picturebooks

Habitats, Biomes, Ecosystems

Following on from Earth Day on Monday, and my review of some Oceans books, I wanted to share a few more books that really shine with their content about Planet Earth.

wildernessWilderness: Earth’s Amazing Habitats by Mia Cassany, Marcos Navarro
This oversize book showcases sixteen amazing habitats around the world from the Niokolo-Koba National Park in Senegal to the Qinling Mountains of China and beyond, and yet this is not scientific discovery so much as an impressive display of the effect achieved by digital artistry. Each page is an abundance of colour and pattern, and settles on a particular species native to that habitat. For example, Bengal tigers in Sundarbans National Park, geckos in the tropical rainforests of Madagascar. In this latter case, the illustration shows their intense brown and pink patterned bodies carefully camouflaged against similarly defined leaves – even the shapes fit together. On some spreads the animals are better hidden than others, leading the reader to seek and celebrate the creature within. Very scant text on each page gives a hint of the wildlife within and the beauty of the area. There is an emphasis on conservation and protection of species, and a world map to locate each habitat.

Each page feels more exotic than the last with an intricate web of colour and pattern creating the flora and fauna – the Tehuacan-Cuicatlan Valley is a riot of colour and densely laid pattern so that the cactus plants feel as if they stretch back and back, giving depth and perspective.

At the end of the book is a find out more section – intelligently showing each double page in miniature with the creatures labelled and identified, and showing how many creatures are depicted (you’ll be amazed at how many you missed first time round). There is factual content here too. An absorbing coffee-table-like book that will keep children enthralled and inspired as much by the artwork and design as by the creatures and information within. It’ll have them clamouring to visit far-flung places. You can buy it here.

incredible ecosystemsThe Incredible Ecosystems of Planet Earth by Rachel Ignotofsky
Ignotofsky’s distinctive style is highly recognisable from the very popular Women in Science book, but here she turns her attention to ecosystems. This is indeed an ‘incredible’ book in the level of detail of information provided, but also in the detail of the illustrations, diagrams, and presentation. From the biome map in the beginning, with its bright coloured key and succinct explanation, to the graphic representation of the food web and flow of energy, in every diagram and illustration and every caption there is a wealth of information.

This is comprehensive and yet incredibly readable. Teaching so much – for example, the importance of the edges of the ecosystem, to microscopic ecosystems, a great deal of information is covered in a short space, for the examples I have mentioned so far are just the beginning. The book then branches out into the different areas of the world, pinpointing particular parts such as the ecosystem of the Alps, a redwood forest, the Mojave Desert and much more.

Aquatics are dealt with next, and then plants, carbon cycle (with a super illustration that not only informs but amuses with its distinctive personality), water cycle (check out the smiling clouds), and of course the impact of humans, positive and negative. In fact, this viewpoint informs most of the book – there is a slant in the text to the wonders of the natural world and humans’ responsibility to appreciate, protect and nurture, lending it a child-centric vision rather than purely scientific. The glossary is illustrated too – there isn’t a page that doesn’t amaze, result in further examination, or stimulate curiosity. Quite a feat. You can buy it here.

paper world planet earthPaper World: Planet Earth by Bomboland and Ruth Symons
Not always won over by clever gatefolds or pop-up designs as they can tend to be gimmicky, this book proves that used correctly, paper engineering can inform, inspire and dazzle.

Looking through Earth to see its different layers in lift-up flaps, or feeling the slits and cut outs that show oceanic crusts and oceanic ridges, or pulling up a flap to reveal an underwater volcano, the clever cutting and shaping of the pages gives literal layers of depth and perspective to the biomes the authors wish to showcase.

The newness of the book meant I had to run my hands along the pages to find the flaps, at the same time giving me a physical awareness of the lines of the book – cut out lines in the illustration that highlight the currents in the sea, the canyons in the mountains, the build up of cloud in a tornado.

This is a shrewd design, teaching geography in a physical and tactile way. The text is clear and precise too. Short sharp sentences explaining layers and processes with ease. Detailing tectonic plates, glaciers, caves, deserts, weather and more. You can buy it here.

the nature girlsThe Nature Girls by Aki
This phenomenally feminist and ultra modern exciting book portrays a group of girls exploring the world’s habitats, all in rhyming verse.

Although a collective group in their yellow outfits and hats, each is different in the colour of their hair, skin, arrangement of body language or expression on their faces.

They swim with dolphins, trek the land, ride camels across sand, explore woodland and traverse snowy tundra. The illustrations are unique and surprising, from the patterned mountains of ice to the exotic jungle and the colourful sea.

For young readers who want to start learning about habitats, this is a bright beautiful picture book, with facts about the different biomes at the back. Perfect early learning.

You can buy it here.

plastic planetPlastic Panic! By Robin Twiddy
Of course to keep our planet as wonderful as the books above describe, we need to work a little harder at looking after it.

This up-to-date non-fiction book attempts to explain the explosion of plastic usage and why it’s dangerous to our planet. Each colourful spread uses a mixture of photos and diagrams to explore why the human race started using so much plastic, and when they realised it was a problem, before ultimately explaining what the reader can do about it.

Starting with a message from the future, it carefully details the history of plastic – how great it seemed to start with – and then explains the level of toxins within plastic and its longevity. There are facts and figures – up to 2018, and a glossary at the back. Three informative double pages at the end talk through recycling, reusing and reducing, with community ideas and scientific solutions. An excellent tool for educating and responding. You can buy it here.

A Q&A with New Rising Star Illustrator and Author, Fifi Kuo

the perfect sofaIt’s always exciting to discover a new illustrator, so I can imagine Boxer Books delight to find Fifi Kuo and commission four picture books from her straightaway. And it was no surprise to find that Kuo’s first picture book, I Can Fly, is longlisted for the Klaus Flugge Prize and shortlisted for the Read it Again! Picture Book Award and the Huckepack Picture Book Prize. Kuo’s second book, The Perfect Sofa, dropped through my post box just as I was looking for a new sofa – and her message that we should be grateful for what we have – sometimes the perfect fit is right in front of us all the time – couldn’t be more spot on.

Smitten with Kuo’s expressive, spirited illustrations, and the neat messages behind her books, I was delighted to be able to ask Fifi some questions. And Fifi kindly answered in English for us, even though it isn’t her first language.

The penguin features in both I Can Fly and The Perfect Sofa. What is it about the penguin that makes it such a good animal to illustrate and use to express human emotions (anthropomorphism) in picture books? 

I believe that every creature in this world has their own emotions and feelings. So I don’t really consider giving an animal human feelings because I just see that an animal has feelings! I especially love to draw animals. When I’m drawing them I feel happy. When I was making ‘I Can Fly’, I realized that somehow, and I can’t explain why, drawing a penguin made me much happier than drawing other animals. I live in a tropical climate whilst penguins live in the South- Pole, somewhere I haven’t visited, so I have to imagine the extreme cold. I’ve loved penguins since I was a little child and this may be because they are different to birds in the way that they do not build a traditional nest and because they do not fly in the sky.

An unfinished Fifi Kuo panda and penguin illustration

The panda and penguin are best friends. How do you make them interact so that they appear so well fitted together? (I’m particularly thinking of the illustration on your website that shows Panda posing as a statue, and Penguin attempting to sketch him!)

After I created the penguin, I felt that she must be a bit lonely because she didn’t have a friend. I thought that as penguins and pandas are both black and white, they would look perfect together. Never mind about where they live! I like to think about what characters have in common and why they might attract and I suppose, without thinking, I decided on an Asian animal because I live in Taiwan. But when I am drawing I don’t really think about how to do something. I just fall in love with my characters and wish they had been my friends when I was little. I was an only child so often felt lonely. I am sure that children read pictures and sometimes drawings can express feelings better than words. Children can see how close Penguin and Panda are without me repeating their feelings in words.

An illustration from I Can Fly

There is a strong element of humour in your picture books. Where do you think this comes from?

Oh! I really appreciate that you said that because I don’t consider myself to be a humorous person but I do think humour is important. Sometimes I make serious points but without preaching. I think it is much better to be kind, gentle and funny. Children can learn things effortlessly and I would rather they relaxed and enjoyed the book. It might be that they pick up what my message is first time or they may get it later. For example, in The Perfect Sofa, the message is really to appreciate and value what you have. New is not always best and, of course, friends are important. But I hope children will enjoy discovering that themselves and have fun on the way.

Do you own the perfect sofa?

Nope, unfortunately, I don’t have my own perfect sofa. But fortunately, I can always look forward to it!

I found out that I wanted a sofa when I got homesick after I had to move out from the campus accommodation when I was studying for my MA degree in Cambridge. I found it really hard, as an international student, to find a place to live. During that time, I started to think about what makes me feel at home. Then I discovered I’m totally a sofa-person.

I love to collect almost EVERYTHING … which often drives my parents crazy. These things also help me to feel at home. I collect labels, leaves, soft toys, candy papers, stamps, letters, cards … many, many things. Personally, I find it really hard to throw things away especially the things which bring back happy memories. It is funny how things can evoke memories.

i can flyWhat message do you want children to take away from your picture books?

My initial intention is to deliver the message of love. I believe there are many kinds of love. Many people love to go out shopping in a quest to find the perfect item or piece of clothing but what I think is important is shared experience and discovering that you can be happy when you are content with what you have and kind to other people. It is nice to look at familiar things with new eyes and to discover that new is not always best. Even better to have a friend by you when you make that journey. Sometimes life tells us that nothing is totally perfect but if we look we will find some tiny thing or person that could be perfect. All we need to do is to see it and cherish it. Sometimes you already have the perfect things!

Which illustrators/children’s authors influence you?

Raymond Briggs, Wolf Erlbruch and I feel passionate about Jimmy Liao (not just because he is also Taiwanese). I think he should be much better known in the UK. He is an absolute genius and shows us that picture books can be enjoyed on so many different levels and that they are for everyone. The artists also show us that children can understand difficult subjects, such as loss and death, which adults sometimes find difficult to discuss.

Did you have a favourite book as a child?

The Snowman. I still love it! I read it in Taiwan when I was very young and had never seen snow. I love the friendship between the boy and the snowman and the bird’s eye view of the world. Of course, it is a wordless picture book but I would still say that I read it and each time, I still find something new in Raymond Briggs’s fabulous pictures.

Fifi Kuo

Fifi Kuo

You’ve said you like to draw trees and houses – what is it about these that attracts you?

I studied Landscape Architecture in my BA degree, and that’s the thing I was most familiar with when I first learned ‘illustration’. When I studied illustration, I used to draw trees and houses because they were in my comfort zone. I’m the person who almost always lacks confidence. Even now, I still think I’m not a ‘good illustrator’, but I’ll always try my best to keep going and telling stories. I love what I do. I wouldn’t want to do anything else, but I still need to gain confidence.

What was your reaction upon hearing your book deal?

I couldn’t believe it. I was SO happy. One book is good – 4 is out of this world. David and Leilani at Boxer Books are so good to work with. They listen to my ideas and help me grow. I feel so lucky. It is like a dreamy journey. I am filled with thankfulness.

Can you give us an idea of your work desk/bench? Is it near a window? Do you have a special pen?

Fifi’s desk

A big table is definitely necessary. It’s near a window… I love the window! I love the light and the fact I can look out and day-dream.

I love to recycle things to make homes for my colour-pencils. Better than buying plastic storage items!

Usually, my working table is totally a mess. Sometimes I clean it up when the switch in my brain is accidentally turned on to clear-up mode!

I don’t have any special pen, but I do have a few colours I always love to grab. I like to illustrate in different ways using pens, inks, collage … I love to experiment. And I will always continue to learn, to see things as if I am looking at them for the first time and to draw from the heart.

With huge thanks to Fifi Kuo. Each of Kuo’s picture books is unique, but equally each pulses with emotion and humour, and the drawings are gentle and endearing, fierce and funny. I highly recommend a look at both I Can Fly and The Perfect Sofa. You can buy I Can Fly here and The Perfect Sofa here.

Everyone Can Draw and The Magic Hug: A Book about Emotions are published later this year.

National Unicorn Day

once upon a unicorn hornFor the past few months, the children in my library club have been obsessed with unicorns. They seek out pony books in the library in the hope that they reference unicorns, and there is a waiting list for the few unicorn books we do stock. The trend sees no sign of waning at the moment. So, on this National Unicorn Day I have great pleasure in bringing you news of two new unicorn books. Once Upon a Unicorn Horn by Beatrice Blue explains how this very special creature obtained its horn, in a picture book story about friendship and perseverance. With just the right level of cute without being saccharine, and an endearing amount of magical thinking, the little girl in the book, June, and her parents come up with a solution to help a tiny horse to fly.

I’m delighted to host author Beatrice Blue discussing “who we are and how we choose to be”.

This is what Once Upon a Unicorn cherishes. It is the first title in a new picture book series about how magical creatures came to have their special features.

Do you happen to know how unicorns got their horns?

It all began one day when a little girl called June found some tiny horses learning how to fly in her garden, but one of them was very sad because he couldn’t. Little June found a very fun and sweet way to make her friend fly!

Once Upon a Unicorn Horn talks about about how and where to find magic.

One of my main goals in Once Upon a Unicorn Horn was to make a book where the child’s point of view is the most important. To treasure childhood and to focus on feelings, discovery and self acknowledgement. And above all, fun.

Most books about unicorns I’ve seen are pink or jumpy, bubbly pony happiness and rainbow related. This is fun, but I wanted to show the  importance of the magical creature and human values.

As a child, I wanted to be like Merlin, Hermione Granger, Dumbledore, Matilda and so many other great magicians. As much as I tried moving things with my mind, whispering spells from ancient books or swooshing wands that my dad carved for me out of shoe holders, I could never find my magic.

Beatrice Blue

Beatrice Blue

Eventually, I realised that I had magic inside me all along. I didn’t need to become anybody else. I was making it happen day by day.

Children don´t need to be anybody else but themselves. They might need encouragement to believe in themselves and to use their imagination, but they can make us see the world from an entirely new perspective;  and this book celebrates that.

We can enjoy our surroundings and find magic even in the tiniest of things. And bring unicorns to life with the tiniest gestures.

Once Upon a Unicorn Horn embraces the present and the choices we make, and shows us that it is possible to make the most out of every situation. Sometimes mistakes or accidents create startling surprises and wonderful opportunities. That’s magic!

With huge thanks to author and illustrator Beatrice Blue for explaining her reasons for writing Once Upon a Unicorn Horn, which you can buy here.

the secret lives of unicornsThe second unicorn book is The Secret Lives of Unicorns by Dr Temisa Seraphini and Sophie Robin. This is an encyclopedic volume of unicorn knowledge, exploring anatomy, evolution, life cycle and magical properties. In a fantastical book of pseudo-nonfiction, Dr Seraphini looks at different unicorn species from around the world. Presented as if they were real, there are taxonomy charts, references to unicorns from different eras on a timeline, and illustrations to match, including a height chart, dissection of flight, and even a page on famous unicornologists. You can discover the different species, from winged, to mountain, to volcanic unicorns, and read how best to interact with unicorns, looking closely at the illustrated facial expressions.

Illustrated in muted tones of orange, green and blue, this guide will delight unicorn fans, whilst also showing them how a nonfiction book functions, and is a comprehensive study of how a fantasy world can be constructed. You can buy it here.

 

April Showers

home in the rainHome in the Rain by Bob Graham
Turning the everyday into something extraordinary, Graham is the master of embracing a child’s view of the world. This wonderful little tale follows Francie and her mum as they drive home in torrential rain from Grandma’s house. The illustrations loop in and out of the car, as the reader sees the small red car jammed between lorries and oil-tankers on the highway, before zooming into the backseat with Francie, and then out into the countryside tucked away beyond the road, with the wildlife sheltering from the wet, and up into the air as a kestrel dives.

Graham explores the sights, sounds and smells of the everyday – from an argument at an interchange, to the smell of farmyards, the squeaky sound as Francie writes on the steamed up car window, rainbow oil puddles, the noise of the radio, and finally into Francie’s imagination as she wonders what her new baby sister will be named when she’s born.

The observational perspectives of the book pick out what’s familiar and what’s new, just like the coming of a new baby. It’s an atmospheric book, empathetic, and both words and pictures express a softness that feels soothing – an ‘everything’s going to be alright’ tone. You can buy it here. 

rhythm of the rainThe Rhythm of the Rain by Grahame Baker-Smith
A book that takes an image of a small boy playing in his favourite pool on the mountainside, opens up to huge scope as it portrays Earth’s water cycle.

Isaac sees clouds dark above him, the rain pours down into the pool creating streams that flow into the river near his house (beautifully cast on stilts). The book then follows the river into the sea.

It is the ambition of the book that is so impressive. Baker-Smith conveys the cycle of water of course, explaining the ocean steaming into mist, but the magic lies within the water’s journey. He conveys how water adds to the environment, how humans, animals and vegetation interact with it across the globe and throughout time. Water is important and transient, both gentle and powerful. He shows the different ways in which water presents – its stillness in a jar of water, plunging waterfalls, laughing streams, meandering rivers, churning waves. Water is commodity, yet nature, utilitarian resource, yet something to be protected. Pure and simple in its magnitude.

And all the while referring back to Isaac. Each page is an illustrative work of art, and the words ebb and flow like poetry. The use of light in the artworks is extraordinary – Isaac’s reflection in the water as he stands in the natural pool is haunting and wondrous. Not to be missed. Buy your copy here. 

once upon a raindropOnce Upon a Raindrop by James Carter, illustrated by Nomoco
This too is the story of water, but so utterly different in style. Nomoco’s abstract watercolour feels almost like the different types of water itself – sometimes looping down the pages in the form of water-carrying pipes, at others winding its way across the page like a river. There are droplets too – inkstains in circles across a page – and always accompanied by Carter’s poetry as he explores the facts of the matter in lyrics.

Starting with the beginning of time, Carter tracks water on meteors that carry ice, all the way through to water’s uses today – keeping humans clean and healthy – as well as life’s overwhelming necessity for water.

Because each page is so different from the next, both in form of poem and execution of illustration, it allows the reader to dissect the different formations of water and the different elements to it. Modern, fresh and impactful, this makes for a refreshing imbibing of information. Get wet here.

Picture Book Round Up Spring 2019: Animals

the big race
The Big Race by David Barrow
Never normally one to agree with awarding certificates simply for taking part, this book may have changed my mind.

Aardvark is small and doesn’t have the skillset of the other animals, the crocodile, cheetah, buffalo and African hoopoe, taking part in the race. And stamina, strength and speed are required in this ‘great race’, which involves running, cycling, diving off a waterfall, swimming, tightrope walking, rope swinging and parachuting from a hot air balloon – all in the natural African landscape.

Aardvark doesn’t give up, showing resilience all the way through – battling on her scooter against the other animals’ bikes, using armbands to swim underwater – never succumbing to her tiredness and misfortune.  She’s the only one whose parachute goes awry, for example. And she shows immense pleasure at her medal – simply being rewarded for taking part (as she should, this is one tough race!).

Barrow’s illustrations throughout are a delight. Any animal race will be reminiscent of The Hare and the Tortoise, but Barrow’s vision is modern and fresh, with relentless movement and humour in the pictures. You can buy it here.

kiss the crocodile
Kiss the Crocodile by Sean Taylor and Ben Mantle
This playful, happy book also features a group of animals, this time as friends, a monkey, a tortoise and an anteater, playing in their natural habitat, splashing in rivers, making up monsters, doing silly dancing. They are a little intimidated to play with Little Crocodile though, with his many teeth and sharp claws. The naughty Crocodile mother (and adult readers will laugh inwardly here) suggests a game of ‘Kiss the Crocodile’, a sort of daring game.

This is, in essence, a simple and oft-repeated message about letting everyone join in, but the illustrations are so impossibly endearing, the monkey so impish, the crocodile so self-assured, that it makes reading an absolute pleasure. Even more pleasure if you read it aloud (with its repetition and suspense). Well executed and great fun. Kissable. You can buy it here.

dinosaur department store
The Dinosaur Department Store by Lily Murray and Richard Merritt
Looking for something more ferocious than a crocodile – how about a dinosaur? The pictures tell the reader that Eliza Jane (a human girl) is obsessed with dinosaurs, from dressing up as one, to the shape of her cuddly toy, to the pictures adorning her walls. So when, rather delightfully, she tells her parents that now she is four she wants a real dinosaur (rhyming is throughout), there is only one place to visit – the dinosaur department store.

Here, with flourish and eccentricity, the department store owner shows Eliza Jane all the different types of dinosaurs, only to be annoyed that his time has been wasted when she declares at the end that she no longer wants a dinosaur pet. Why not? The clues have been in the pictures all along. An excellent rhyming picture book that’s vibrant, exuberant and fun, with pictures telling the other half of the story. Highly recommend. You can buy it here.

lots of frogs
Lots of Frogs by Howard Calvert and Claudia Boldt
More fun and frolics and rhymes in this jumping book about frogs. Tommy brings his box of frogs into school, and unfortunately for the staff, they don’t remain in the box for long. Calvert has great fun exploring the different places around the school that the frogs might inhabit (including the Headteacher’s hair), and also ways in which Tommy might capture them again.

What’s more Calvert, and illustrator Boldt, imbue the frogs with lots of personality – they are as cheeky as monkeys. Lots to admire here – the frogs almost seem to be like schoolchildren themselves – very human, and Calvert introduces numbers, eating habits and so on. One slightly dodgy rhyme, but on the whole a great fun read that will have the class clamouring to bring in their own pets. Or certainly to be read the story again. You can buy it here.

five more minutes
Five More Minutes by Marta Altes
Anthropomorphic foxes in this sympathetic look at how children and parents view the concept of time differently. Reminiscent of some of the Jill Murphy picture books, this representation of a sprightly family and their everyday lives is both wise and heartwarming. Five more minutes means something very different for the child or adult as they view the various moments in their lives. For Dad (the primary caregiver), five more minutes at a children’s party feels long whereas five more minutes in bed feels short.

On the way to school, fox is doubtful of his father’s protestations that there is no time – they need to hurry – but the young fox makes time for jumping in puddles, watching the birds and more. Conversely, for the young fox, waiting for a cake to bake takes ages: there is too much time. The illustrations are kind and forgiving, the Dad always attentive and loving, the house ordinary and familiar, the expressions well-articulated. Take a particular look at the little foxes’ faces when eating the cupcakes. Some things are worth waiting for. Pre-order your picture book here now.

what clara saw
What Clara Saw by Jessica Meserve
Meserve has a way with illustration. Her child characters are hugely differentiated, personalities zinging from the page, and she holds an astounding attention to detail – the shoelaces of the children like little wings, the crafting of the teacher, Mr Biggity, as condescending, before the reader has even read a word. Is it his long nose, his large nostril, the upturn of his toe, his hand positioning, the way his eye glances back at the children. He’s going to be tricky.

And thus it proves, on an outing to a wildlife park, Mr Biggity dismisses the animals as being vastly inferior, when Clara, with the red coat, notices that animals are rather good at communicating and feeling. The reader will notice how observant Clara is, and if they too are observant, they’ll witness a whole other story just by ‘reading the pictures’ rather than listening to the text. A book that encourages thought and debate about how much animals feel, and perhaps even about how much we should stand up for what we believe to be true rather than being mindlessly fed false information. Exquisite illustrations. You can buy it here.

rhino neil
Rhino Neil by Mini Goss
A simpler message in this animal book about not judging someone from the way they look. Rhino Neil is huge and the other animals stay away from him. After all, he has a huge horn that might spike, fearsome feet that trample, and a tremendous tummy that can fit lots in it, as well as a big bottom that could squash everyone.

When an even bigger animal arrives by truck, the animals are all scared – except for Rhino Neil, who accepts the new elephant as his friend – and sometimes even feels small next to him. It’s not fully explained where the animals are – a wildlife park perhaps – and it’s a shame that all the animals aren’t accepting and make friends with the rhino and elephant at the end, despite their size, but this is an interesting take on the idea of size and may entertain some. Bright images and close-ups of body parts. You can buy it here.

A Little Bit Brave: Sketches by Nicola Kinnear

a little bit braveFrom the moment I set eyes on Logan, the stay-at-home bunny who features in A Little Bit Brave by Nicola Kinnear, I rather fell for him. Logan is first seen sitting comfortably and knitting, a steaming mug nearby, alongside a bookcase almost as packed as mine. He is listening, rapt, to the daring adventures of his companion Luna – herself mid-leap, wooden spoon thrust as if it were a sword, as she acts out her latest adventure with passion and zest.

All of Kinnear’s drawings are equally immersive in this book about plucking up the courage to have adventures. Logan does eventually venture outside, away from his knitting, and tries to join Luna in her adventures, but the world outside can hold danger, and in the end he might have to face up to it alone – albeit to save his friend.

There’s a great camaraderie between Logan and Luna, which takes a simple but effective look at wanting to please a friend and sticking up for them, but also how enormous courage surfaces when confronting dangers.

Kinnear effectively explores the colours and sights of the natural world in her imagined woodland, giving the animals enough anthropomorphic features to render the scenarios and behaviours familiar to a young child.

Here, Kinnear shows the fun she had in creating her two rabbits, and kindly gives us an insight into her creative process:

brave

“These are some early sketches of the characters, Logan and Luna. I really love this part of the project where I can play around with creating characters, figuring out how they are going to look and what their personalities are.”

“I knew from very early on, that the story was going to be about two very different, contrasting rabbits; one brave, and the other scared. The rabbits were really fun and expressive to draw and I could use their ears a lot to convey their emotions.”

A Little Bit Brave by Nicola Kinnear (Scholastic) is available now. You can buy a copy here. It’s a glorious new picture book, perfect for scared little ones, or those being brave and confronting adventures.

Hello Lighthouse by Sophie Blackall

There are some settings we associate with stories and literature more than others: deep dark forests with shadowy trees and dangerous creatures; choppy seas that tumble boats and threaten lives; castles with tall turrets and dragons soaring overhead; derelict houses with cracked brickwork and hidden dwellers.

And lighthouses. What is it about lighthouses that make them such fascinating fodder for children’s literature? Is it their loneliness, their proximity to the sea and potential danger and mishap, their ability to shine a light into the dark, or perhaps their history? Or all of these.

Sophie Blackall’s wonderfully astute picture book shines a light on all of these facets, but perhaps concentrates most on the history, drawing a picture of a particular fictional keeper of a specific made-up lighthouse.

Choosing a mix of Chinese ink and watercolour, Blackall imbues this picture book with a sense of timelessness as well as a clear sense of history, the mood fluctuating with the passing of time. This is, in essence about change.

Confronted first with illustrations that depict an old-fashioned black and white wedding photograph, a quill pen, a letter to a loved one, a needle and thread, the first pages feel like a log in themselves, a recording of what’s past. Then into the narrative, and Blackall starts with a bird’s eye view of the lighthouse – and an immense, colour-changing, highly patterned sea – looking part like a shoal of fish, part like a net, rendered in turquoises to pink, all surrounding the very stark red and white lighthouse on its small rocky island.

Each spread colours the sea differently – a deep blue with more traditional waves on one, a murkier green in a wind-swept double page, crashing waves with white foamy tops in another. The passing of time, the changing of seasons.

And within some spreads vignettes can be seen – smaller round circular pictures that show the life of our keeper, eating fish for his dinner, writing letters to loved ones, fishing out of the window. These circles are reminiscent of a boat’s portholes, or the face of a clock, or perhaps just the roundness of the rooms of the lighthouse.

But all hold a fascination – through them we see the cross-section of the lighthouse, but also the whole life of the keeper, from supplies being delivered, to a wife being delivered, to the wife herself delivering a baby, and then onto more dramatic scenarios including illness and rescues, until finally news comes that the lighthouse keeper himself is being replaced with a mechanism, and the family leaves for the mainland coast.

This most wonderful picture book tells both of the mundanity of the keeper’s life – the slow pace of the day, the importance of routine, the marking of time, but also the large changes around him too – the changes in weather from fog and storms to beautiful sunsets, the big changes that mark a life – weddings, births, and of course the leaps in mankind as science takes over.

The book is physically long and tall like a lighthouse, with red endpapers like the colour of a lighthouse top, and the illustrations as meticulous as the careful logbook of the keeper.

Cleverly, the text too matches the rhythm of the waves, the solitariness of the job. There is simplicity in the list of tasks, but also a poetry in the sound of the wind, the clanging of the bell for fog, the majesty of the wide sea.

A section at the end gives much more historical fact and detail, and explores the author’s inspiration. This is a mesmerising lyrical view of a lighthouse, and lighthouse life, which shines a beam of light into the children’s picture book section. Don’t crash on the rocks – find your lighthouse book here.

International Women’s Day 2019

I’m a keen viewer of University Challenge on the BBC, a quiz show for students. Recently, I’ve noticed more and more questions creep in that refer to women in history, previously unnoticed women composers and artists, those whom the layperson in the street definitely couldn’t identify. I admit, I don’t know enough about women in history either, and my shouting ‘Beethoven’ in answer to most questions just doesn’t cut it! Luckily, on this International Women’s Day, children’s publishers are waking up to these lesser-known important historical figures too. And so today’s collection is a definite celebration of women – from famous sisters in history, to lesser-known scientists and pioneers, to modern celebrity women pushing boundaries.

the bluest of bluesThe Bluest of Blues: Anna Atkins and the First Book of Photographs by Fiona Robinson
This extraordinarily exquisite picture book is a biography of British botanist and photographer, Anna Atkins, who lived 1799 to 1871, and used the newly-invented technology of cyanotype photography to record her catalogue of plant specimens.

What could be quite a dry biography is manipulated into an aesthetically intimate and touching portrayal of Anna, her enthusiasm and love for her craft – and a meshing of science and art, creativity hand-in-hand with discovery.

The book is cast in an illustrative shade of blue, mimicking the cyanotype’s blue and white tones – with Robinson cleverly incorporating the odd splash of red or yellow to emphasise inspiration – the first poppy Atkins examines, the roses in her marriage bouquet, the red ribbon round the gift of her first camera.

The book explores her life and works, and also the support from those around her, particularly her father, who educated his daughter in science, despite it being unusual at that time. This is good narrative non-fiction, delineating the scientific concepts of photography and botany, whilst remaining true to telling Atkins’ life. You can buy it here. 

the brontesThe Brontes by Anna Doherty
Another picture book that frames the world of important women in a single hue, this time a turquoise minty green. Of course, these sisters are well-known to many, but may be accessed for the first time by readers of this picture book, as it is squarely aimed at a young audience. Illustrations dominate the pages, as Doherty documents the girls’ life story from their childhood through to publication, illness and death.

A family tree starts the book, and individual profiles of the sisters and Branwell come near the end. The story is inflected with the author’s own perspective, clearly infused with feminist undertones as she explains how the sisters first published under male pseydonyms. The text is simplistic but clear, and the author takes the opportunity at the end of the book to articulate further social history, exploring why the Brontes were so fantastically feminist.

The book is marvellously attractive, speaking not only to the power of women, but to the power of imagination and story. An inspirational book that makes the world of the Brontes feel intimate, and fascinating. First in a series. Other titles include Ada Lovelace and Michelle Obama. You can buy it here. 

grace hopperGrace Hopper: Queen of Computer Code by Laurie Wallmark, illustrated by Katy Wu
With a rhyming poem on the endpapers introducing the scope of this lively picture book for youngsters, ‘Software tester. Workplace jester. Order seeker. Well-known speaker…’ the reader is immediately engrossed in this enthusiastic exploration of how Grace Hopper discovered computer code and became a trailblazing STEM advocate. What’s intriguing about this book is that it highlights that women’s involvement in computers and tech isn’t a recent phenomena  – Hopper was engaged from the beginning – she was a pioneer.

Hopper developed a ground-breaking way of writing computer code, as much from her understanding of how things work, numbers and logic, as from her intuition and creativity. The book carries that perpetually important message of determination and perseverance, especially in the face of adversity, and ends on a high hopeful note.

The full-colour, almost cartoonish illustrations provide an insight into the zest and energy that powered Hopper, from showing her as a frustrated but determined and curious little girl, to a hardworking, brave and intrepid Navy employee. Her insatiable curiosity and her ability to step away from code to find the answers in life as well, show her as a fully rounded, identifiable human. This is an informative and aspirational picture book – you’d do very well to show this to your sons and daughters. You can buy it here. 

one shotOne Shot by Tanya Landman
Ever since my parents took me to see Annie Get Your Gun in the West End as a child, I’ve had a thing about Annie Oakley. With numbers like ‘There’s No Business Like Show Business’, and ‘Anything You Can Do, I Can Do Better’, who wouldn’t be inspired by this trailblazing feminist? Landman’s novella on Annie Oakley’s childhood, One Shot, (which is completely fictionalised) is just as powerful and poignant, although in a very different way. Set in the later part of the 19th century, this sometimes disturbing, haunting book imagines Annie’s harsh upbringing – the death of her beloved father, her rejection by her mother, and her abusive treatment by adoptive parents (there are references to rape).

But mainly this is a compelling historical visualisation of the social normalities that Annie had to fight in order to prove her worth as a sharpshooter, to rebel against the constrictions imposed on her because of her gender. Powerfully dressing herself younger so her rebellion looked more excusable to outsiders, and her constant seeking of parental approval, are both markers of the nuance and depth of Annie’s character that Landman has imagined in her novella. Written for a reading age of nine, but with teen content, this is another example of a strong inspirational woman fighting for survival and recognition, and beautifully conjures the landscape and political reality of America at that time. Landman cleverly incorporates Annie’s bravery into her fight to do what feels natural, even though it is classed as unladylike, and also showing her courage in admitting her abuse to her future husband. The chapter in which she steps into the shooting competition with Frank Wilkes made me want to sing again. I’m hoping Landman will bring her own targeted eye to writing the next part of Annie’s life. You can buy it here. 

ariane grandeUltimate Superstars: Ariana Grande by Liz Gogerly
Hot on the footsteps of the wildly successful Ultimate Football Heroes, comes this new series on ‘superstars’, a loose concept, but so far comprising Beyoncé and Ariana Grande. It doesn’t matter how famous a person is for these biographies, it’s the journey to get there or the quirkier achievements that make for a decent life story.

The focus for Ariana Grande is, of course, the bombing at her Manchester Arena concert in 2017, and this is where this life story starts and ends, and is dealt with sensitively, making much of the fans, and also her shock at the time and sympathetic nature afterwards. Grande’s life story has been one of success after success from early days as part of the cast of 13, a ground-breaking all-teenage production on the Broadway stage, to Victorious on Nickelodeon, and then onward to her music career, including performing in front of President Obama at the age of 21.

Success may have heralded success, but the book documents Grande’s tough skin, her hard work and determination, her efforts and affinity with fans through social media, and her supportive family, including her much-loved grandfather. For fans, a must. For others, I’m generally of the opinion that a subject needs to be slightly older to have a truly interesting biography. Taylor Swift and Selena Gomez publications follow in May. You can buy it here. 

gloria's voiceGloria’s Voice by Aura Lewis
A good premise to showcase the influence and achievements of feminist Gloria Steinmen needs more explanation in this picture book for a young audience. Illustrated in throw-back 1970’s oranges and pinks, the text is simplistic and yet in some places rather cryptic – simplistic in the language used that explains how Gloria dreams of being famous, yet cryptic in that it fails to explain the name or influence of her magazine ‘Ms’. However, it does explore the aims of the Women’s Liberation Movement, and it does draw attention to global inequalities that Steinmen witnessed then, and that persist now. So this is an interesting biographical text that may stimulate further curiosity. Watercolour illustrations range from the fantastical to the strange in showing Steinmen playing unhappily with a dolls’ house, representing her care-taking role in her mother’s illness, to a rather strange portrait of Steinmen flying ‘a la Wonder Woman’ above a suburban neighbourhood. Extra information at the end gives some context, but really the text needs more explanation from the beginning so that young readers understand why Gloria was so influential. You can buy it here. 

The Light in the Night Giveaway

light in the night
A few weeks ago I reviewed The Light in the Night by Marie Voigt, a new picturebook about overcoming fear of the dark, and helping others. It explores the notion that bravery can only be found if one confronts one’s fears – that reward comes from adventure.

Marie Voigt’s aim with her picture book is to inspire and delight, to have a small impact on making the world a little bit brighter and happier. And this book does exactly that.

You can read the full review here. It’s a very special book, winning over the reader with its adorable cuddly illustrations. Although I’d love to give away replica cuddly bears, all I can offer is books!

To celebrate this very special picture book, I have three hardback copies of the book to give away, thanks to Simon and Schuster publishers. To win one of these, simply find @minervamoan on Twitter and retweet the Light in the Night blogtour tweet from today to win.

Be My Valentine

I’ve taken the liberty of focussing on love in general for my picture books on Valentine’s Day. That’s not to say I eschew romance – not at all! But working as a primary school librarian, Valentines are more likely passed from friend to friend or child to family member or even to pet, and this is what these three picture books celebrate.

the kissThe Kiss by Linda Sunderland, illustrated by Jessica Courtney-Tickle

In the so-called current trend for uplit (literature that’s uplifting for the soul), this picture book fits lovingly into the zeitgeist. Edwyn blows a kiss to his grandma, shown on the cover as a gold foil sprinkle of stars, like dandelion seeds released into the wind. Edwyn’s grandma shares her received kiss, almost as an act of kindness, bestowing it upon those who need it most, such as a sad old man and a cross mother. But then darkness descends in the shape of a man who steals it and wants to keep the kiss for himself, all locked up as an artefact in a cage. But this has devastating consequences for the kiss, for him, and also for the outside world. Luckily, he not only sees the error of his ways, but is granted swift forgiveness by the kind grandma, and all is resolved.

Courtney-Tickle illustrates the story with an emphasis on nature and the outdoors. Most of her large double page illustrations are populated with wildflowers, colourful leaves, animals and outdoor activities with a clear focus on weather – all emphasised by the choice of dancing leaves on the book’s endpapers. The colour is magical, reminiscent of David Litchfield, with an old-fashioned fairy tale quality, exemplified by marching bands, an abundance of Snow-White-esque wildlife, cold dark towers, a simplicity in the characters’ timeless outfits. And yet a modernity creeps in too – a wooden bin at the park, mobile phones, an abundance of balloons.

The book is about love shared, kindnesses spread, and the empathy needed to understand others. You can buy it here. 

mirabel's missing valentinesMirabel’s Missing Valentines by Janet Lawler, illustrated by Olivia Chin Mueller

More love shared in this whimsical picture book from the States, which really is about Valentine’s Day.

Mirabel, our shy and anxiety-ridden mouse, complete with large eyes, long whiskers and a penchant for hats, sets out for school to deliver her Valentine’s cards.

The reader is entreated to rhyming text to tell Mirabel’s story – the joy at creating the cards and the angst about delivering them – but it is only through ‘reading’ the pictures that we see the cards spill from her bag on her way to school. The recipients of the spilled cards (all strangers in the town) return them with smiles, touched by their heartfelt sincerity and the fleeting opportunity to see them, which makes them smile and gives them joy. The happiness she has inadvertently spread gives Mirabel the confidence to take them to school.

The illustrations are old-worldly, a cast of anthropomorphic animals fill the book, the buildings look as if they come from a playmobil playset. But if you’re after a picturebook about overcoming anxiety and shyness, and how kindness can spread, this may be one for you. Endearing. You can buy it here. 

rosie is my best friendRosie is My Best Friend by Ali Pye

A much more modern outlook in this fresh and zippy tale of friendship that relies heavily upon the reader’s visual understanding as well as narrative absorption. Rosie explores how she spends her day with her best friend – helping the adults around them, playing games, learning new tricks. There’s a delightful contradiction between the helpfulness Rosie and her friend think they are giving, and the actual consequence of some of their actions, and the illustrations not only reveal the truth but burst with friendliness, vibrancy and warmth themselves, from the stroll in the park with balloon seller, boating and games, to the make-believe play at home.

There is familiarity in this tale of an ‘everyday’, a comfort from the openness of the characters and the intense cuteness of both girl and dog. The twist at the end is both writerly and masterful – suggesting the reader thinks about point of view and perspective. Clever, witty, and completely adorable. Give it to your Valentine for Valentine’s here.