monsters

Halloween Reads

Scared? You should be. Halloween Treats (no tricks) from me.

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Hyde and Squeak by Fiona Ross

It’s amazing how much influence classic tales can wield over modern culture and modern children’s storytelling. Fiona Ross has taken inspiration from Stevenson’s Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde to draw a story about a mouse with a dark side. Squeak is a cute endearing mouse with oversize whiskers and a bowtie, who lives with ‘Granny’, a rounded, gentle looking elderly woman with purple hair fashioned into a bun.

But when Squeak samples some rather off-looking jelly, he turns into Hyde, a monster-mouse with an all-consuming appetite.

Told in large comic book frames, this is a wonderfully funny picture book, with the cartoon illustrations leading the story – one can almost see the Simpsons-style Halloween episodes in their similar transformation from normal to spooky characterisation. Hyde’s pages have black backgrounds, with many details in grayscale outlines, letting huge Hyde dominate the page. His expression is crazed, one eye in bloodshot swirls, a cobwebby bowtie and protruding vampire teeth.

Of course, every so often Hyde overstuffs himself, and his farts turn him back into Squeak. Towards the end, Granny has to zap the monster-eating-machine Hyde has become to regain her lovable Squeak, which she does mainly using pieces of fruit – never has a banana-wielding grandma looked quite so aggressive.

This is fun from start to end, silly and engaging, and an excellent introduction to literature’s classics! You can buy it here.

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Shifty McGifty and Slippery Sam: The Spooky School by Tracy Corderoy and Steven Lenton

Originally in picture book format, Shifty McGifty and Slippery Sam are two dogs who started their careers as robbers, but realised that crime doesn’t pay and so turned their skills to cupcake making. Although adept at baking, they also solve mysteries and foil crime.

Now in two-colour chapter book format for newly independent readers, these books combine three stories in one book. The Spooky School is a vibrant two-tone orange and black for Halloween, and starts with a Halloween story as the two dogs help a class of schooldogs make Halloween treats for a midnight feast. But there’s a ghost at large in the school, and Shifty and Sam have to catch it before it eats all the tasty treats!

The other two stories feature power-hungry Red Rocket (a red panda with evil intentions), and some raccoons raiding a museum. In both, the reader cheers on the heroes as they foil both dastardly plans with some rather ingenious baking implements. Our pups ski on baguettes, use walkie-talkie croissants, and thwart villains by firing cream cakes at them.

Each adventure is warm, witty and engaging, and illustrated with fun and panache. The text and pictures marry perfectly and children will devour as readily as if the cupcakes on the page were real. An excellent introduction to adventure storytelling. For newly independent readers, 6+ years. You can buy it here.

horror-handbook

The Horror Handbook by Paul van Loon, illustrated by Axel Scheffler

This is a the ultimate nightmare for all librarians. A fact book about fictional things. Yes, The Horror Handbook does exactly as it describes – it provides information on ghosts, monsters, vampires and all kinds of Halloween-type creatures. Slightly tongue-in-cheek, the book guides the reader through the horror genre, revealing the definition of vampires, how to become a werewolf (should one wish to), and how to protect yourself from witches (should one need to).

But it also contains fact – a section on horror movies that describes the genres within this genre – films about monsters, werewolves, aliens and a host of others, as well as a section on classic horror books, including Frankenstein, Dracula and Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. And various factual tidbits are sprinkled throughout the book, such as that vampire bats do exist and what they are.

But as well as the fun, lively tone of the book, there are also the immensely funny illustrations, courtesy of Scheffler, including a brilliant transformation of ordinary bloke to werewolf, the milkman test for werewolves, and instructions for protection against the evil eye. All hilarious, all well worth a look.

Any child who’s interested in reading the book will obviously have a strong stomach anyway, but there are graphic sections on how to kill a vampire (ramming a stake through its heart and nailing it to the bottom of the coffin – meanwhile watching out for spurting blood), as well as instructing your child to google ‘vampire hunters’, so you may wish to talk through things with your child before they devour the book!

This is an immensely fun handbook with anecdotes, trivia, films, and endless references to all the horror one could possibly want on Halloween. Be scared. Be super prepared! Age 9+ years. Have a scare here.

tales-of-horror

Tales of Horror by Edgar Allan Poe

If you’ve an older child who can get past the somewhat difficult language, then you should definitely let them be scared stupid by Poe’s Tales of Horror. Or read them yourself. Poe, as everyone knows, had a knack for writing unfailing misery and horror, a sense of insufferable gloom:

“There was an iciness, a sinking, a sickening of the heart – an unredeemed dreariness of thought which no goading of the imagination could torture into aught of the sublime.”

From the tale of the man who buries alive his twin sister in The Fall of the House of Usher to the unreliable narrator and prison horror of The Pit and the Pendulum, to the famous and utterly horrifying Tell-Tale Heart, which keeps on beating and induces the narrator to succumb to his guilt, these are brilliant stories whether you are reading them for the first time, or revisiting.

His stories plunge depths of darkness, immorality and despair, often featuring characters devoid of family. Some are gothic and narrated by unreliable, anonymous narrators who appear insane or unhinged in some way and thus there is no distraction from the tension within. But most of all, they’re great fun – spot the allusions to mirrors, doppelgangers, masks, and returnees from the dead. For teens and adults. Get your Poe here.

 

Max Helsing: Monster Hunter by Curtis Jobling

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Okay, confession time. I’m not a big ‘monster genre’ lover. I didn’t watch Buffy (gasp!), or True Blood, or The Walking Dead, but thinking back I did enjoy reading and studying Frankenstein, and I did recently adore reading the Darkmouth series for kids.

So I didn’t think that I’d love Max Helsing: Monster Hunter, quite as much as I did. I should have known really, author and illustrator Curtis Jobling blew me away when he recently turned a drawing of Bob the Builder into a zombie – which is pretty much what my son did when he had me watching the show night after night.

Jobling’s latest book – the first in a new series – caught me with its prologue – an epically depicted piece of writing that pits Max against an adolescent vampire and shakes a teen girl from its hypnotic grip. The vocabulary is electrifying – Jobling’s first description of a monster in the book is tremendous and reels the reader in for more.

Max Helsing, thirteen year old American boy, is descended from a long lineage of monster hunters, and keeps his town safe from demons and prowling ghoulies. However, when he discovers he’s ‘marked’ by the monster world, things turn a little more gruesome and he must escape the curse of an ancient vampire who will do anything to end the Helsing lineage.

This isn’t groundbreaking stuff – Jobling hasn’t reinvented the wheel – and the book fits snugly into the monster hunter genre, yet there’s something about Max Helsing that makes it stand out from the crowd.

It could be the sardonic wit of our protagonist, an intensely likeable laid-back nonchalant teen who chucks wisecracks at the monsters, wins battles mainly through luck and general unorthodoxy rather than great skill, and shows an adorable soft side, wanting to win hearts and minds rather than kill.

Or, his kickass sidekicks – Syd, a girl into engineering, and a boy called Wing Liu, who, surprisingly, after having been made out originally to be a somewhat frightened neighbourhood kid, turns into a deadpan risk taker.

There are some intensely hammy moments – Max’s birthday celebrations where a new monster is born – a teenager – and the explanation of the Grimm brothers as writing a non-fiction manual for the future, but the action scenes are full of gore and fun:

“The severed tendril flailed wildly, oozing green fluid into the air with a sound not unlike a deflating whoopee cushion.”

The setting is slightly wobbly – it’s based in New England, but feels English at times. This is forgivable as the action moves around so seamlessly. A Monster Reference guide complete with excellent illustrations by Jobling himself adds an extra element to the book.

Overall, it feels written with love. They say you should write the book you’d want to read for yourself – I imagine that’s exactly what Curtis Jobling has done. Kids will monster munch it up.

Age 9+. You can buy it here.

How To Draw Nibbles

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Nibbles The Book Monster by Emma Yarlett
Bursting through my door, and through his own front cover, Nibbles is one of the cutest monsters I have ever had the pleasure to meet. Nibbles will eat through anything, but his favourite food appears to be books – and during the passage of this picture book he nibbles through several favourite fairy tales, including Little Red Riding Hood, Jack and the Beanstalk and Goldilocks and the Three Bears. He not only chews on the pages, but manipulates the story, adding a twist to each book within the book. With flaps to lift, holes in pages, a page in which Nibbles is hidden among thousands of book titles, and books within the book (although with holes through them), this is an adventure in paper as well as story.

The illustrations are delightful – acute attention to detail, hilarious renderings of Goldilocks, a grumpy diva-ish Little Red Riding Hood, as well as books everywhere on every page. It’s a marvellous celebration of story and illustration and the magic of modern day book-making.

The text talks to the reader – we have to keep Nibbles in check ourselves, so that the involvement with the reader is complete – to the very back cover. It’s an interactive book with a wonderful sense of play. An exceptional picture book for children aged 3+ years and way beyond. Nibble your way through the bookstore to purchase your own Nibbles here.

Author and illustrator Emma Yarlett has very kindly agreed to show you how to draw Nibbles yourself. So, in good old-fashioned Blue Peter style – I’m handing over to Emma:

How to Draw Nibbles

First lightly draw a circle

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Lightly draw on some long triangles…

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Now this monster needs legs and feet. This monster loves to go places fast. Draw two bendy upside down straws…

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And voila they are legs and feet! Uh-oh.

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Oi! Nibbles come back, you’ve got no eyes, you’re going to bang into the edge of the…

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Told you. Now come back here. Let’s give him some eyes before he hurts himself. Two beady big eyes.

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And two naughty little stripy horns.

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And we’re finished!

Oh wait, I think there might be something important missing…

Ah yes! How can a Book Monster nibble without his nibbley mouth?

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Draw a big bendy sausage. Add some triangle teeth and…

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Watch out! Thanks Emma. You can now go to twitter to find Nibbles. I think he’s hiding in one of my bookshelves. Find me on twitter @minervamoan and you’ll see my competition to win a Nibbles book and toy. Nibbles is hiding in my twitter bookshelf (see tweet). Tweet me which title Nibbles is diving into, using the hashtag #FindNibbles. All correct answers go into a daily draw and one person will be chosen by Little Tiger Press to go forward into a prize draw at the end of the blog tour.