Seasonal Books for Younger Readers Part 1

My next couple of blogposts feature my selection of Christmas books: firstly four books for the youngest readers. Another four follow on Wednesday.

is it christmas yet

Is it Christmas Yet? by Jane Chapman

Sometimes the simplest titles are the best. Jane Chapman has a wonderfully sympathetic drawing style when tackling bears, and this depiction of an over-excited cub and his weary parent is no exception. Produced this year in a padded board book for the smallest child with an enticing glittery cover – even if it goes in the toddler’s mouth, it shouldn’t get too damaged!

It depicts the bears’ preparation for Christmas Day – wrapping presents and finding a tree, although the cub has a little more enthusiasm than the parent. The illustrations caused this book to end up in my list of Christmas picks – the cub’s playfulness is irresistible, while the parent bear goes through all the emotions that parents do in the run up to make a perfect Christmas – from growling to sighing to mumbling to huffing and moaning. But in the end, Christmas arrives, and it looks fairly perfect to me. You can purchase it here.

socks for santa

Socks for Santa by Adam and Charlotte Guillain and Lee Wildish
There’s always room on my bookshelves for another ‘George’ picture book. After the success of Spaghetti with the Yeti, Marshmallows for Martians and the other titles in the series, I was excited to hear there would be Socks for Santa. It didn’t disappoint. In fact, I think it’s one of the best. Generous and thoughtful George decides to take Santa some presents at Christmas in return for him giving them out every year. However, there are of course some hitches along the way – the elves need help with wrapping, Rudolph has a cold, and the reindeers open Santa’s presents. The rhyming text skips happily along telling the story, but the true delight of this title lies in Wildish’s illustrations.

From puffins sliding on ice and pulling a sleigh to the wonderful snowball fight with bears to my favourite of all – the reindeer playing connect four. There is so much detail and glee in all the illustrations, that no child could be unhappy opening this under the tree. Wholeheartedly recommended – and illustrations I want for my illustrators’ wall! Click here to buy.

one snowy rescue

One Snowy Rescue by M Christina Butler and Tina Macnaughton
This is one busy hedgehog. The ninth little hedgehog book won me over with the furry red hat. (Yes, I’m that easy!). Advertised on the front as a touch and feel book, the reader can trace their fingers over the felt red hat on every page. It’s quite alluring.

Little Hedgehog finds it difficult to navigate the snow, and relies on his friends to pull him out of various hitches, including a snow drift and some icy water. Each time his bright red hat signals to his friends that he is in danger, and he is rescued. However, the whole point of his trek through the snow is to rescue someone even smaller than him, which he succeeds in doing in the end. It’s a lovely little tale for small children – about helping each other, in a lovingly drawn winter landscape. You can buy it here from Waterstones.

magical snow garden

The Magical Snow Garden by Tracey Corderoy and Jane Chapman
Most people have a penchant for penguins (in picture books). Not in reality of course, as they smell, but in picture books they tend to be drawn as slightly more fluffy and cutesy. This is definitely the case here. Wellington the Penguin enjoys reading books, but when he spies a garden in one of his picture books he sets out to recreate it. Despite his friends’ lack of enthusiasm he does build a garden out of recycled rubbish (there are no seeds available and things won’t grow in the snow.)

Once all the sweet wrappers have been shaped and twisted, the garden looks fabulous, but then overnight the magical snow garden is blown away by a nasty storm wind. This time his friends help him to recreate the garden, and it is so magical that creatures come from all over the world to see it.

This completely fantastical story is drawn beautifully by Jane Chapman – glitter on the cover of course, but a garden reminiscent of Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory, with fountains and flowers and cuckoos – all made from wrappers. A reference to recycling – or just a clever way to add colour to the snow – either way, it makes for a fine addition to the ‘snow’ picture book flurry. Purchase here from Waterstones.