Dinosaurs

One non-fiction area in the children’s bookshop or library that’s always teeming with books is the one labelled ‘dinosaurs’. With frequent new discoveries, it’s a fascinating time for anyone interested in the topic. Publishers are increasingly inventing new ways to look at dinosaurs, and these four books couldn’t be more different in their approach and target audience:


Nibbles: The Dinosaur Guide by Emma Yarlett
Nibbles first came to our attention last year, subversively nibbling through the pages of fairy tales, and introducing children to picture books through play and investigation. Now this cute monster is back in a book that attempts to introduce some non-fiction about dinosaurs, in an accessible and friendly, and again, slightly subversive way, as Nibbles tries again to eat his way through the book. (There are numerous cut-outs to see through, and flaps to lift). But this time, Nibbles is not contending with Goldilocks, but with a charging triceratops and a farting diplodocus. Combining story (Nibbles) with facts (dinosaurs), Yarlett introduces dinosaurs for the very young, but never talks down to them.

The book is colourful and chatty, and identifies each species in a friendly way – for example, triceratops was ‘roughly the length of a double decker bus’. Although there are more difficult words for a young reader, such as herbivore, they are only included if important, and mostly Yarlett allows the reader to relate to her text with sentences such as ‘Scientists say they had big bums and large stompy feet’. The whole book is a chase to find Nibbles, all the while exploring different species, and the book ends with a rather delightful joke about comets.

Illustrations are cute rather than scientific, but Yarlett manages to introduce the use of annotations and captions in a clever combination of non-fiction and playfulness. Another winner. Highly recommended. You can purchase it here.


Dinosaurium: Welcome to the Museum by Lily Murray and Chris Wormell
A long-awaited tome, and one of the best suited to the Welcome to the Museum series, this is an exquisite title for anyone interested in dinosaurs. The scientifically-rendered illustrations are actually digital engravings in full colour, although the colour is muted so that it doesn’t feel artificial.

In fact, the whole book has a scientific approach, although it is always clear, concise and accessible. Each species is examined in terms of how they ate, moved, lived and fought, and the book also explores the great span of time in which dinosaurs lived – and how they evolved and changed.

As with other books in the series, each species is given a full page illustration, or a horizontal half spread, with detailed accompanying text with a serious, intense amount of detail and full Latin names. Pronunciation may be a challenge, but the amount of knowledge imparted here is awesome.

Particularly inspiring is the cladogram (dinosaur family tree), and the fascinating chapter at the end on non-dinosaurs (including mammals, reptiles, extinction and survivors).

This is one of the most comprehensive and enticing books on dinosaurs produced recently, and seeing as we are in a golden age of dinosaur discovery and understanding, this is an apt and beautiful addition to the dinosaur canon. You can purchase it here.


Make and Move Mega: Dinosaurs by Sato Hisao
Not so much a book, as a paper making activitity, this pack contains five dinosaur models, flat-packed, to press out, slot together and play. There are levers included so that each dinosaur can move and ‘roar’ when the levers are pulled. T-Rex, triceratops, apatosaurus, stegosaurus and pterandon are included, and no scissors or glue are needed.

However, as I embarked on the venture with a willing ten year old, we found that brains are most certainly needed. This is not a ‘cute’ activity for a young child, but a technically quite difficult paper folding and slotting experiment. The lengthy instructions are laid out in graphics without text, much like an Ikea piece of furniture, and there is just a simple paragraph at the beginning introducing each species.

The good news is that we did succeed. A model was made, complete with levers, although I’m not sure ours was exactly as the toy engineer author intended.

A lengthy task, but the paper is sturdy enough that none was torn during the making, and a satisfying conclusion was reached! An excellent rainy day activity for an older dinosaur enthusiast.


The World of Supersaurs: Raptors in Paradise by Jay Jay Burridge
And lastly, this Jurassic Park novel that sets out to describe a world in which dinosaurs never died out, and humans live side by side with the creatures. From the cover, the reader can already see that living together may not always be harmonious, and there’s plenty of adventure within.

Bea Kingsley’s explorer parents went missing eleven years prior, when Bea was just a baby, and now she is venturing with her grandparents to the Indonesian islands of Aru, ostensibly on holiday, but it’s also the last place her parents were seen. The islands are also home to the elusive Raptors of Paradise, and before long there is trouble.

The book reads like an old-fashioned adventure, and the frequent black and white illustrations enhance this idea (in fact I sometimes felt as if they had been inspired by Westworld or Indiana Jones). The book is set in a fictional 1932 and belongs to a time in which people voyaged by sea, there were trading companies, and girls were expected to behave in a certain way.

This is one of many enjoyable subversive facets to the dinosaur story – in that the protagonist is female, and the author shows her grandparents also adventuring, rather than being discarded at the outset. The text in places is a little clunky, but most readers will happily skip through the story, as the action comes fast, and readers will be eager to use the app that accompanies the text to explore the many illustrations.

The Supersaurs app (crucially available on both android and apple) uses augmented reality with a camera to bring the illustrations to life – they literally ‘pop up’ from the page, and are easy to use and hugely effective (as well as being enormous fun). There’s also an option to ‘play’ with the book too, using the app to seek features in the book. It’s clever and engaging.

The book contains a heavy appendix with dinosaur descriptions.The Supersaurs brand neatly brings old and new together, and is worth noting for super dinosaur enthusiasts. First in a series. You can purchase it here.