middle grade (age 8-13yrs)

Another Revamp Hits the Shelves: Alex Rider

1Stormbreaker2Point Blanc3Skeleton Key

Yeah yeah, I thought. I know why the kids like it: boys’ toys and gadgets, action scenes, mystery, slick dialogue, bam bam. Dismissing them out of hand in the same way I dismiss grown men’s love for 007, gladiator movies, Bourne identities, etc. Then my son went to hear Anthony Horowitz talk at the Southbank centre and came back inspired, and Walker Books contacted me about their relaunch for the brand, and I thought okay it’s time I read Alex Rider myself.
Wow! Tightly plotted, niftily written, the first book in the series, Stormbreaker, zooms along like a rocket to its target. I felt compelled from the first sentence. It’s as exciting and unrealistic as you could ask for in this genre. I loved our hero, and how clever and skilful and cool he is. I loved the machinations of the ‘MI6’ set up and the elusive villains. It made me smile, and admire Horowitz’s skilful storytelling. For someone usually disdainful of such spy thrillers, this one was more than a pleasure from start to finish. In this first adventure, Alex Rider is employed by MI6 precisely because he is a schoolboy, and can infiltrate the headquarters of Sayle Enterprises as the winner of a computer magazine competition to discover if there’s anything suspect about the line of computers, the Stormbreakers, which Sayle Enterprises are rolling out free to every school in the country. Of course, there is something highly suspect about Mr Sayle, not least his penchant for keeping a Portuguese Man ‘o War as his pet, and Alex Rider has to stop his deathly plan before it’s too late.

4Eagle Strike5Scorpia6Ark Angel

What’s so pleasing is that the Alex Rider books are exactly what they say on the tin! From the corny filmic staplines on the back cover…”His first assignment may well be his last” to the spy gadgets bestowed upon Alex (the zit cream that melts metal), to the chapter headings, “Double O Nothing” and the exhilarating non-stop action – these are all the right ingredients for this genre of pacey thriller. But it’s the flawless perfection that Anthony Horowitz brings to the genre with his taut writing style and seemingly effortless imagination that make this a powerful and exemplary series. I fully intend to now read the rest.

One keen fan has helped me out this week with my blog – here are his comments. His name is Samuel and he’s 10 years old:

Alex Rider is a good series, which I really like because it is fun and exciting. It follows an orphaned teenage spy, recruited by MI6. Alex was brought up by his Uncle Ian and his housekeeper, Jack Starbright. Jack kept on living with him after Uncle Ian’s death. Alex later discovers that his parents and his uncle were all secretly spies and were all assassinated.
One of my favourite books in the series is “Eagle Strike”. Alex is certain that Damian Cray, pop singer has got an evil plan after finding his phone number on an assassin’s mobile. MI6 don’t believe him and Alex sets out on his own to investigate. He travels to Holland to find Cray’s game console factory and finds out what ‘Eagle Strike’; Cray’s plot; is all about. I like it because it is exciting and there are lots of unexpected turns in the story. My favourite part is when Alex finds himself inside a deadly video game… in real life!
What I like most in this series are the gadgets. They are fun and exciting to have. The gadget maker Smithers is a bald, fat, friendly man who is my favourite character. My favourite gadget is a calculator which can be used to contact MI6 and can also jam CCTV cameras. Gadgets play a big part in the books because they add excitement and help make them interesting and full of suspense.
I love the Alex Rider series and hope to finish reading them all.

 

7Snakehead8Crocodile Tears9Scorpia Rising

For those of you who are yet to discover Alex Rider, luckily for you the whole series has been rebranded with covers designed by a video game designer, Two Dots, the studio who designed the packaging for Ubisoft’s video games Assassins Creed and Far Cry, and they suit the stories well. Clever spines highlight the number in the series, as well as spelling out Alex Rider when they are lined up on the shelf. To buy Stormbreaker, click here.

There is also a new Alex Rider website, www.alexrider.com and you can even go on ‘spy training’ camp with the Youth Hostels Association.

Thank you to Walker books for a review copy of Eagle Strike

10Russian Roulette

An Interview with Tatum Flynn, author of The D’Evil Diaries

The Devil Diaries TatumFlynn (2)

Tatum Flynn is darn witty on twitter. I always feel that twitter users should be witty – the word wit is in the name – but Tatum and her avatar stand out in particular. And then I noticed that she’d written a book for children too – with a deeply compelling title, The D’Evil Diaries, and I knew I had to read it. The book has an intriguing premise – it is set in Hell, features the Devil himself, which is fairly subversive for a children’s book aimed at the 9 yrs+ audience, and even contains conversations between the Devil and God. I realised this was one debut children’s author whom I had to interview. I first asked Tatum if she had set out to do something different by writing her rather rebellious yet highly inventive novel.
I’m not sure if​ any writer sets out to write something different on purpose, we just all *are* different, we all have uniquely odd internal universes. Writers just let the cat out of the bag by putting those internal universes onto the page. I simply set out to write a story that would entertain me, with an eye to eleven-year-old me, and that story happened to be a funny version of Hell because that type of subversion and unlikely juxtaposition is the kind of thing that tickles me.
In the novel there are two very likeable and well depicted children – Jinx, the son of the Devil, and Tommy, a dead child who seems to be in Hell by mistake. Is Tatum more of a Jinx or a Tommy?
All my characters have a bit of me in them – I think they have to, to come alive – but honestly the character that I most identify with is Loiter. [Jinx’s pet sloth] I would happily spend most of my days lounging in a hammock drinking margaritas and reading Calvin and Hobbes. But if I had to choose between Jinx and Tommy, I’d say I was more like Tommy as a kid – I didn’t have her talents for gymnastics or knife-throwing, but I was pretty bouncy and chatty and a crackshot with a pistol.”
Devil Diary illustration2
Pistols aside, there’s some wacky stuff in the book, with superb action scenes from a carousel where evil horses come to life, to woods with dead witches hanging from trees. Above all, there is oodles of humour, and not just common slapstick, but witty intellectual humour, which is so refreshing and wonderful to read in a children’s book:
Humour doesn’t necessarily come naturally to me. Sometimes it does, but sometimes I go back and say, Hmm, this chapter isn’t funny enough, let’s have someone fall on a hellhound and squish them. But that’s the joy of writing – it’s easier to be funny when you have time to think about it! Esprit d’escalier and all that. Humour generally, though, is super important to me. Laughter is the physical manifestation of joy, there should be more of it around. It’s one of the reasons I write kid’s books, because there’s far more humour in them than adult books. Humour is also a great way to take pretention down a peg or two, or mock terrible things happening in the world. I think humour keeps the human race sane, and that’s not an exaggeration.”
Tatum’s book is funny, but also controversial, as Tatum features God as a character in The D’evil Diaries. I wanted to know if she’d hesitated before including Him, as I imagine there may have been consternation among some publishers:
Yes, a little, though probably not for the reasons you might think – I mean, once you set a kid’​s book in Hell you’ve already pushed all your chips in the middle.”
Tatum’s chips reference brings her past as a professional poker player into play. Maybe this helped her look at things from different points of view in the book as well. It is written in first person, from Jinx’s point of view, but Tatum also has scenes between God and Lucifer.
I was unsure about having too many different points of view.​ The first section from His point of view was something I wrote early on, but I took it out. Then I was encouraged by various people to enlarge the Lucifer sections and interstitials, so I put it back in. One of my favourite lines in the book is ‘God was in his pyjamas’, so I’m glad He crept back in, plus I’m fond of the dynamic between Him and Lucifer, where the King of Hell reverts to being a sulky teenager around his Father.”
Devil Diary illustration
I stopped short of asking Tatum about her religion but did venture to query her opinion on the existence of Heaven and Hell:
The epigraph at the beginning of my sequel is:
‘The mind is its own place, and in itself can make a heaven of hell, a hell of heaven.’​
​from Paradise Lost​. That’s the type of heaven and hell I absolutely think exists. I’ll leave the possible existence of other types to the theologians.”
Something that particularly tickled me in the book was Tatum’s imaginative use of chapter titles from chapter 10 ‘Blah Blah Secret Plots Blah Blah’ to chapter 11 ‘Library Cards at Dawn’ but also her references to songs, chapter 14 ‘If You Go Down to the Woods Today’ to chapter 23 ‘Just Another Brick in the Wall’. Which song would Tatum prefer of the two?
Woods, definitely, I always think there’s something slightly deliciously creepy about the teddy bears’ picnic…
Lastly, I asked Tatum which book in the world she wished she had written. Jokingly, she replied…”the new one I’ve just started,” but then proceeded to tell me her favourite influences:
Molesworth, the Addams Family, Tankgirl, Calvin and Hobbes – but I couldn’t have written (or drawn, interesting how they’re all illustrated) those anyway. I’m just glad that they’re out in the world for me to be inspired by. I think most people become writers because the book they want to read doesn’t exist, at least that was partly ​the case with me. So I think the book I wish I had written is one of my own that’s yet to come, one that will be as near to perfect as I can clumsily make it.”
Self-deprecating, witty and clearly talented, I’m delighted to have interviewed Tatum Flynn about her debut children’s book. I’m sure I’ll be talking to her in years to come about how much more she’s achieved.

You can purchase The D’Evil Diaries here and find out more about Tatum Flynn here, including her vagabond past of piloting lifeboats in Venezuela, shooting rapids in the Grand Canyon and almost falling out of a plane over Scotland.

 

 

The D’Evil Diaries by Tatum Flynn

The Devil Diaries

Once in a while a children’s book comes along that is so inventive, and witty, and different, that you want to hug it whilst reading. Twelve year old protagonist Jinx D’evil is just like any other school boy apart from the fact that he is a demon with bright red skin and wings, lives in Hell and is the son of the ruler there, Lucifer. His problem is that he is too angelic – he is no good at being devilish, and runs away from his father after disappointing him one too many times. Whilst on the run, in the outer circles of Hell he meets Tommy, a dead girl, and together they discover a coup to overthrow his father, and finally Jinx has a chance to prove himself a worthy devilish son. The ensuing adventure is fast, furious and fun. The story is gripping, the writing compelling and the jokes clever and witty, so that you can appreciate them as an adult and as a child – it’s not just silly slapstick:
“Now, now, you really needn’t worry. I happen to know that Tafrac, the Patron Demon of Wrath, isn’t home right now. I believe he’s down on Earth, busy making people angry with a new scheme, something to do with website comments.”
Even the chapter headings are well conceived, from ‘A Rare, Lesser-Spotted Dead Girl’ and ‘Blah Blah Secret Plots Blah Blah’ to ‘How Grim Was My Valley’. Throughout the book these chapters are interspersed with scenes of Lucifer himself – sometimes on holiday – sometimes chatting with God. Tatum Flynn’s writing oozes effortless humour, but she manages to deftly mix it with a great plot and loveable and realistic characters. The friendship between Jinx and Tommy is nicely observed and develops well during the novel. This is a great debut book from a new talent. I recommend it both for its irreverence and its crafty humour. There will be high expectations for the sequel.

Illustrations by Dave Shephard

Publishes 2nd April. You can buy the book here.

Thank you to Hachette publishers for sending me a proof copy of this title for review.

Waterstones Children’s Book Prize 2015

Blown Away
This evening, the Waterstones Children’s Book Prize was announced. Another book prize? I hear you moan. But actually book prizes can be really helpful in identifying book recommendations for your children, as most awards tend to be judged by experts in the field – those in the industry or children themselves! The shortlist for this year’s Waterstones prize was particularly strong – you can scroll down and see them at the end of this blogpost. The categories are split into three: illustrated book, fiction 5-12 years and teen. Then an overall book is chosen as the winner – and tonight it was Blown Away.

I did review Blown Away by Rob Biddulph in my Christmas penguin blogpost last year, but wanted to revisit it to explain why I think it’s a worthy winner. It tells the story of Penguin Blue, who flies his brand new kite, but gets swept away and taken on a journey far away from his native land. Those animals who try to rescue him are also taken along for the ride. The text rhymes, which makes it good to read aloud, but it’s the multitude of small detail that wins it for me. The animals from Antarctica are amazed when they stumble upon a jungle island, because, as Rob points out, green is not a colour they’ve seen before. The ending of the story also sits well: Rob explains that after his long journey away – this penguin isn’t made for flying. It’s a superbly neat ending for a penguin picture book.

There are great small details on each page – you’ll have to buy a copy to see the insides – but they include the seal’s washing (and the surprise post in his postbox), the numerous signposts, the numbered clouds in the sky, the name on the ice cream van, the texture on the sea – and even the endpapers. You can buy a copy here.

murder most unladylike

The book that won the 5-12 years fiction category was Murder Most Unladylike by Robin Stevens, described as an Enid Blyton/Agatha Christie mashup. It’s fabulous, and one I have recommended on a individual basis many times. I fully intend to blog on the appeal of this new series and Robin Steven’s fantastic writing and characterisation when I get a minute. You can buy a copy here.

Best Illustrated Book:
The Queen’s Hat by Steve Antony
The Dawn Chorus by Suzanne Barton
Blown Away by Rob Biddulph
Where Bear? by Sophy Henn
Atlas of Adventures by Lucy Letherland, words by Rachel Williams
The Sea Tiger by Victoria Turnbull

Best Fiction for 5-12s:
Girl with a White Dog by Anne Booth
Cowgirl by G R Gemin
Boy in the Tower by Polly Ho-Yen
Murder Most Unladylike by Robin Stevens
Violet and the Pearl of the Orient by Harriet Whitehorn, illustrated by Becka Moor
A Boy Called Hope by Lara Williamson

Me and My Books: The Grammar Conundrum

grammar
My books and myself? My books and I? Are you finding this difficult to read? And now I’ve started a sentence with ‘and’, which is okay in literary prose isn’t it? Although children are taught that you absolutely mustn’t start a sentence with ‘and’; it’s not deemed to be an acceptable sentence opener.

Seriously though, how much does it bother you? I read a LOT of books. Or a great many books! So many of them contain grammatical errors, particularly when I read them on the kindle, although admittedly many of the ebook errors are typos, which leaves me wondering if the digitisation was just a tad slapdash. Are we making more grammatical errors because our language is evolving and we deem it to be okay to finish a sentence with a preposition, split an infinitive, or use that instead of which, or are we just not taught grammar correctly anymore? Are there less copyeditors (yes, I know it’s fewer) with a good grammatical grounding?

The Super Adventures of Me Pig

Does it matter more if the grammar is correct in children’s books? Some children’s books are supposed to contain grammatical errors. The funniest book in our house at the moment is The Super Amazing Adventures of Me Pig by Emer Stamp. It starts like this:
“Hello.
Me I is Pig. I is 562 sunsets old. Well, I is guessing that is how old I is. I is not brilliant at counting. I got a bit confused around 487.”
The grammar here is not annoying because it’s supposed to be terrible – the author is writing as if he is a rather stupid pig, so the grammar reflects this, and it makes the book funny. The children testers for this book found it hilarious because they knew instinctively that it was grammatically very badly written. However, in order for them to find the style funny, they have to know the correct grammar to start with. But what about if the author is writing from a young child’s point of view, but in the third person narrative voice:
“He did, however, out of the corner of his eye, catch them doing that sarcastic thing they did, where one of them – Barry didn’t like separating TSE into two, as that was kind of recognising that they existed, but if he had to, he would refer to them as Sisterly Entities One and Two – would pretend to write down something he said, as if it was really important. Which of course was their way of saying that it wasn’t important at all. Barry really hated it when they did that.”
The Parent Agency, David Baddiel, illustrated by Jim Field

Heidi

What’s the difference between the book containing grammatical errors or just being badly written? Would a book flow better if the grammar was correct? Take an extract from Heidi by Johanna Spyri. Some might argue that the language is too ‘heavy’ and the style of writing too old-fashioned, and therefore it becomes prohibitive as a modern child needs something lighter. I don’t necessarily agree with that:
“Heidi looked at the jug that was steaming away invitingly, and ran quickly back to the cupboard. At first she could only see a small bowl left on the shelf, but she was not long in perplexity, for a moment later she caught sight of two glasses further back, and without an instant’s loss of time she returned with these and the bowl and put them down on the table.”

Narrative voice should also make a difference. If we can’t excuse David Baddiel for the writing above, would we be more willing to excuse it if he had written the book in the first person instead of the third person? The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is acceptable because it’s written in a colloquial way in the narrative first person.
“You don’t know about me without you have read a book by the name of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; but that ain’t no matter.”
However, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is as much about accent and social commentary as it is about grammar. Do we always need to be grammatically incorrect to talk in a child’s voice? The following books all use grammar incorrectly for effect – to create the child’s personality and they’re all in the first person. Are the grammar mistakes immediately apparent to the average child?

Emily Sparkes

“This is completely a bad start and I am just thinking I need to change the subject quick because she is on an ‘eco-roll’ when it is too late and she says the terrible words.”
Emily Sparkes and the Friendship Fiasco by Ruth Fitzgerald

Clarice Bean Spells Trouble

“I go home in a very downcast-ish mood and even my older brother Kurt says, “What’s the matter with you?”
Which is unusual because usually he doesn’t notice other people’s gloom, he is too busy feeling gloom himself.”
Clarice Bean Spells Trouble by Lauren Child
But then surely, if Clarice is quoting her mother, as she does in the next extract, would her mother, as the adult, speak slightly better than she does here:
“When I ask Mum why he’s so cheerful, she says, “He’s just got himself this weekend job at Eggplant and it has really put him in a good mood.” To me, this still sounds like Clarice Bean – or is Clarice not quoting her mother directly, but twisting it from her memory into ‘Clarice speak’. Is bad grammar excused if it’s in speech marks because it’s representative of how we speak, which is often grammatically different from written prose?

Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney is American, and so of course a reader should expect Americanisms, but the author also deploys a lack of good grammar for effect – it is a child’s diary after all.
“Us kids have pretty much figured Fregley out by now, but I don’t think the teachers have really caught on yet.”
However, if it’s being an ‘authentic’ kid’s diary – would the spelling all be correct, or should the editor be modifying that too to create ‘personality’? Tricky one, hey? What about apostrophes? They all seem to be correct in the Wimpy Kid books…should they not be? Do your children speak like this? Can readers/writers get inside the head of a youngster without resorting to bad grammar?

I have a child in my house who insists on saying “Me and my friend went swimming” instead of “My friend and I went swimming”. I correct her constantly, which must be ‘super irritating’! However, did she pick this up from reading, or from her other friends? One children’s book, which I read recently, made this one error all the way through, even though the rest of the book was grammatically correct. For effect or just an error? Has our language changed so much from the days of Johanna Spyri that it’s now acceptable for modern literature to have bad grammar littered throughout? Does the expanse of bad grammar in our midst mean that children’s authors have a responsibility to write with even more care for correct grammatical usage to teach our children what’s right in the first place? If our children pick up their language tools from reading, at what point do we think its okay to break the rules for effect? And one day will they even know the difference?

When does bad grammar become a literary style?

 

By the way, last Thursday I guest-blogged on another site, MG Strikes Back, about the role of animals in middle grade fiction. You can read it here. It mentions some of my recent favourite MG books too.

MG STrikes back

The Astounding Broccoli Boy by Frank Cottrell Boyce

Broccoli Boy

An amusing tale involving superheroes, food and school bullies. Rory Rooney is locked up as a medical mystery when he unexpectedly turns broccoli green on a school trip. The scientists aren’t sure if he’s carrying a contagious disease or if his colour is the result of something he ate. When Rory discovers another boy has also turned green, and not only that, but he’s the school bully and they’ve been locked up in isolation together, he realises they will have to work as a team to prove to the world that they are superheroes and must escape – after all, the Incredible Hulk and the Green Goblin were green. Cottrell Boyce manages to make ordinary London extraordinary as the hero and his classmate roam around a vibrant night-time London, having weird and wonderful adventures, their friendship developing and cementing the further into the book you delve. Brimming with humour and likeable characters, this was a gripping read from start to finish. Giggles a-plenty and great visual scenes that almost beg to be made into a movie. Add in some girl power, a penguin and a friendly prime minister and you have an immensely lovable story. Frank Cottrell Boyce has an easy-going natural storytelling voice that manages to weave humour, great adventure and pathos into a book all at the same time. Modern London is adroitly depicted in the book, with the climax reaching the dizzying heights of the Shard. Not to be missed by your children of eight years and over. Publishes 26th March 2015.

Illustrated by the incredibly talented Steven Lenton (unfortunately for me I reviewed this from a very early proof, so didn’t get to see the illustrations – that’s why I’m going to buy my own copy through the link below!)

To buy The Astounding Broccoli Boy, click here

Robot Girl by Malorie Blackman, illustrated by Matthew Griffin

Robot Girl

Of course, I have nothing but praise for Malorie Blackman. She’s the children’s laureate, and clearly a wonderful writer. She was also given a gold Blue Peter badge earlier this year in recognition for inspiring children. Her latest book for Barrington Stoke is for those with a reading age of eight, but interest level stretches to 12 years. Actually, I’d argue with the publishers here – the novel works as a brilliant short story for adults too! Claire’s Dad works long hours in his lab, perfecting a project he has been working on for a long time. Claire feels neglected and confides her feelings by email with her friend, Maisie, who seems to be the only one who understands her. However, when Claire’s Dad reveals the project, it’s only the first of many surprises to come Claire’s way. This is a fantastic futuristic little tale full of twists and surprises, with fabulous clues dropped in, and beautiful illustrations to accompany the text – all set out in a dyslexia-friendly way. It asks powerful questions about who we are, what life would be like without feelings, and what it means to be truly alive. I hesitate to describe it more for want of giving away the suspenseful punchline. Masterly crafted, this would work as good fodder for classroom discussion on storytelling and questions of philosophy in secondary schools too. Fabulous.

Click here to buy this book.

How To Fly With Broken Wings by Jane Elson

how to fly with broken wings

Author Jane Elson has worked with young offenders and children with special needs, and she brings some of her experiences into her latest novel, How to Fly With Broken Wings. Told from alternating points of view, first 12 year old Willem who has Aspergers Syndrome, and then Sasha, a girl mixed up with boys from the gangs on the estate where she lives. Their tales collide as they make friends in a desperate attempt to overcome the bullishness of the gangs around them, and to escape the riots on their London estate. The voices are deeply authentic, reminiscent of Christopher Boone in Mark Haddon’s The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time. Willem’s voice holds no prisoners, giving literal accounts of his thoughts and observations, from watching the looting of the sports shops during the riots when his attention shifts to the untouched library:
“I do not think the riot people wanted to read books.”
His unflinching honesty is touching to read and beautifully juxtaposed with the extreme emotions of Sasha, as the reader sees her relationship with her father, teachers and peers through her adolescent eyes. Jane Elson also manages to draw into the story the tale of war-flying spitfires, as a man arrives on the estate who tries to give the rioting youth a sense of purpose, history and pride. She cleverly weaves together the bullying of Willem as he is goaded to jump from a too-high wall: “If Finn Madison shouts jump you jump or you are dead” with Willem’s ambitions to fly, and involves Sasha with the history of the women who flew the spitfires. It’s a fascinating and refreshing contemporary story, which will certainly teach many of its target readership what life is like for other children. It also works beautifully to bridge any gender divide in book sales and readership – hence my book of the week this week.
For age 10+

With thanks to Hodder Children’s Books for the review copy.

Every Day For Me is World Book Day

I wrote about focusing on the book, not the costume for World Book Day here. But I don’t want to appear negative, for I adore World Book Day. It’s a day to celebrate writers, writing and favourite characters. The bus stop was quite a sight this morning with unicorns, Horrid Henrys, monkeys, including my own adorable Muggle Wump, some crocodiles, and I even spotted Where’s Wally. Kudos to me! Of course I didn’t take the bus this morning, I used my Harry Potter floo powder to get to the library.

Other than dressing up, how can we celebrate books this World Book Day? There are lots of ideas on the WBD website, and hopefully many of us will visit our local independent bookshop to spend our £1 Book Day tokens. My son has a chart to fill in from school, in which he has to ask different members of society which is their favourite book and why. And he asked me.

“One book” I shrieked. What torture! And then I realised which it was.

Little Women

Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
This book is unique. I don’t think it can be pigeonholed as a children’s book, nor an adult book – although is often labelled as a classic. It’s historical, but not pegged as an historical novel. It’s semi-autobiographical (Louisa May Alcott didn’t correct readers writing her letters addressed to ‘Miss March’, but replied as if she were Jo.) It’s about feminism. It’s also a family saga, and a coming of age book. I suppose it was one of the first YA titles, although most children seem to read it as they reach the upper level of middle grade – about age 10-13yrs.
Little Women tells the story of four sisters, Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy, during the American Civil War. Their father is absent, fighting in the war, and their mother is left to raise the girls alone. As they grow from children into adulthood, they face dramas of friendships, illness, arguments, breaking free from constraints of domesticity, and explore first love. The book highlights the wonder of storytelling, as well as espousing moral virtue over materialism, but the wonder of the book for many lies in the depth of characterisation of the four sisters.
They are each so well-defined that, as with Pooh, Piglet and Eeyore, you can remember the character traits of Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy long into your own adulthood. Meg, the beautiful compliant daughter; Jo, the non-conformist hot-tempered tomboy; Beth, the shy, quiet creature, whose sacrificial death can be read as the death of the era of quiet domesticity; and finally Amy, the vain and self-centred baby of the family, who nevertheless excels at art and pursues her passion for it no matter the cost. It teaches such important lessons subtly – women’s access to education, overcoming shyness and having confidence, practising small kindnesses, charitable acts, and the importance of a sense of humour too. Little Women was even mentioned in that long-running television comedy Friends, when the girls ruined the story for Joey by telling him what happens to Beth in that devastatingly sad chapter, Dark Days. I don’t think there’s any other book from which I can remember the actual chapter titles. The description of Christmas with the Marches made me long for an American family Christmas just like theirs, and even made me consider calling my  mother ‘Marmee’. It’s a beautiful re-read, and works wonderfully as a ‘read-aloud’ too. I implore you to revisit it – and then give it to your children.

So I chose my one book. However, the fun of being a children’s book blogger and writer is that I don’t have to choose one book. I blog twice a week (sometimes more) about all the amazing books there are for children to read. And I have to read the books to enable me to blog. I interview the authors and tweet with other writers. It’s a privileged and rewarding task. Every day for me is World Book Day.

 

A Whisper of Wolves by Kris Humphrey, illustrated by Chellie Carroll

A Whisper of Wolves
A new fantasy series of the ilk of Michelle Paver, but in a much simpler vein for a younger reader. Set in a time of castles and kings, forests and earthy magic, the book focuses on the whisperers – guardians of the wild, people who have been chosen for their ability to communicate with an animal and protect the landscape and villages in which they live. This first book in the series focuses on two whisperers – Alice and Dawn, and their respective animal companions, Storm a wolf, and Ebony a raven. They have to fight against the evil presence of the Narlaw – dangerous entities who suck the life from human beings and leave them in a sleep-like trance. The book explores the natural landscape, with long adventurous journeys through woods and streams, in deep ravines and up high cliffs. A group of feisty females dominate the novel, from the whisperers who teach their new apprentices, to the princess in the castle, and the past Queen who won the previous Narlaw war.  For a more experienced reader there are clear echoes of the Dementors from Harry Potter in the guise of the Narlaw, and other devices pulled from children’s literature – but this is a good starting point for a young reader wanting to access fantasy novels. An easy-to-follow plot, intertwined with some excellent vocabulary and great imagery. Looking forward to reading more in the series. Published 2nd March, 2015.