mermaids

The Ice Sea Pirates: A Sneak Peak at Illustrations

I’m delighted to showcase The Ice Sea Pirates by Frida Nilsson, illustrated by David Barrow, on the blog today. Nilsson’s latest book, The Ice Sea Pirates, is a classic children’s adventure story about a girl called Siri who dares to trek the ice seas and face down fearsome leader of pirates Captain Whitehead, in order to rescue her sister. This is a survival story set in a wild landscape of our dreams and nightmares – seas that freeze over with extreme cold and lash ships to pieces with their ice shards – a troop of pirates who capture children to work down a mine – ferocious wolves who wander the ice looking for prey.

But above all, this is a hugely compelling read with a sympathetic, staggeringly brave and wholesome main character, and a gripping narrative. It’s no wonder the book has been nominated for five Swedish book awards, and won three of them. Now, available in English, translated by Peter Graves, and softly and warmly illustrated by David Barrow, this is really a sumptuous read.

Nilsson draws clever parallels between wolf cubs and children, explores boundaries of nature and nurture and protection of the young. She also shows the ability of children to see the larger picture, as well as delving into themes of family loyalty, and the wonder of mythical sea creatures. This is a daring and intelligent tale, sprinkled with humour. More than anything though, it is the imaginary harsh Arctic landscape of small islands dotted in the freezing sea that dominates, and creates an adventure that’s both beautiful and challenging. Frida Nilsson explains the role of nature in the novel:

“The scenery is very important I think, in order to convince the reader that I am “telling the truth”. That doesn’t mean that the description of the scenery most be very long. In fact, I heard a Swedish writer say once: the longer and more thorough the scenery is, the surer you can be that the writer was never there for real. To describe the scenery in a short and vigorous manner is not easy.

The Ice Sea Pirates is a fictional world with, of course, strong impressions from the Arctic. I went to Tromsö (northern Norway) with my mother once. She worked at the hospital there and I had the days all to myself to wander about and go to the local museum, where they had exhibitions about whale- and walrus-hunting. A lot of my ideas for the book come from that trip.

My home town of Mörkö, Sweden, wasn’t a direct influence for this book, but the beautiful scenery is an inspiration for me and my writing.”

Frida’s text is complemented by the softly drawn, mesmeric images from illustrator David Barrow. Below is a selection of the images, which Gecko Press have been kind enough to let me share.




You can buy The Ice Sea Pirates here.

Tamsin and the Deep by Neill Cameron and Kate Brown

Tamsin and the Deep

This is a first for this blog – a review of a comic book. Last year I came across The Phoenix, a weekly children’s comic that’s growing in popularity, and on Feb 4th they are publishing one of their strips as an entire book.

Tamsin and the Deep borrows from folklore and myth, with echoes of The Little Mermaid, as it tells the story of Tamsin, and the legend stalking her family.

While surfing at the beach, Tamsin wipes out and goes missing for a month. She can’t remember what transpired in the weeks she went missing, but before long other strange things start happening to her – from the appearance of a magic stick to a talking bird. Then, she realises that her brother is in terrible danger, and she must break the mermaid’s ancient covenant to save him.

This is a dense storyline, with compelling plot and imaginative vocabulary. The comic book style lends much immediacy to the story – at times enabling several simultaneous events to be unfolded on the same page. It hones terrific inference skills as the reader gathers much of what’s happening from the pictures rather than the text.

But this is no standard comic, no standard story. The characters are rounded, and richly developed. The dialogue between the siblings and their friends is realistic, engaging and witty. There’s a beautiful sibling relationship, but underwritten with the impatience and frustration that accompanies familial dynamics.

The darkness of the legend, and the story within a story give this comic a real potency – it’s both adventure story and fantasy, containing both humour and dark undertones.

The illustrations too are a cut above – the initial drawings of wet-suits at the surf lend this a space age feel, but then it seems to borrow from manga too in its depiction of our feisty heroine. The legend is told almost in sepia, and looks fantastical and romantic – different styles highlighting the illustrator’s wealth of talent.

In a blogpost, Neill outlined the trickiness of writing a comic – it’s not just about the text of course, but a directive and collaboration with the illustrator, almost as in a film script – to work out from which point of view the drawing is in each box, to depict not just the action but the expression on the face, whether there’s a close up or background. This is an intriguing and completely different way of writing from prose, and it draws out attention to detail, each emotion, and each development.

This was a delight to read – darkness, humour, and a great story. A great many books fall through my letter box weekly and not all are snatched away by the children who live here – but to review this one I had to wrestle it from their hands. If that’s not proof enough, then what is? Suitable for all readers, 8+ years.

Publishes 4th Feb 2016. You can pre-order or buy it here.