science

Oceans

ocean secrets of the deepToday is Earth Day. When we look at the Earth from space, it’s mainly blue. The oceans cover more than 70 per cent of our planet. Three sensational books take the reader up close and down into the depths of our fabulous oceans. Firstly, Oceans: Secrets of the Deep by Sabrina Weiss and Giulia De Amicis takes a comprehensive look at this largest habitat on Earth, from amazing creatures to the different zones in the sea: Twilight, Midnight, Hadal, the Abyss! And then it explores different ecosystems within, from kelp forests to coral reefs, before delving into surprising facts and creature information – the sounds of the ocean, journeys and migration, and lastly of course, how we can protect this marvellous environment.

Filled with colourful, stark illustrations and infographics, printed on high-quality paper, the book exudes a sheen.

Author Sabrina Weiss works for the British Ecological Society and the Marine Megafauna Foundation, and below she talks about her work protecting endangered ocean giants such as whale sharks and manta rays.

How much do we really know about the ocean?

By Sabrina Weiss

Mornings in Praia do Tofo usually started with a cup of coffee on our veranda watching the waves lap on the shore. Hoping to escape the hectic city life for a while and donate our professional expertise to a good cause, Giulia De Amicis and I had found ourselves sharing a thatched house in this remote fishing village in southern Mozambique while volunteering for a charity that aims to study and protect threatened sharks and rays.

View from the Marine Megafauna Foundation office, the charity Sabrina and Giulia worked for in Tofo © Sabrina Weiss

We have long been lovers of the ocean and avid scuba divers, and so here we were, sipping our freshly-brewed coffees and recounting our incredible encounters from the day before. As we were hovering midwater during our final dive, I had pointed to three manta rays which were slowly approaching the reef below us. Mantas are often observed around the ‘cleaning stations’ on these bustling coral reefs, where they have their wounds tended by small fish. By doing this the mantas stay clean and healthy and the cleaners get a free meal.

We couldn’t believe our luck. We had been reading and hearing lots about these elusive animals and had worked together on infographics and posters to share our love and fascination with the rest of the world and, yet, only now did we get to see them with our own eyes. These gentle giants, which can reach a ‘finspan’ of seven metres, are very curious and may even swim towards divers to inspect them before vanishing into the big blue.

Giant manta ray feeding near the surface, Tofo © Sabrina Weiss

Even more astonishing is that no one has seen a manta ray give birth in the wild. Ever. It is thought that pregnant females may be seeking out pupping grounds along this beautiful coastline, possibly not far from Tofo. They may be giving birth right under our noses. There is still so much to learn about the secret lives of mantas.

Giulia returned to Milan the following day, but it wasn’t a final goodbye; it was the beginning of a new friendship and an exciting book project that allowed us to tell the fascinating stories of our beautiful and mysterious ocean-dwelling friends.  

With thanks to Sabrina Weiss. Ocean: Secrets of the Deep by Sabrina Weiss, illustrated by Giulia De Amicis is available now at £14.99, published by What on Earth Books, and you can buy it here

beneath the wavesOther budding ocean enthusiasts and environmentalists will be keen to explore Helen Ahpornsiri’s Beneath the Waves: A Journey Through the World’s Oceans, text by Lily Murray. This book is something quite special – each of Ahpornsiri’s illustrations are made using real flora and foliage, which has been preserved using traditional flower pressing methods before she combines the individual pieces into a collage.

The plants are organised by species or colour before being cut out and arranged to form the patterns and colours of plant life and the animals that dwell within. Much use is made of seaweed – fronds of purple laver creating the image of a whale shark, for example.

The book is arranged into four distinct parts: coast, open ocean, tropics and polar waters, and each section explores the flora and fauna within, giving concise information. The illustrations are really quite extraordinary – the seahorse is rendered with a combination of tiny green flowers, light pink ferny leaves, and some darker pinkish brown flora to create an animated, almost fiery, expressive animal.

A simple glossary at the back gives further information. This is a stunning book that holds a gentleness and will provoke a tender wonder at the natural world.

Look closely here.

ocean helene druvertOcean by Helene Druvert, text by Emmanuelle Grundmann also plays with the reader’s expectations, this time with paper-cuts. Using laser cuts and paper folding, the book has fun conveying information in a smart way with careful paper engineering.

The depths of the oceans are shown using wavy paper cutting, the tide spread uses a large side flap to represent the tide coming in or out, the pebbles are flaps uncovering information on the sea floor, information about waves is given using a wave laser cut to look reminiscent of the famous illustration by Hokusai, the coral reef is stunningly colourful, and the food chain hidden beneath a super predator.

This is a really tactile large-format reference book, with good basic information from the water cycle to the polar regions. Explore the depths here

Look out later this week for my Earth Day Earth books!

 

 

April Showers

home in the rainHome in the Rain by Bob Graham
Turning the everyday into something extraordinary, Graham is the master of embracing a child’s view of the world. This wonderful little tale follows Francie and her mum as they drive home in torrential rain from Grandma’s house. The illustrations loop in and out of the car, as the reader sees the small red car jammed between lorries and oil-tankers on the highway, before zooming into the backseat with Francie, and then out into the countryside tucked away beyond the road, with the wildlife sheltering from the wet, and up into the air as a kestrel dives.

Graham explores the sights, sounds and smells of the everyday – from an argument at an interchange, to the smell of farmyards, the squeaky sound as Francie writes on the steamed up car window, rainbow oil puddles, the noise of the radio, and finally into Francie’s imagination as she wonders what her new baby sister will be named when she’s born.

The observational perspectives of the book pick out what’s familiar and what’s new, just like the coming of a new baby. It’s an atmospheric book, empathetic, and both words and pictures express a softness that feels soothing – an ‘everything’s going to be alright’ tone. You can buy it here. 

rhythm of the rainThe Rhythm of the Rain by Grahame Baker-Smith
A book that takes an image of a small boy playing in his favourite pool on the mountainside, opens up to huge scope as it portrays Earth’s water cycle.

Isaac sees clouds dark above him, the rain pours down into the pool creating streams that flow into the river near his house (beautifully cast on stilts). The book then follows the river into the sea.

It is the ambition of the book that is so impressive. Baker-Smith conveys the cycle of water of course, explaining the ocean steaming into mist, but the magic lies within the water’s journey. He conveys how water adds to the environment, how humans, animals and vegetation interact with it across the globe and throughout time. Water is important and transient, both gentle and powerful. He shows the different ways in which water presents – its stillness in a jar of water, plunging waterfalls, laughing streams, meandering rivers, churning waves. Water is commodity, yet nature, utilitarian resource, yet something to be protected. Pure and simple in its magnitude.

And all the while referring back to Isaac. Each page is an illustrative work of art, and the words ebb and flow like poetry. The use of light in the artworks is extraordinary – Isaac’s reflection in the water as he stands in the natural pool is haunting and wondrous. Not to be missed. Buy your copy here. 

once upon a raindropOnce Upon a Raindrop by James Carter, illustrated by Nomoco
This too is the story of water, but so utterly different in style. Nomoco’s abstract watercolour feels almost like the different types of water itself – sometimes looping down the pages in the form of water-carrying pipes, at others winding its way across the page like a river. There are droplets too – inkstains in circles across a page – and always accompanied by Carter’s poetry as he explores the facts of the matter in lyrics.

Starting with the beginning of time, Carter tracks water on meteors that carry ice, all the way through to water’s uses today – keeping humans clean and healthy – as well as life’s overwhelming necessity for water.

Because each page is so different from the next, both in form of poem and execution of illustration, it allows the reader to dissect the different formations of water and the different elements to it. Modern, fresh and impactful, this makes for a refreshing imbibing of information. Get wet here.

When the Stars Come out by Nicola Edwards, illustrated by Lucy Cartwright

when the stars come outWhenever there’s a new topic at school, there’s a scramble from teachers and some pupils to find the library books that fit, the book that’s pitched correctly for the age group and touches on all the themes that the teacher wants to explore during that term. And rarely does a book match exactly. Probably because then it would be a textbook, rather than a book for exploring, a book for further stimulus and enquiry. When the Stars Come Out by Nicola Edwards, illustrated by Lucy Cartwright, is a refreshing piece of nonfiction that not only ticks the boxes when exploring ‘Time and Place, Earth and Space’ for example, but it also neatly stretches the mind, and causes pause for thought, and elicits pleasure at the same time.

Not just a space book, as the title might imply, When the Stars Come Out intends to explore our whole universe at night-time from the sciencey bits, such as why night occurs and the different constellations in the sky, but also the geographical element – both physical and human – and it also reaches right from the outer echelons of the universe into our very heads; what happens when we sleep?

Diagrams and illustrations begin the story of how the night works, showing the rotation of the Earth in relation to the sun. Then, before the constellations are explored, there’s some history on stargazing, and some recognition of why some people are scared of the dark. The moon and stars are investigated, and then tangents of this, including auroras, moonbows and shooting stars.

Coming down to earth, Edwards explores different landscapes at night, from the city to the desert, rainforests, mountains and many more including the sea, extrapolating which changes happen at night in the darkness. Animals are looked at in more detail in the next chapter, looking at sleep, dreams, nocturnal animals, and of course, humans. This chapter is particularly interesting as it’s rarely dealt with in children’s non-fiction. I liked the pie chart of sleep cycles, our natural rhythms, and then a look at super sleepers and world records, including the man who stayed awake for 11 days. It’s dangerous of course, as explained in the text, but fascinating information.

Lastly, the book investigates extreme days and nights – near the Arctic and Antarctic Circles, as well as clever inventions such as glow in the dark cement and what scientists are working on in terms of night-time and day-time differences in plant growth, for example. The book ends with a glorious celebration of the night – from Diwali to Walpurgisnacht.

This is a joyous and fascinating book. The illustrations are detailed and immersive – both conveying the science in the lunar cycle, but also a sense of wonder and mystery in dreams and night visitors. My only caveat is the size of the text against darkish backgrounds – not good for sleepy eyes – but perhaps the text’s smallness will keep the mind focussed and prevent daydreaming!

The book is large in size but well designed to reflect the information inside. The mountains spread reads as portrait rather than landscape – mirroring mountains of course, but also giving the different levels of mountainous terrain – the birds, the climbers, the foothills. Other pages look like landscapes – the savannah for example, with its panel of night sky at the top, but then it’s land mass stretching towards the reader. The animals are illustrated in action – grazing or in motion, but the text is chunked nicely into individual paragraphs, many in their own colourful panels. The book is extremely visual – the colours subtle rather than garish, reflecting the muted light of night times.

An exciting non-fiction title that illuminates the mysteries of our night-time and stimulates curious minds across a broad spectrum of inter-linking subjects. You can buy it here.

British Science Week

It’s British Science Week, 8th to 17th March, and it’s delightful to see hands-on experimenting happening at school and at home. We are growing crystals in the kitchen, and dropping eggs in school, and I’m thankful that the experimenting is that way around.

science is magicFor other science experiments, a new book is making life very easy. Science is Magic by Steve Mould is a science experiment book that uses everyday items. I don’t think there was a single item in the book that I needed to go out and purchase. Examples include a can of drink, a pack of cards, a measuring jug. Each experiment is fun and simple, and then leads onto explaining the science behind it.

We looked at the ‘pepper-repelling finger’ and learned about surface tension, experimented with ‘colour-changing potions’ and learned about the amount of acid in liquids, and made ‘a drinks can jump’ whilst learning about forces.

The reason it’s called magic – is because it aims to show things that appear to be magic, but can actually be explained by science. The tricks or experiments are easy to follow, but there are also pages on natural wonders that seem like magic, but can be explained, such as camouflage, erosion, and bio-luminescence. What’s more, there’s history too as Mould explains how certain tricks were performed in the past – how illusionist David Copperfield made the Statue of Liberty disappear in 1983, and many more.

The layout is  easy to follow with large pictures and typeface, not many of the experiments appear in previous science experiment books, and there’s a good glossary at the end. Experiment here.

gaming technologyFor the more tech-minded child during Science Week, there’s the STEM in our World series, and in particular Gaming Technology: Streaming, VR and More by John Wood and Kirsty Holmes. With lovely clear writing, Wood and Holmes explain, through the narrator called Tess Tube, why STEM is important – “it’s all about understanding and solving problems in the real world.”

Gaming is a big part of the leisure industry and the book takes the reader through the history, accessible gaming for those with disabilities, and how the industry has advanced, with techniques from motion capture to VR and streaming. The book also suggests how gaming can be more than just leisure – helping to keep humans healthy and fit, and outlines ‘citizen science’ – exploring how games can help research into diseases, genetics and the environment, using examples such as ‘eyewire’ to explain how. Whale FM is another, in which players listen to clips of whale-song and match to other clips that sound the same. Players are helping scientists.

Of course books illuminating such up-to-the-minute technology will date, but for the moment this is a great nonfiction book for kids that guides learning and discussion on the topic. Designed for KS2 Science (aged 7-11), the layout is coherent and colourful – a good balance of large text and pictures; photographic, diagrammatic, and illustrative. Go gaming here.

pop-up moonStaying with physics, but branching also into astronomy, is Pop-Up Moon by Anne Jankeliowitch, Olivier Charbonnel and Annabelle Buxton. This is a real feat of paper engineering, with pop-ups on every other page, which fold back down easily after many openings of the book, and aren’t so flimsy that the reader would be scared to touch. What’s more, each pop-up really works its science. The first is a graphic representation of the position of the Earth and Moon in relation to the Sun, and shows the phases over a month. This leads into a spread about the tides and some urban myths about the power of the moon. The next pop-up is the planets in orbit, cleverly done so that it stands up beautifully when the book is open. There is some good physics disseminated in later pages about light and shadow, and space exploration. Inspirational and informative, this is a good science book for Earth and Space topics. Fly to the moon here.

International Women’s Day 2019

I’m a keen viewer of University Challenge on the BBC, a quiz show for students. Recently, I’ve noticed more and more questions creep in that refer to women in history, previously unnoticed women composers and artists, those whom the layperson in the street definitely couldn’t identify. I admit, I don’t know enough about women in history either, and my shouting ‘Beethoven’ in answer to most questions just doesn’t cut it! Luckily, on this International Women’s Day, children’s publishers are waking up to these lesser-known important historical figures too. And so today’s collection is a definite celebration of women – from famous sisters in history, to lesser-known scientists and pioneers, to modern celebrity women pushing boundaries.

the bluest of bluesThe Bluest of Blues: Anna Atkins and the First Book of Photographs by Fiona Robinson
This extraordinarily exquisite picture book is a biography of British botanist and photographer, Anna Atkins, who lived 1799 to 1871, and used the newly-invented technology of cyanotype photography to record her catalogue of plant specimens.

What could be quite a dry biography is manipulated into an aesthetically intimate and touching portrayal of Anna, her enthusiasm and love for her craft – and a meshing of science and art, creativity hand-in-hand with discovery.

The book is cast in an illustrative shade of blue, mimicking the cyanotype’s blue and white tones – with Robinson cleverly incorporating the odd splash of red or yellow to emphasise inspiration – the first poppy Atkins examines, the roses in her marriage bouquet, the red ribbon round the gift of her first camera.

The book explores her life and works, and also the support from those around her, particularly her father, who educated his daughter in science, despite it being unusual at that time. This is good narrative non-fiction, delineating the scientific concepts of photography and botany, whilst remaining true to telling Atkins’ life. You can buy it here. 

the brontesThe Brontes by Anna Doherty
Another picture book that frames the world of important women in a single hue, this time a turquoise minty green. Of course, these sisters are well-known to many, but may be accessed for the first time by readers of this picture book, as it is squarely aimed at a young audience. Illustrations dominate the pages, as Doherty documents the girls’ life story from their childhood through to publication, illness and death.

A family tree starts the book, and individual profiles of the sisters and Branwell come near the end. The story is inflected with the author’s own perspective, clearly infused with feminist undertones as she explains how the sisters first published under male pseydonyms. The text is simplistic but clear, and the author takes the opportunity at the end of the book to articulate further social history, exploring why the Brontes were so fantastically feminist.

The book is marvellously attractive, speaking not only to the power of women, but to the power of imagination and story. An inspirational book that makes the world of the Brontes feel intimate, and fascinating. First in a series. Other titles include Ada Lovelace and Michelle Obama. You can buy it here. 

grace hopperGrace Hopper: Queen of Computer Code by Laurie Wallmark, illustrated by Katy Wu
With a rhyming poem on the endpapers introducing the scope of this lively picture book for youngsters, ‘Software tester. Workplace jester. Order seeker. Well-known speaker…’ the reader is immediately engrossed in this enthusiastic exploration of how Grace Hopper discovered computer code and became a trailblazing STEM advocate. What’s intriguing about this book is that it highlights that women’s involvement in computers and tech isn’t a recent phenomena  – Hopper was engaged from the beginning – she was a pioneer.

Hopper developed a ground-breaking way of writing computer code, as much from her understanding of how things work, numbers and logic, as from her intuition and creativity. The book carries that perpetually important message of determination and perseverance, especially in the face of adversity, and ends on a high hopeful note.

The full-colour, almost cartoonish illustrations provide an insight into the zest and energy that powered Hopper, from showing her as a frustrated but determined and curious little girl, to a hardworking, brave and intrepid Navy employee. Her insatiable curiosity and her ability to step away from code to find the answers in life as well, show her as a fully rounded, identifiable human. This is an informative and aspirational picture book – you’d do very well to show this to your sons and daughters. You can buy it here. 

one shotOne Shot by Tanya Landman
Ever since my parents took me to see Annie Get Your Gun in the West End as a child, I’ve had a thing about Annie Oakley. With numbers like ‘There’s No Business Like Show Business’, and ‘Anything You Can Do, I Can Do Better’, who wouldn’t be inspired by this trailblazing feminist? Landman’s novella on Annie Oakley’s childhood, One Shot, (which is completely fictionalised) is just as powerful and poignant, although in a very different way. Set in the later part of the 19th century, this sometimes disturbing, haunting book imagines Annie’s harsh upbringing – the death of her beloved father, her rejection by her mother, and her abusive treatment by adoptive parents (there are references to rape).

But mainly this is a compelling historical visualisation of the social normalities that Annie had to fight in order to prove her worth as a sharpshooter, to rebel against the constrictions imposed on her because of her gender. Powerfully dressing herself younger so her rebellion looked more excusable to outsiders, and her constant seeking of parental approval, are both markers of the nuance and depth of Annie’s character that Landman has imagined in her novella. Written for a reading age of nine, but with teen content, this is another example of a strong inspirational woman fighting for survival and recognition, and beautifully conjures the landscape and political reality of America at that time. Landman cleverly incorporates Annie’s bravery into her fight to do what feels natural, even though it is classed as unladylike, and also showing her courage in admitting her abuse to her future husband. The chapter in which she steps into the shooting competition with Frank Wilkes made me want to sing again. I’m hoping Landman will bring her own targeted eye to writing the next part of Annie’s life. You can buy it here. 

ariane grandeUltimate Superstars: Ariana Grande by Liz Gogerly
Hot on the footsteps of the wildly successful Ultimate Football Heroes, comes this new series on ‘superstars’, a loose concept, but so far comprising Beyoncé and Ariana Grande. It doesn’t matter how famous a person is for these biographies, it’s the journey to get there or the quirkier achievements that make for a decent life story.

The focus for Ariana Grande is, of course, the bombing at her Manchester Arena concert in 2017, and this is where this life story starts and ends, and is dealt with sensitively, making much of the fans, and also her shock at the time and sympathetic nature afterwards. Grande’s life story has been one of success after success from early days as part of the cast of 13, a ground-breaking all-teenage production on the Broadway stage, to Victorious on Nickelodeon, and then onward to her music career, including performing in front of President Obama at the age of 21.

Success may have heralded success, but the book documents Grande’s tough skin, her hard work and determination, her efforts and affinity with fans through social media, and her supportive family, including her much-loved grandfather. For fans, a must. For others, I’m generally of the opinion that a subject needs to be slightly older to have a truly interesting biography. Taylor Swift and Selena Gomez publications follow in May. You can buy it here. 

gloria's voiceGloria’s Voice by Aura Lewis
A good premise to showcase the influence and achievements of feminist Gloria Steinmen needs more explanation in this picture book for a young audience. Illustrated in throw-back 1970’s oranges and pinks, the text is simplistic and yet in some places rather cryptic – simplistic in the language used that explains how Gloria dreams of being famous, yet cryptic in that it fails to explain the name or influence of her magazine ‘Ms’. However, it does explore the aims of the Women’s Liberation Movement, and it does draw attention to global inequalities that Steinmen witnessed then, and that persist now. So this is an interesting biographical text that may stimulate further curiosity. Watercolour illustrations range from the fantastical to the strange in showing Steinmen playing unhappily with a dolls’ house, representing her care-taking role in her mother’s illness, to a rather strange portrait of Steinmen flying ‘a la Wonder Woman’ above a suburban neighbourhood. Extra information at the end gives some context, but really the text needs more explanation from the beginning so that young readers understand why Gloria was so influential. You can buy it here. 

Skycircus by Peter Bunzl (Book Three of the Cogheart Series)

skycircusWhen I was reading Skycircus, I couldn’t help but think of The Greatest Showman. The success of that film wasn’t down to critics, who panned the movie on its opening weekend, and I went to see it (somewhat reluctantly and with low expectations) with the children, and now own both the DVD and the soundtrack and secretly play them when the children are at school. Is it the music, or is it perhaps the emotions that circuses inspire that proved it such a great success?

The Greatest Showman is based very loosely upon PT Barnum, remembered for his travelling circus. Ironically the film sets out to show acceptance of difference, despite Barnum being known for his exploitation and sometime racism.

Circuses have long been a source of inspiration and imagination for novelists. Many children’s book characters visit the circus at least once in their series – Pippi Longstocking, Madeline, Doctor Doolittle, Claude, Paddington Bear all went to the circus, and some of my favourite stand-alone literature is set in the circus – The Girl Who Walked on Air by Emma Carroll, Circus Shoes by Noel Streatfield.

The circus arena is a great site for storytelling. As with theatre there’s the theme of appearance and reality, what’s hidden behind masks and costumes, but the circus also brings a daredevil nature to the stage – acts that seem impossible, daring and courage, excitement and danger. And an inherent subversive nature. Whether it’s the people behind the circus – seen for such a long time as ‘other’ – or the arguments over mistreatment of animals in the arena, the dichotomy of both providing entertainment but also making money, and the long history and argument of exploitative acts versus acts celebrating freedoms.

Peter Bunzl had already incorporated elements of this into his Victoriana steampunk series that  begins with Cogheart, an adventure story that subverts history and science, featuring mechanimals, penny dreadfuls, clocks and cogs, the author supposing that mechanicals were more advanced than they really were – that humans had reached a scientific equivalent to robots and AI but without computing leading the way – instead using mechanical parts.

Skycircus, the third in Bunzl’s Cogheart series, transports the characters from Cogheart – Lily, her mechanimal fox Malkin and her human friend Robert into a circus adventure. With the energy and tone of the prior books, it adds to the atmosphere a circus in which the people are treated more as prisoners, and circus acts that fuse the mechanical with the derring-do of trapeze acts and escape artists.

On Lily’s fourteenth birthday, she receives a cryptic poem inviting her to a travelling skycircus, arrived in the locale. Not being able to resist the clues, she sets off to watch the acts, little failing to realise that it’s a trap and that before long she’ll no longer be the observer in the audience, but the headline act herself.

With references to the past books, and Lily’s own past creeping forwards to haunt her, the book works both as a stand-alone read but also a continuation of the series. Never shy with words, the book is meaty and dense – an imagined world full of science and steampunk and its accompanying vocabulary.

With a keen nod to today’s preoccupations of gender stereotyping (a plot twist for which I fell cog, sprocket and gear), and liberally littered with allusions to Ada Lovelace, Charles Babbage and the leading thinkers of the time in which it’s set, this is a layered book with much to extrapolate. Of course, there’s much about exploitation, and of animals too, but mainly about how we see others who may seem different from us; whether it’s a seen physical manifestation (perhaps race or a disability), or whether its just about seeing things from another’s point of view. Whom do you trust and how far can science take us?

Despite all this, at its heart this is a thrilling, danger-filled adventure story. I particularly enjoy Bunzl’s small touches of humour and detail that imbue each story with depth of character and charm. The clown who speaks in spoonerisms in Skycircus, the magnificent understanding of the rolling out of the circus, and the allusions to ancient myths and the power of storytelling itself.

This is a grand book with a plot as tense as tiptoeing the tightrope, and bold narration that shouts as loudly as the red and white stripes of the circus tent. You can run away to your own circus here.

Up and Away: The Skies

How often do we look up to the skies? More and more we stretch our necks downwards to look at our phones and fail to take in what’s at eye level. But even rarer is for us to look skywards. These five wonderful non-fiction titles, and one picturebook for children, explore the world above our heads – both in the day, and at night-time.

the skies above my eyesThe Skies Above My Eyes by Charlotte Guillain, illustrated by Yuval Zommer

A follow up title to the hugely popular The Street Beneath My Feet, this is a book that unfolds concertina style to explore the expanse of space above our heads. Very beautifully, the two sides follow different paths: one is countryside/rural-based in that a girl is seen lying on her back staring up through the trees, and looking at migrating birds, spiders ballooning, cloud formations and up to the Solar System past the Northern Lights. On the converse side, which is technologically-based, the girl is seen staring up past skyscrapers, to helicopters, aeroplanes, weather balloons and space rockets into the Solar System. With measurements given along the chart, and information about the atmosphere, history and physics, this is a fascinating guide to the skies above us, and all that they contain.

The book folds out to a whopping 2.5 metres tall – I cannot hold it up fully when standing, but laid out along a school corridor or a living room, this is a wonderful way to explore non-fiction. Zommer’s illustrations lend themselves both to the factual element – his rocket is intricate and cleverly shadowed, but also to the whimsical, with a floating umbrella Mary Poppins style. A well-designed, intriguing collaboration – this is exactly how to fascinate children with the world around us. You can buy it here.

cat's guide to the night skyA Cat’s Guide to the Night Sky by Stuart Atkinson, illustrations by Brendan Kearney

A more traditional guide to astronomy and the night sky in this well-designed and attractive non-fiction book. Atkinson’s long experience of writing about space and astronomy is apparent in the way that he distils tricky ideas into simple sentences, exploring in a down-to-earth way how to star gaze. Beginning with keeping safe outdoors, the book (and its guide Felicity the Cat) takes the reader through the different seasons – the best time of year to view particular constellations and what the reader should be looking for, with explanation about the makeup of stars, the phases of the Moon, the Northern Lights and much more. Atkinson is matter-of-fact about what the constellations really look like, and how to try to view a planet, but Felicity the Cat adds nice philosophical touches, such as wondering if anyone is looking back at her too.

The graphics are excellent, both the phases of the Moon and the constellations well-delineated, and there’s a feeling of immense friendliness and warmth in the domestic images of garden viewing platforms, as well as added humour with Felicity, who dresses according to the season. Includes a glossary and index. Age 7+ You can buy it here.

 

starry skiesStarry Skies by Samantha Chagollan and Nila Aye

For younger children interested in the shapes and patterns made by the stars, this is an elegant and beautiful tactile little hardback with stiff board pages. A die-cut on the cover with an uncomplicated yellow star and a teddy bear with stars for eyes showcases the target age group and the simplicity of the graphics within. The author explains that the positions of the stars tell a story, and each double spread includes a constellation with an imaginative narrative sentence alongside: Ursa Major and minor are seen when ‘Sophia’ and her mom [sic] take a forest path, Pegasus is shown alongside ‘Leah’ on horseback ready to spread her wings and fly. The two-colour scheme of yellow and black works well to really illuminate the constellations, and the book is hardy and practical for taking outside. Age 4+ Stargaze here.

 

 

 

voyage through spaceVoyage Through Space by Katy Flint, illustrated by Cornelia Li

Appealing on another level with a glow-in-the-dark fold out poster of the solar system (nicely attached and easily detached to the book with a perforated edge), is this straightforward but rather cartoonishly illustrated information book about the solar system. Each planet is afforded a double spread – with lovely illustrations of a young female astronaut and her dog peering at each planet. A glare is carefully shaded onto her mask, and she wears glasses near the sun – our courageous astronaut is seen landing on the Moon and optimistically Mars – other illustrations are even more supposed, such as when she views the asteroid belt sitting upon one of the orbiting rocks. But the text is fact-based – explaining definitions, measurements and scientists’ hypotheses.

The colour palette is particularly alluring – Neptune is cast in almost phosphorescent blue, Saturn a golden glow, Mars a rusty brown-red. Captions and annotations help to explore the full-page images, and although short, this is a great introduction to the solar system for intrepid space explorers. Age 5+. You can buy it here.

 

planetariumWelcome to the Museum: Planetarium by Chris Wormell and Raman Prinja

Planetarium is the latest in the Welcome to the Museum series, this time in conjunction with the Science Museum. Wormell’s last collaboration in this series was on Dinosaurium, whose lavishly illustrated creatures set a high bench mark for illustrated non-fiction. This tome, exploring the Solar System, is no less delightful or comprehensive, and maintains the sophisticated authoritative tone of the rest of the series.

Written by Raman Prinja, a Professor of Astrophysics at UCL, the book aims to go further than many space information books for children, starting with an explanation of radiation and light and traversing through the history of astronomy before navigating the Solar System, star life cycles and black holes. The end of the book takes in the incomprehensibility of huge superclusters and Universe expansion.

To accompany these mind-bogging theories, facts and wonders, Wormell’s power of intricate and detailed illustration has been utilised to its full extent. The detailed drawings of telescopes are like dioramas on the page, his intricate etchings of solar flares and coronal loops feel almost three-dimensional in their depiction. This is not an easy book – there is science galore and difficult concepts, but there is a handsome clarity to the text and a sense of wonder that imbues the science behind the illustrations. There’s also some wonderful prose writing:

“They [black holes] can’t be seen, but if a human got too close to one, they would be sucked in by its gravitational pull, stretched out like spaghetti and incinerated in a wall of fire!”

For space fans and astronomy maestros this is one outsized book they’ll yearn to devour. 8+ years and beyond. Explore the museum here.

the space trainThe Space Train by Maudie-Powell Tuck, illustrated by Karl James Mountford

I’ve added a picture book to my ‘skies’ blogpost because often the information and facts we absorb on a topic lead us to daydream about our own or others’ adventures in that area. And because quite often, even though a children’s ‘knowledge’ topic at school may revolve around learning facts, they will often spark off into a piece of creative writing, and this picture book ticks all the boxes in providing educational content, inspiration, imagination and energy. The Space Train is a wonderful lift-the-flap adventure about a boy and his grandma in the future and their attempts to rebuild the space train – a vehicle that propels through space faster than a rocket.

Not only is this a fun and cheeky adventure, but it is richly illustrated with a bold colour palette and a super eye for detail. There are hidden flaps and holes to peek through, and a thrilling mind-whirling combination of ‘sciencey’ words, make-believe and the power of grit and determination, as well as a wonderful relationship between grandparent and child. When Jakob and Granny attempt to fix the old space train, they have to put together the thrusters and combustion chamber by riveting and welding. But there’s intergalactic imagination too – with a Toolbot, a robot chicken, an intergalactic buffet car, an observation deck and much much more. This is an imagined future universe of fun and adventure, but complete with a modern, energetic engineer Granny and brilliantly drawn full page illustrations of what it might be like to live in a future space station. Let your imagination soar here.

World Science Day

Saturday 10th November is World Science Day. But every day is science day in our house. Whether we’re working out how much baking powder will make the cake rise, to calculating our speed at running up the steep inclines near the house, to gathering different types of fallen leaves outside the front door. Because, for children, science doesn’t necessarily slot neatly into a named discipline, but fits into everything they do, everywhere they go. In the same way that these books aren’t chemistry or physics text books, but a wonderful mix of non-fiction picture books, non-fiction narrative, fiction etc; and they introduce science into children’s lives in a range of different ways.

Max EinsteinMax Einstein: The Genius Experiment by James Patterson and Chris Grabenstein, illustrated by Beverly Johnson

“Never cease to stand like curious children before the Great Mystery into which we were born.”

This bouncy fiction title from best-selling American author James Patterson is a typical adventure story, but it oozes science and is all the more winning for doing so. Twelve-year-old orphan Max lives above stables in New York City, and is obsessed with Albert Einstein. She’s a bit of a genius herself, fabricating records to get a place at NYU. Then one day, she’s recruited by a mysterious organisation, taken to a gathering of the world’s other child prodigies in Israel, and asked to take part in a competition to lead world-saving projects. With teamwork and creativity, Max overcomes various obstacles, and nasty ‘oligarch’ baddies to win the day, providing globally conscious, humanitarian solutions to various scientific problems.

The setting of part of the book in Israel is down to the fact that the book is officially approved by the Albert Einstein Archives (housed at Hebrew U in Jerusalem) and so Patterson liberally sprays his text with Einstein quotes (they all work within the plot and are great fun), as well as simply explaining with a deft writer’s touch ideas such as The Theory of Relativity. These science bits are sprinkled throughout and are lovely touches – buried within the story so as not to feel too sciencey, whilst also clearly imparting knowledge.

Holding many of the ingredients for a key ‘girls in STEM’ title, such as learning about teamwork, caring for the planet, new technology, resilience, kindness to others, and the pursuit of creativity as well as knowledge in problem-solving, this is an excellent story with a warm protagonist who should win hearts everywhere. Includes glorious science-themed black and white illustrations. Find your inner genius here.

The QuentioneersThe Questioneers Book 1: Rosie Revere and the Raucous Riveters by Andrea Beaty and David Roberts
I turn to the Rosie Revere picture books time and again for all sorts of purposes – the rhyming, the illustrations, the scientific message, feminism, the humour, characters, and so much more. Now, engineer Rosie has her own chapter book starring her friends architect Iggy Peck and scientist Ada Twist.

In this first of a series, Rosie’s Great-great Aunt Rose introduces the children to the Blue River Riveters, a group of women who built aeroplanes during WW2. One of them, June, wants to enter an art contest but has broken both her wrists in a motor-scooter accident, so needs Rosie to invent something to help her be able to participate.

The book is smart and fun, despite losing the rhyme, and continues the theme of girls in science as Rosie confronts the historical lack of women in traditional science jobs, as well as providing new themes of cross-generational bonding. As always with Rosie, there is learning from failure and experimentation and developing her persistence and resilience, and also a nod to science with the graph paper backgrounds and illustrated inventions. With its short chapters and two-tone illustrations, this is a good follow-on to younger fiction for those who have read the picture books so many times that they need something new. I can see Rosie going from strength to strength – just like her inventions. Ask your questions here.

Secret ScienceSecret Science: The Amazing World Beyond Your Eyes by Dara O’Briain with Sally Morgan, illustrated by Dan Bramall
I really approve of a comedian writing science books for children. Although I generally dislike promoting celebrity books, this hits a good note with me. It isn’t meant to be high-level science, and is delivered as a narrative strand – much like a comedian delivering a standup routine. And yes, amongst the sciencey bits are plenty of fart jokes, and the text is punctuated (probably almost more than necessary) with a huge number of WORDS IN CAPITALS, different typefaces, and many cartoons. This book covers the science that you can’t see – hormones, forces, energy etc, aiming to answer questions that children will spontaneously ask – why does hair stand on end, how do giraffes sleep? There are some lovely descriptions, including how a jet engine works and comparing it to a hose pipe, as well as parts that describe what stress does to the body and how to relieve it. Luckily, there’s a cool index at the end so that you can dip in rather than read the text all the way through, as it can be quite a noisy book. There are also the now necessary warnings about climate change and the environment. An entertainingly busy read. Discover the secrets here.

 

 

Before we tackle the large non-fiction, I must also draw your attention to a new periodical. The Week Junior has long been a favourite of mine for its bright photographs, news round up and excellent cultural coverage, but now there’s a The Week Junior Science and Nature magazine. This monthly 60 page magazine holds multiple entry points – a reader can dip and discover, absorbing fun facts or reading a feature. The first issue was in September, and featured such current topics as the secret behind Fortnite’s success, but also an in-depth feature on superhumans. Each month will have an eight-page Lab section with experiments and a monthly guide to the night sky for budding astronomers. Really excellent quality. You can order it here.

 

 

the speed of starlight

The Speed of Starlight, written by Colin Stuart, illustrated by Ximo Abadia
Subtitled ‘A Visual Exploration of Physics, Sound, Light and Space’, this is an elegant title with simple text and sharp colourful graphics that uncovers the mystery behind basic quantum physics.

It goes beyond starlight to investigate the science behind space but also how we explore the Universe. Divided into the four sections named in the subtitle, the book explains, using simple graphics, Newton’s Laws of Motion, the insides of an atom, soundwaves, photosynthesis, the colour spectrum and then goes into space.

Any author who’s had an asteroid named after him in recognition of his work to popularise astronomy must know a bit about what he’s writing. Not only does Colin Stuart have the expertise and enthusiasm, but he can explain it in the simplest terms without resorting to cliché. Find your speed here.

 

 

 

the element in the roomThe Element in the Room by Mike Barfield, illustrated by Lauren Humphrey
From physics to chemistry in this illustrated guide to the chemical elements. Any book on chemical elements will feature the periodic table, plus a small handy guide to each element, detailing its name, symbol, atomic number, key characteristics and so on. But here, as well as this basic information, the book is set out as a sleuth story, solving the case of the element in the room with a detective (Sherlock Ohms) whose catchphrase is ‘Elementary’ of course. To add spice and fun to the mix, the text is interspersed with full page comic strips, the first of which, for example, is a fun guide to Aristotle’s belief in the four elements – earth, air, fire and water.

There’s so much information packed into this book it would feel bamboozling if it weren’t for the sheer creativity of the author and illustrator, who explore where in the house the element can be found, (sodium in urine, zinc in nappy cream etc), fun experiments (building an electric lemon), and clever explanations of basic chemistry. You can buy it here.

 

 

first book of quantum physicsMy First Book of Quantum Physics by Sheddad Kaid-Salah Ferron and Eduard Altarriba
The very friendly illustrations, and quite large font size in this book belies the difficultly level of the subject matter and text in this absorbing yet challenging physics book. This book goes in a slightly different direction to the two above, exploring theoretical physics as much as the practical stuff. So, you’ll find pages on Schrodinger’s Cat as well as a page exploring waves and particles. This is an exciting book in that it leads to further thought and investigation rather than just imparting knowledge. There are good colourful graphics that attempt to illuminate the harder principles, such as The Uncertainty Principle or the Mystery of Antimatter, and illustrations that will explode the mind, such as the Tunnel Effect. I liked the graphic representation of the periodic table here – building blocks fitting together like Lego, and CERN represented as a toy train track. Amusing, stimulating and challenging – an awesome if ambitious science book. Explore theorem here.

 

Books of Wonder: Information and Knowledge

When I was growing up there was a television series called The Wonder Years, and very often I hear adults talking about a child’s sense of wonder at the world around them. I don’t know who first attributed the wonder quality to childhood, but if a child is less jaded, more open to being amazed or dazzled by the world than adults, then they’ll be even more entranced with this selection of books than I am.

atlas of adventures wonders of the worldatlas of adventures wonders
Atlas of Adventures: Wonders of the World, illustrated by Lucy Letherland, written by Ben Handicott

I first came across Lucy Letherland’s Atlas of Adventures in a school hall in 2014, reviewed it as one of my first books of the week, and since then my blog, and Letherland’s series has gone from strength to strength. The Wonders of the World title, however, is truly awesome, or should I say wonderful. Veering off the path of the traditional wonders of the world, Ben Handicott has picked his own; choosing 30 destinations from as far apart as Death Valley to The Forbidden City.

Introducing his wonders, Ben makes the point of explaining that wonder can be found in the simplicity of a flower blooming in your backyard as much as in the intricacies of the Sagrada Familia, but explains that some wonders are worth travelling for.

Letherland’s full page illustrations of each wonder, drawn from different and intriguing perspectives, and following on from maps of each geographical area, are truly magnificent; each populated with a raft of tourists, indigenous peoples and animals in an imaginative out-of-this-world harmony. And Handicott’s text not only introduces the site with a couple of paragraphs and snapshot information, but illuminates single sentence facts around the illustrations. His annotations on the illustration of Neuschwanstein Castle, thought to be an inspiration for Walt Disney’s fairy tale castle, highlight the modern fixtures and fittings within.

This is a bold book, in the choice of wonders and also in the guilty irreverence of some of the illustrations, (Merlin at Stonehenge, for example), but all provoke fascination in the reader. Maps fix the natural and man-made wonders firmly in their geographical position. Watch for the tourists posing at the Leaning Tower of Pisa or the bears in Yosemite. I found a marathon runner on the Great Wall of China. Can you? Find your wonder here.

welcome to our world
Welcome to Our World: A Celebration of Children Everywhere by Moira Butterfield and Harriet Lynas
With illustrations and theme reminiscent of Disneyworld’s It’s a Small World ride, this is a colourful look at childhood around the world, highlighting differences but above all sending the message of what humans have in common. The first page highlights flags, then the author looks at various ways of saying hello in different languages (with a phonetic spelling for pronunciation), as well as showcasing types of names, foods, homes, pets, and transport in different countries. For any child wanting to see how others live, this is a great introduction. There are quirks, as well as that which is familiar and relevant to children, such as school uniform, musical instruments etc. The quirks include cures for hiccups, phrases, manners and playground games. With their saucer faces and big black button eyes, the illustrations are doll-like and immensely colourful, reminding me of the collection of native dress dolls that I had as a child. Appealing and eclectic, this is a great fact-finder for the very young – kids will enjoy the celebration cakes from around the world. There’s a list of countries featured at the end of the book, and great production values throughout. Age 4+. Welcome to your world here.

one day so many ways
One Day So Many Ways by Laura Hall, illustrated by Loris Lora

Not so dissimilar is this large-size illustrated guide to 40 children from around the world, also looking at a 24 hour period, in which it compares lifestyles and habits, including houses, meals, transport to school, playtime and so on. The illustrations of the children here are slightly less doll-like, but also stylised to look similar despite their differences – almond eyes, simple bodies – they reminded me of Topsy and Tim in that last-century-retro-way. Features that differentiate from the book above include a spread called Quiet Time, which features prayer, reading time and meditation amongst other pursuits, and asks the reader to contemplate their own life features. Weekend jobs, family time, helping out and reading are also explored, as well as the more mundane foods, bedtime, friends and homework. The Highlights page showcases the highlights of some of the children’s days, and it’s clear that weather can play a large part in how children live their lives. There’s a list of countries at the back with flags and facts, and this will be a good addition in showing children the different cultures and ways of life around the world, despite the inherent similarities of childhood. You can buy it here.

wonders of the world
Wonders of the World by Isabel Otter and Margaux Carpentier
Where best to find wonder than in the traditionally designated ‘seven wonders of the world’? This book is much smaller and squarer than Lucy Letherland’s Atlas of Adventures: Wonders of the World and is aimed at younger children, highlighting the Ancient Wonders and Modern Wonders, exploring all 14 in a colourful lift-the-flap informative book. Each wonder receives a full page, with introductory text, and some supplementary information in small paragraphs, such as exploring that the Colossus of Rhodes was the inspiration behind the modern Statue of Liberty.

An interactive wheel displays the plants of the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, as well as the features of the Lantern Room on the Lighthouse of Alexandria. This is a colourful dip into the beautiful buildings that defined their eras, and the colour palate matches well with the romance behind each – pink and patterned egg blue for the Taj Mahal, deep orange and yellow for the Great Pyramid of Giza. This cardboard novelty book has a page at the end detailing some natural wonders too. Age 7+. Find a wonder here.

treasure hunt house
Treasure Hunt House by Kate Davies and Becca Stadtlander
Not all wonders are to be found in distant places and time. This book is both a game, in that it’s a literal treasure hunt – readers must lift the flaps to solve the clues – but also a treasure trove in that it gives fascinating facts about the wonders to be found in a domestic realm. Two children go to visit their Great Aunt Martha in her house – this is not an ordinary house though, containing a music room, conservatory, library and hall of inventions. More like a stately home, although many of the items are to be found in every domestic environment, and the book gives the history behind the telephone, fridge, toilet and bath as well as stepping into the more eclectic, such as exploring a Chinese lacquered mirror, platform shoes, Renoir painting and more.

This is exploration and history and activity all in one book. The illustrations themselves are like a treasure hunt – detailed, fascinating and rather intricate – they immerse the reader in the book. The readership is hard to define here – it’s probably something that could span a host of ages – the clues are very easy to solve, but the text in some places feels older. Age 7+. Find your treasure here.

curiositree
The Curiositree: Human World: A Visual Compendium of Wonders from Human History by Amanda Wood and Mike Jolley
A second in this series – the first Curiositree explored the natural world – now we are into human history. Divided into sections – with three colour-matching ribbons to bookmark a reader’s place – each spread is labelled as a ‘chart’. This is down to the fact that the book is remarkably visual. There is a glut of information on each topic, and although the typeface is minuscule, each ‘chart’ is different from the one before and includes many illustrations, infographics and diagrams to showcase the topic.

The three colours of the ribbons, like the colour-coding inside, represent the three strands of discovery in the book: human history, art and culture, science, trade and technology. I expected more page cross-referencing across the topics, but was nicely surprised by the depth of knowledge on individual items, such as the history of metal usage, breakthrough thinking ie in maths, and the over-riding themes of the history of farming and music.
curiositree writing
It’s difficult to showcase thousands of years of human development in a 112 page book for children and the authors do an admirable job. Of course there’s much missing, and I had rather hoped for a little more information on religion and philosophical thought before launching into Stonehenge, ancient temples and tombs, but on the whole this is a great resource, and I suppose why it is a compendium rather than an encyclopedia.

Towards the end there is information on printing and world exploration – because the book travels up to the early 1600s only. Although this is clearly aimed at much older children, in that it introduces complex themes, has a complicated layout (for dipping and researching), and articulates in a non-patronising but technically more sophisticated manner, younger readers will enjoy the detailed and colourful illustrations throughout. Aimed at 8+ years and older. Stimulate your curiosity here.

transport and travelfoods of the world
Transport and Travel Mini Hardback by Sandra Lawrence, illustrated by Jem Maybank and Foods of the World: Mini Hardback by Libby Walden and Jocelyn Kao.
For those who prefer their factual information to be more bitesize and topic-based, these two excellent little companions will be useful for curious children wondering about the world, and useful as classroom resources. Rather than holding an encyclopaedic knowledge of the topic, these dip in with illustrations dominating each page, and a couple of sentences at the top to give background.

The transport book divides nicely into wheels, rail, air and water and picks out where transport has become rather famous – the San Francisco tram, the Shinkansen railway network in Japan. There’s also a nice mix of history – the Viking longboats, and future – the jet pack. Foods of the World is even more random in its choice of information. There are customs and traditions, celebratory food and a strange section called ‘playing with food’, with quirky facts such as competitive eating, food fights and the accidental creation of bubble gum. More fun than fodder for thought, this is a good title to have in the KS1 classroom. Age 5+ years. You can buy them here and here.

Little Guide to Great Lives: Marie Curie by Isabel Thomas, illustrations by Anke Weckmann

marie curie
There’s been a glut of biographies of women recently, not only to fill the gap in the market, but also to celebrate the centenary of the first women getting the vote in the UK. But this new series, Little Guides to Great Lives, also features men, and isn’t skewed towards the women’s suffrage movement. Rather than a bound anthology of biographies, each of these biographies is a small standalone book, although they are exquisitely designed and so do look good together on the shelf.little guides to great lives

Other than their size and design, what makes these biographies stand out is the ease with which the stories are told, the fascinating details included, and the chatty tone of the prose. Including quotations from the famous people themselves, and questions about why their lives matter and what made them who they were, these are intriguing little books.

The book about Marie Curie starts with her childhood – including references to her siblings, her friendships and even her likes and dislikes. Cartoonish illustrations complete with speech bubbles give pause for thought, empathy and understanding; a child reader might quickly relate to a wild child who loved lemonade and ice cream.

With the world outside encroaching on her life, and a lack of money and lack of opportunity as a girl, boredom and frustration eventually turn to studiousness and adventure when Marie makes her way to France and the Sorbonne. Marie’s own scientific studies take off, and here the book really excels: explaining very clearly to the reader the science she was testing, the notes she made, the importance and relevance of her discoveries and the ongoing impact she has on science and our world.

Each book in the series deals with their subject in this way – starting with childhood but not just the dry facts. The books drill down into the person’s emotional stability, the benefits they experienced or the deprivations they suffered. Successes and failures are highlighted, as well as the impact of the outer world and when they had to overcome something difficult or sad and persevere. With only 64 pages in which to accomplish the extraordinary tale of Marie Curie, Thomas keeps the prose succinct and neat, but with small dashes of personality so that it feels lively and relevant.

The design is part of the appeal too. The hardback textured cover shows articles that made a difference in the subjects’ lives – Marie Curie’s is full of chemical symbols, test-tubes and writing implements, whereas Frida Kahlo has monkeys, skulls, watermelon and the Mexican flag. The colour theme from the cover is then extended throughout the book – each is highly illustrated in colour.

The books also contain glossaries, indexes and timelines for quick glances, and so far the personalities chosen bear out an equality in gender and global significance. (The sixth title, publishing in the autumn, is Charles Darwin). Frida Kahlo publishes to coincide with the V&A’s upcoming exhibition (London), and Amelia Earhart and Leonardo Da Vinci titles tie in well with the Year of Engineering. It’s been 100 years since the birth of Nelson Mandela, so it’s fitting to have that title too.

These are wonderful treasures for any child’s bookcase, and an absolute pleasure to read, share and own. I’d recommend 7+ years – but they are of equally good quality and substance for those just starting secondary school who need to do topic work. You can buy Little Guides to Great Lives: Marie Curie here. And the others here.

she persisted

While we’re dealing with biographies, and seeing as I’ve cheated on having just ‘one book of the week’, you might also extend your wishlist to include She Persisted Around the World by Chelsea Clinton, illustrated by Alexandra Boiger. This book profiles 13 women who changed history, particularly those who were told to quiet down and had to strongly persist. Including Marie Curie, but also Sor Juana, Leymah Gbowee, Wangari Maathai, this is an unusual collection and profiles each woman in just a couple of sentences. It’s a flavour, an inspiration perhaps. You can buy it here.