day, and the inevitable melting. Snow is My Favourite and My Best by Lauren Child in the Charlie and Lola book series manages to express the impatience of a child in wanting to go and play immediately before it all goes away. The tradition of my children having hot chocolate after coming in from a snow day was heavily influenced by this book! There are some important lessons here though, encouraging children to think about how to make something special. Is snow so special because it doesn’t happen every day? Both of these manage to convey the fleetingness of snow.

snow by sam usher

My new favourite is Snow by Sam Usher. From the front cover, it’s already apparent that Sam can conjure an atmosphere with a few simple pen lines. In no other picture book is the tempting flat whiteness of unspoilt snow so cleverly drawn. That impatience to go out, seen earlier in Charlie and Lola, is beautifully manifested in the slapdash hurry to get dressed, brush teeth and tie shoes…all commonly hurried activities in the impatient young. Then a breathtaking spread of pure white in front of the reader, as the snow is in front of the child. However, the book doesn’t let us leap into the snow, because, like the boy in the story we have to wait for his grandpa to be ready and take him – and then when they finally go, after the agony of watching everyone and everything else trample the fresh snow – there’s a great surprise in store. Set to be a children’s classic – I can’t wait for Sam’s next book.

Snow Bears1snow bears inside

From new to old – Snow Bears by Martin Waddell is a simple tale of a mother bear who pretends not to know where her baby bears are because they are all covered in snow and so look different. They play games in the snow, until the little one says its cold and they all go home. For me it’s the page where they return home to eat their toast that really makes me want to hug this book! Sarah Fox Davies’ illustration of the bears illuminated in the warm glow spilling out from the wooden hut sums up that wonderful feeling you only get by going into the warmth after getting cold and wet and breathless in snowy activities. The new pop up version was published in September this year.

Snow Day

Snow Day by Richard Curtis is another addition to the snow canon of picture books. I was very excited about this as it is illustrated by Rebecca Cobb, one of my favourite stars in the world of children’s illustration. The pictures certainly didn’t let me down, especially the army of snowmen, and the empty classroom. The premise is that there is a ‘snow day’ but the worst schoolboy and the strictest teacher don’t get the message (despite the emails and phone calls) and turn up to school.  What could be a miserable day turns into a day of lessons in the snow, and by the end they seem to be good friends. This is definitely a picture book for slightly older children, the length of the book and references to structured lessons ensure this.

Snow Walter de la Mare

My last new book for this Christmas with snowy landscapes is Snow by Walter de la Mare, illustrated by Carolina Rabei. This is a beautiful picture book – the illustrations create a nostalgia for Christmases in peaceful sleepy snowy villages, with happy excited children and a natural landscape of trees and robin red-breasts with no cars or modern city references to spoil the footprints in the snow.
inside snow walter de la mare
The colour adds to the picture perfectness of the book – muted browns and beiges, with splashes of true red for hats and curtains and presents, which bring to life the characters within. The picture of Father Christmas on his sleigh speeding through the swirling snow against a black backdrop sky is truly stunning. However, I can’t help but think that the wonder of the illustrations detracts from the beauty of the poetic words themselves – reading it in isolation conjures more of the magic than read piecemeal sentence by sentence across a book, but if it brings the magic of a great poet into the lives of children I can’t quibble.

Little Honey Bear and the Smiley Moon1

One final mention for a book that is not strictly about snow, but contains a story in a snowy landscape. If you want a bit of glitter on your snow, this is the one for you. (tip: read under electric light). Little Honey Bear and the Smiley Moon by Gillian Lobel, illustrated by Tim Warnes is a common enough tale of friendship – Little Honey Bear sets out to reach the moon with two of his friends, gets lost in the dark, and is finally found by Mummy Bear. However, I love this book for the liberal use of glitter to highlight the illustrations on each page – it brings the magic home for Christmas.

Little Honey Bear and the Smiley Moon

Festival of Lights

I wanted to highlight eight books for the Jewish festival of Chanukah, which starts on Tuesday evening, because that’s how many days the festival lasts. However, I got a bit excited, and found twelve! I don’t think this is a bad thing though, as living in London, I get asked for books that celebrate different faiths and cultures quite frequently, and you can never have too many.

Chanukah celebrates the miracle of an oil lamp lasting for eight nights rather than one, and the rededication of the temple in Jerusalem following the victory of the Jewish Maccabees over the Syrian-Greeks in 165 BC.

My First Hanukkah Board book
For the very youngest in the family I heartily recommend My First Hanukkah Board Book (unashamedly self-promoting here as I wrote this book with Dorling Kindersley). An excellent pictorial introduction to Chanukah, with the story of the festival told in the most basic way and the cultural symbols photographed to ensure a growing familiarity with the festival. The festival’s main song is also included with the Hebrew words spelt out phonetically in English for the youngest reader to follow. Sadly out of print now, but there are some copies floating around.

Eight Candles to Light
Another basic introduction is Eight Candles to Light by Jonny Zucker and Jan Barger Cohen. Simple illustrations rather than photography, and a handy guide to which way to light the candles (for those who forget on the first night every year!). At the back of the book there’s also a text only adaptation of the story of Chanukah, which is one of the clearest I’ve read.

maccabee jamboreemaccabee jamboree inside
Maccabee Jamboree: Hanukkah Countdown by Cheri Holland, illustrated by Roz Shanzer, is a lovely way to celebrate the festival with small children. It’s a simple counting book starting with eight Maccabees, who one by one disappear as they prepare to celebrate Chanukah with a party.
“Five Maccabees cooked latkes
But only four gobbled them up.”

The Only One Club
Some children may find this a particularly difficult time of year, as not celebrating Christmas really marks out their difference; it can be hard to know what to say when strangers in shops ask you ‘What are you hoping for this Christmas?’ and ‘Have you decorated your tree?’. One wonderful book that manages to encapsulate that difficulty and celebrate diversity is The Only One Club by Jane Naliboff, illustrated by Jeff Hopkins. It tells the story of a girl called Jennifer who is the only one in her class who celebrates Hanukkah, and makes Hanukkah decorations whilst everyone else makes decorations for Christmas. Throughout the book though it becomes apparent that everyone has something that is ‘unique’ about them and that each child has their own ‘only one club’ individuality. By the end Jennifer doesn’t feel so ‘marked out’.

Light the LightsDaddy Christmas and Hanukkah Mama
For those who celebrate both Chanukah and Christmas, or Chrismukkah as it’s known in the States, Light the Lights! A Story about Celebrating Hanukkah and Christmas by Margaret Moorman fits the purpose. Totally secular, the story follows Emma and her family as they follow the traditions of first Chanukah and then Christmas, with lights on the chanukiah and then on the Christmas tree. It’s very limited and doesn’t try to explain the significance or story behind either festival, but is a good start for those who celebrate both without adhering to one faith in particular. Also on this theme is Daddy Christmas and Hanukkah Mama by Selina Alko – you can’t get more of a mash-up than the recipe within for cranberry kugel.

Sadie's almost marvellous menorah
My new favourite is Sadie’s Almost Marvellous Menorah by Jamie Korngold, illustrated by Julie Fortenberry. Every child can sympathise with Sadie, who, at school, makes a beautiful menorah out of clay ready for the festival, only to break it on the way home to show her mother! Upset ensues, until Sadie’s clever mother shows her that the ‘helper’ candle – the shamash – which is used to light all the other candles, can still be used to light all the other candles on the family menorahs. If only most children were so easily appeased when their artwork gets destroyed!

A Chanukah Story for Night Number ThreeEngineer Ari and the Hanukkah MishapLots of Latkes

Three books that elucidate some of the qualities of the festival by telling stories are A Chanuka Story for Night Number Three by Dina Rosenfeld, illustrated by Vasilisa and Vitaliy Romanenko, Lots of Latkes by Sandy Lanton and illustrated by Vicki Jo Redenbaugh, and Engineer Ari and the Hanukkah Mishap by Deborah Bodin Cohen, illustrated by Shahar Kober.

A Chanukah Story for Night Number Three tells the tale of a boy whose birthday is on night three of Chanukah and is determined to make it special by making the largest latke in the world. The moral framework of ‘sharing’ lies behind the story, which is a good distraction from the increasingly materialistic nature of the festival. It is full of humour and hilarious illustrations (particularly the one of cleaning the kitchen). Lots of Latkes by Sandy Lanton is the story of when the preparations for a Chanukah party go wrong, and each guest brings the same food to the party. The story is a sweet tale, but presupposes knowledge about the festival. Engineer Ari and the Hanukah Mishap is part of a series of adventures of Ari and the Jewish festivals, but can be read as a stand-alone story. Ari is travelling home for Chanukah, gathering what he needs on the way and meeting a host of people who inform him about the story and traditions behind the festival. He’s delayed by a camel on the line at Modi’in though, and invited in by a local Bedouin, with whom he celebrates the first night of Chanukah. It aims to show that miracles, such as that which happened in 165 BC, still happen and that sharing the festival is a good way of celebrating it.

Dinosaurs Hanukah
Those of you who like the series of How Do Dinosaur books by Jane Yolen, illustrated by Mark Teague, will be delighted to learn there is even a Chanukah version – How Do Dinosaurs Say Happy Chanukah?, including such gems as:
“Does he fidget and fuss through the candlelight prayer?
Does he blow out the candles when no one is there?”
Perhaps a touch contrived, but actually the familiar format is a winner for me.

National Geographic Hanukkah
Lastly, National Geographic have a series of books that aim to show how different holidays from different religions are celebrated round the world, without going too far into the religious aspects. Celebrate Hanukkah: with Light, Latkes and Dreidels (Holidays around the World) by Deborah Heiligman highlights the main components of the festival, including the story, the food, the games and the lights, but what sets it apart is the beautiful photos of people celebrating the festival around the world. Good for Jewish people who already understand the festival as well as newcomers who are learning what Chanukah is for the first time.

A note of warning: if you’re searching online for books on the festival, you will find that the festival is spelled many ways in English, so one search may not bring up every book.

How Can I Help My Dyslexic Child To Love Reading?

Dyslexia Action quotes that on average one in three children in every classroom is dyslexic and therefore struggle in some way with literacy.[i] As a reading for pleasure consultant, it’s vital to help parents find those texts that will appeal to a dyslexic child, and keep them reading because they want to. In particular, it’s important not to make that child feel as if they can read only ‘easy’ books that their peers read long ago, and for which they might be ridiculed for reading.

Being dyslexic only means that the processing channels can get mixed up – it doesn’t mean the child is in any way less intelligent, and so the books still need to be content appropriate. It’s also vital that the child doesn’t find the processing too difficult, so that their confidence (which can be the first thing to go) is nurtured, and it’s vital to help them discover that reading can be a pleasure not a struggle.

Luckily, in today’s publishing industry, the publisher Barrington Stoke is doing some excellent work producing books that are dyslexia-friendly, and seek to be like any other chapter books in their outward appearance.

What does dyslexia-friendly mean? In the main, it means that books have the following features:
paper that’s off-white to reduce glare, well-spaced text, thick paper so that the words from the next or previous page do not show through, wide margins, straightforward syntax, (which means that there aren’t too many clauses in one sentence), an unjustified right-hand margin, a well-structured story, and signposts that clearly show the story’s natural pauses – pictures, headings etc.

I’m most often approached by parents of children aged about seven who are learning about dyslexia for the first time and are desperate to find appropriate books to encourage them to read and learn to love reading. Here are some titles by phenomenal children’s writers to help:
Haunting of Uncle Ronyoung werewolfsnake who came to stayreal true friendsmeet the weirds
The Haunting of Uncle Ron by Anne Fine
A funny book about a guest who doesn’t want to leave! Part of the 4u2read series from Barrington Stoke, which also includes excellent stories by the likes of Annie Dalton, Michael Morpurgo, Jeremy Strong, Malorie Blackman, and Terry Deary, all aimed at an 8-12 years interest age.

Young Werewolf by Cornelia Funke
One of my favourite authors ever since reading Inkheart, Cornelia has the ability to create magic through simple text. When Matt gets bitten on the way home from the cinema, he realises he’s been infected by a werewolf. Can he undo the curse before the full moon? See also The Moonshine Dragon by Cornelia Funke for younger readers.

The Snake Who Came to Stay by Julia Donaldson
Another excellent children’s author best known for her picture books (many are surprised that Julia Donaldson has so many titles for older readers, but she does!), this is a simple tale of a home for pets and the trouble that ensues when Doris the snake comes to stay. Part of the Little Gems series, this is aimed at the 5-8 years age group, which is quite a wide range in my opinion, but excellent for confidence building for first readers.

Real True Friends by Jean Ure
When Hannah moves to a new school she needs to discover who are her real friends. A good story about fitting in and friendships. Jean Ure is a well-established writer and many of her books feature girls aged between 10-14 years, so a young reader can progress through her books if she likes the style. I personally remember Jean Ure for her now out-of-print titles such as One Green Leaf and A Twist in Time, and Hi there, Supermouse! which I adored!

Meet the Weirds by Kaye Umansky
A fabulously funny story about unconventional neighbours. Mrs Weird is a stuntwoman and Mr Weird a mad scientist and they have some unconventional habits, so moving in next door to the Primms is bound to spell trouble.

There are many more titles on the Barrington Stoke website, to which I highly recommend a visit.

However, I would also point to stories such as the Horrid Henry series by Francesca Simon as a good read for dyslexic readers because they contain brilliant illustrations by Tony Ross, and are divided into short manageable chapters. Likewise Clarice Bean Don’t Look Now by Lauren Child and the Ottoline books by Chris Riddell are all stories broken up into short chunks with fantastic illustrations to accompany the text. Mr Gum by Andy Stanton has excellent spacing too, and try the Agatha Parrot books by Kjartan Poskitt, which, like the Mr Gum series, are also illustrated by the amazing David Tazzyman.

I would recommend the Edge series of graphic novels from the publisher Franklin Watts, which are also published on dyslexic-friendly paper. They are an excellent publisher of non-fiction titles, and their Slipstream series of reading resources is aimed at struggling readers.

For older readers (young teen) the Wired Up series by the publisher A&C Black are an invaluable source of gripping reads at manageable lengths and levels.

Of course it’s hugely helpful for a child to be able to identify with the characters they are reading about. So, here below are some books in which the protagonist has dyslexia:

percy jacksonhank zipzerreading the gamemaggot moon
Percy Jackson
Percy Jackson and The Lightning Thief is the first of a hugely popular series of adventures by Rick Riordan. This series focuses on adventures with the Greek gods, and the books are tremendously exciting and fast-paced. Aged 9 and up.(and there’s a film).
Hank Zipzer
The Hank Zipzer series of books by Henry Winkler (yes the Fonz to you) follows the haphazard adventures of a ten year old boy. Very American but also very funny.
Reading the Game by Tom Palmer
A lovely story about a football mad boy who is great at football but struggles to read. Part of the Football Academy series. Tom Palmer is also published by Barrington Stoke.
Maggot Moon by Sally Gardner
A teen novel that won the 2012 Costa Children’s Book Award, about a young teenage boy called Standish Treadwell, set in a totalitarian future state. Totally brilliant for its menacing subject matter, startling prose and exceptional characters:
“There are train-track thinkers, then there’s you, Standish, a breeze in the park of imagination.”
I also want to champion Sally Gardner here, who herself is dyslexic and has spoken out about this many times. She has written much for younger readers, including the Magical Children series, and gives splendid advice such as not shying away from giving dyslexic children a different platform from which to read. Giving a dyslexic child an ereader or a tablet for reading can help build confidence as it masks what they are actually reading – and therefore reduces any peer pressure. Some readers also find the letters jump around less on the ereader, and of course you can play with the font size. You can also try an audio book alongside the printed word for more challenging titles. And never, never underestimate the joy of reading aloud to your child (whatever age) to encourage their love for reading.

[i] Dyslexia Action (2012) Dyslexia still matters.

Chris Haughton Designs the 2015 International Book Giving Day Poster

IBGDposterLARGE

Today Chris Haughton is revealed as the illustrator behind the 2015 International Book Giving Day poster, and I’m pleased to be able to post it here.

Book Giving Day is on 14th February 2015 and aims to spread the love of reading by getting books into the hands of as many children as possible on that day. This is clearly a day close to my heart, as my main aim is to promote children’s love of reading and to encourage them to become lifelong book addicts.

The other reason Book Giving Day is close to my heart is that it is a 100 per cent volunteer initiative day. As a volunteer primary school librarian and someone who’s spent many hours on a volunteer basis campaigning for children’s playgrounds/road crossings/libraries etc, it’s great to see other people give up their time so willingly to help others.

The idea is to gift a book to a friend, leave a book in a waiting room for a child to read, or donate a gently used book to a local children’s library, hospital or shelter, or to a non-profit organisation that distributes books to children in need internationally.

There are numerous schools round the country which don’t have libraries, or don’t have libraries with enough books for the children. From my own experience, building a library from scratch for a school can be difficult, even with a supportive PTA and a good community. In more deprived areas, it can be much more difficult. The London Evening Standard on Tuesday highlighted the case of Kensington Aldridge Academy, in a socially deprived area, where they have the rooms for libraries but a complete lack of books to fill the shelves. In November, Russell Brand announced that he would give money to set up a library in his former school in Grays, Essex, where the library had been closed. Unfortunately, not all schools have celebrity alumni, so International Book Giving Day is a great opportunity to get involved.

A big thank you to Chris Haughton for designing the poster. Chris Haughton has been an illustrator for more than 12 years. His latest picture book, Shh! We Have a Plan won various awards, and his latest success is the wonderful app Hat Monkey. Try it – I love giving Hat Monkey a banana to eat! He’s also written Oh No, George!, and A Bit Lost, the latter for which I have a soft spot because of the owl!
A Bit Lost

www.bookgivingday.com

 

Picture Books Aren’t Just for Preschoolers

With the wealth of picture books in today’s children’s book market, it will come as no surprise to find that they are not all targeted at pre-schoolers. Reading the rich, beautiful vocabulary in some of them, imbibing the intensity of the emotions in others, and gaining moral insight in others, demonstrate that certain picture books are destined for audiences older than the 0-5 years marketplace. Many parents seem to think that once their child can read, they should progress swiftly to chapter books. Nothing could be further from the truth. I actively persuade my older children to look at picture books for inspiration for good writing, creative ideas and simple explanations of complex ideas.

The Snatchabooksnatchabook

One recent example, The Snatchabook by Helen Docherty and Thomas Docherty, published by Scholastic, is enjoyed much more by my grown self, and my seven year old avid reader, than by the toddlers in the vicinity! The language lends itself to an older audience, and the message itself – that stealing is wrong, but that one can put wrong a right and become accepted for admitting your crimes – is for the older audience. Language such as “making amends”, vocabulary such as ‘rumours spread’, and ‘solve the mystery’ give clues that the book demands to be looked at by the older reader.

I hate schoolHonor Brown

Sometimes the ‘joke’ inside the book and the punchline at the end, also lead to the understanding that the book is intended for a much older child. I Hate School by Jeanne Willis, illustrated by Tony Ross, and published by Andersen Press, is intended for a school child with some sophistication. A lovely rhyme about a child who explains to an adult how much she hates school (with some vivid imagery…”They beat us till we bleed”) until the punchline when it’s revealed that actually the child cried on leaving:
“Yes, Honor Brown just hated school
For years and years and years,
Yet on the day that she could leave,
I found her full of tears.”
Even Year 11s leaving school would relate to this one I think.

kicking a ballWhat does daddy do

Two books that I bought for my husband are Kicking a Ball by Allan Ahlberg, illustrated by Sebastien Braun and published by Puffin books and What Does Daddy Do? by Rachel Bright, also published by Puffin. In the first, by Allan Ahlberg, it’s not even the words that transfixed me so much, as the pictures, which have the capability to produce empathetic emotions only in those who have parented. Not only that, he makes a pun on the word ‘scoring’, using it in both senses of the word, which, thankfully, goes over the head of all three of my children at present:
“Kissing my wife, bathing our baby
Kicking a ball and SCORING (maybe).”
But in essence, it’s a book about the love of kicking a ball (anywhere, anyhow) and it works for any football mad boy to man in the world.

Kicking a ball2

What Does Daddy Do? by Rachel Bright, published by Puffin, is slightly more personal, because a member of my family does a job in the financial sector that for years was impossible for me or anyone related to him to describe! The title alone was enough to get us all chuckling, but even the text itself lends itself to a more grown up humour (even though it works perfectly well for four year olds too):
daddy superhero

““And he is a superhero!”
“Like Superman? gasped Bob.
“Yes!” said Daisy, “because he has to rescue people from a big bored room”
The illustrations in this one also come alive right off the page. It’s a smashing little find.

Lastly, revisit some Julia Donaldson picture books to fully appreciate the rich vocabulary she uses. The Snail and the Whale, published by Macmillan, is a good study for anyone wishing to hone their creative writing:
“These are the waves that arched and crashed
That foamed and frolicked and sprayed and splashed”
Sometimes the most complex ideas and feelings are best explored through picture books. Michael Rosen’s Sad Book, Shaun Tan’s The Arrival and The Promise by Nicola Davies are outstanding examples of this, and all for different reasons and on different themes – but more on them another time!

The Dark All Around Us

Many small children have a fear of the dark. This can be difficult to address because the dark is an abstract idea; the fear is of the unknown, which makes it hard to conjure in a picture book. However, I have found five books that I think do the job really well in different ways. I’ve listed them in a kind of youngest to oldest order (lots of quibble room here though).

can't you sleep little bear

Can’t you Sleep Little Bear by Martin Waddell, illustrated by Barbara Firth

Although not immediately apparent that this about a fear of the dark, Can’t you Sleep Little Bear displays a perfect juxtaposition of darkness and light. The book kicks off with a light-drenched illustration as the bears play in the snow in bright sunlight, but then soon retreat home for bed to the Bear Cave as the sun goes down. Immediately the illustrations move to the ‘dark’ part of the cave where Little Bear is trying (and failing) to sleep. During the course of the book, Big Bear fetches larger and larger lanterns for Little Bear in the hope of trying to disperse the “dark all around us”. There’s no magic resolution to the story, as it becomes apparent that tiredness overcomes the fear in the end, but it does try to illustrate that there is no real dark, as even outside in the dark, the moon and stars overcome it, and Little Bear ends up “warm and safe in Big Bear’s arms”. There is nothing remotely frightening in this book, no hidden shadows or shapes in the ‘darkness’, just a comforting glow of the adult space. In this way, it can comfort the smallest of children. (There’s even a touch of humour added for the impatient grown up reader).

can't you sleep little bear2

 

There’s a Dragon Downstairs by Hilary McKay, illustrated by Amanda Harvey
This book won various awards about a decade ago and tackles the darkness in a solid way by illuminating the dark’s distortion of everyday things into monstrous entities; the darkness makes the familiar appear fearsome. Even the pencil lines of the illustrations indicate the ephemeral shadiness of the darkness. There is much sympathy for our protagonist Sophie from her parents, who valiantly search the house for the dragon, although in the end it is Sophie who must fight her own demons! Of course, the end is beautifully reassuring (spoiler alert!) – the dragon is revealed to be none other than the friendly domestic cat. A great way to explore a child’s fear without stating the obvious.

 there's a dragon downstairs

The Owl who was Afraid of the Dark by Jill Tomlinson, illustrated by Paul Howard
A beautiful picture book, which I read as a child as a chapter book – today it is published in both formats. The owl parents in this instance are ‘laissez-faire’ parents, sending the child owl ‘Plop’ to do some research on why it’s good to be a night owl! Plop interviews various humans (and a cat) about the dark to find out why they like it. Each character supplies Plop with a new adjective about the dark:
“The small boy said DARK IS EXCITING. The old lady said DARK IS KIND. The little girl said DARK IS NECESSARY. The man with the telescope said DARK IS WONDERFUL.”
Jill Tomlinson manages to convey Plop’s stubborn childlike qualities in his language;
“I still do not like it AT ALL”,
although he is persuaded in the end. The picture book, illustrated by Paul Howard, conveys the excitement of the fireworks and the magical quality of the night stars, as well providing the most exquisite owl drawings. A book that confronts the fear head on! I never tire of it.

owl who was afraid3owl who was afraid1

 

The Dark by Lemony Snicket, illustrated by Jon Klassen

A more recent picture book that confronts the fear head on is The Dark. The pictures as much as the text in this book simulate the fear of the little boy Laszlo, who is seen only in rays of light, while the rest of the page stays in the dark. The dark is even personified here, given a voice halfway through the book, which itself is pretty frightening:
“The voice of the dark was as creaky as the roof of the house, and as smooth and cold as the windows, and even though the dark was right next to Laszlo, the voice seemed very far away.”
I’ve suggested this is for slightly older readers because although immensely powerful, during most of the book the illustrations are fairly threatening. Laszlo is a brave hero and ventures further and further into the dark, until the dark is finally explained by Snicket, in fact – explained in the same way as the little girl in The Owl Who Was Afraid of the Dark – as being necessary! The darkness is also generous in The Dark, giving Laszlo a lightbulb to explain how without the dark:
“you would never know if you needed a lightbulb”.
A tricky concept, adeptly handled.

Dark Lemony Snicket

Little Mouse’s Big Book of Fears by Emily Gravett
This is not strictly about the dark, although there is a page about being alone or in the dark, but Emily Gravett’s book uses a different tool from the other books to conquer fears, which is perhaps worth mentioning here: art. Big Book of Fears sets out lots of things that may be frightening, from common childhood fears of dogs and getting lost, to fears that are slightly more obscure, such as fear of clocks, but each time the illustrator implores you to overcome your fears through use of art. Not such a bad idea, when for children, expressing emotions through pictures can be an illuminating task. The other undercurrent here for confronting and defeating fear is humour. The scared mouse taking us through the pages, delights parent and child alike as it recoils from ‘knives’ in a page that features newspaper cuttings on the ‘three blind mice and the farmer’s wife’. There are some excellent pull-outs here too – the page on heights features an exciting map of the Isle of Fright. A great book for starting a conversation about what’s scary and how fears can be confronted and conquered.

Little Mouse book of fears

Why Does My Child Persist in Only Reading Series of Books?

Naughtiest girl series
Any marketing man’s dream, many children, particularly aged between six and 10, love to read books in series. Harry Potter, Famous Five, Rainbow Fairy, Beast Quest, Astrosaurs, Horrid Henry. The question is why, and does it matter, and what are the series doing? The ones mentioned above actually do very different things.

There are some key factors to the appeal of series books for this age group. The first is stability and familiarity. Once a child empathises with a character such as Horrid Henry, and finds them funny or interesting, they want to hear about as many adventures with that character as possible. If the setting is magical and yet comforting, such as Hogwarts, the child may wish to revisit it as much as possible. Even the setting in a series such as Famous Five allows for escapism into a time and place that’s very different from the child’s own. In terms of the Rainbow Fairy series, some children latch onto the series because they want to read the story of the fairy with their own name, and then their sister’s, cousin’s, etc. There’s also, for some, the impetus to read the whole series just because they know there are twelve titles for example, or to be in competition with their friends.

Many times I have had children ask me ‘but why did the author end it there?’ when they come to the end of a favourite book. So there is great satisfaction to be derived knowing that there is a follow-on title. Children aren’t alone in this – many adults will read as many books by the same author as possible – knowing that there is a familiarity in tone, style and sometimes even character and plot devices.

Sometimes though parents can find this worrying. I have many parents moan that their child ‘will only read Horrid Henry’, or ‘I can’t get them to read anything else but Beast Quest’, and some of these series go on and on…

It can be worrying in that with some of these books the plots and characters do not develop, eg. Rainbow Fairies, but simply shift shape slightly and there is no growth in vocabulary. Others can provide a growth – as we know in Harry Potter the characters grow older with each book, and the adventures get darker. Either way, with a series of books, two things matter here. One, that the child is reading something – and enjoying it. And secondly, to remember that the child will move on in their own time. One day they will simply get bored and pick up the next thing. What’s most important is that they are enjoying reading. From personal experience I read ALL the Famous Five books, and yet still graduated to reading George Eliot, Ian McEwan, and many many more!

For those series that don’t follow a chronological or sequential order, but just keep churning out more adventures, there can still be much to gain from. Many children adore the Horrid Henry books, starting with the Early Readers and moving onto the more advanced series. What stands out for me with Horrid Henry is that they are not unlike some of the very early readers, such as Topsy and Tim, which introduce first experiences. Horrid Henry just does this at a later stage, introducing many first school experiences for children – Horrid Henry’s Nits, Horrid Henry Tricks the Tooth Fairy,  Horrid Henry’s Sports Day (the list goes on!). It can be comforting for children starting to read independently to read about a familiar character with similar problems to their own, and of course, a character who makes them laugh.

Horrid Henry series

Other series do work in a chronological or sequential order and can be frustrating for both parents and children when the numbers aren’t printed on the spines! (Publishers take heed!). An excellent website to help you is www.childrensbooksequels.co.uk
an invaluable resource if your child is unsure which Dork Diary precedes which! One of my daughters is so enamoured with the Judy Moody series that instead of waiting for the next in the series (due out January 2015, Judy Moody, Mood Martian), she’s writing her own!

Judy Moody series

A last word of advice – if your child is obsessed with reading these kinds of series, Astrosaurs, Beast Quests etc, try to choose a completely different book to read to them. That way, you’re making sure that they can continue reading what they love, but you’re introducing different styles, formats, characters, and plots.