Freedom to Draw

In view of the world’s events last week, I thought it would be appropriate to share my thoughts on books that encourage children to draw, to dabble in cartoons and illustration, and to use drawing to express a point of view. Teachers use the power of drawing in many ways – whether it be early mark making, or at a later stage to help tease out the emotions and narrative threads in a story.

In my line of work I’m lucky to interact with plenty of illustrators, and when I saw Oliver Jeffers and Quentin Blake in conversation last year, my children were blessed to have a small tutorial by Oliver Jeffers on how to draw his iconic penguin. It’s created from a few very simple lines. Illustrators have taught me that sometimes the simplicity of a pen stroke can tell a whole story.
oliver jeffers penguin

Three picture books that promote the ability to create a story from a simple pen stroke are as follows:
The PencilThe pencil inside

The Pencil by Allan Ahlberg, illustrated by Bruce Ingman
The book starts with a pencil, all alone, who one day decides to draw. The pencil draws characters, and then a scene, and then actions, and after a flash of inspiration, a paintbrush which paints colours onto everything. When the world that’s been created starts to go wrong, the pencil draws an eraser…and chaos ensues. The characters, although all drawn by the pencil, have their own identities and want distinctly different things, and the rubber has its own agenda too. There are some lovely touches, such as when the rubber rubs out the chair from underneath the boy. There are some serious messages in here though – what can we create from nothing – and what would we create – and what happens when what we create doesn’t go as planned, and how we rectify it.
Dog loves Drawingdoodle Dog Loves Drawing

Dog Loves Drawing by Louise Yates
This dog loves books and drawing, which is fantastic. The idea is much the same as in The Pencil, Dog draws and as he draws the pictures come to life, and he creates a narrative. My favourite page is the page of doodles, the stickman pointing out:
“That’s the best way to come up with ideas.”
Brilliantly, the pictures Dog draws are simple and inspirational so any child reading the book can attempt to copy them. They are also drawn in simple pencil crayon and some are unfinished so drawing novices can really see how the animal takes shape. We managed a particularly good crab and owl.
crab Dog Loves Drawing
The book is full of humour too, as each new character also takes up a pencil or pen or paintbrush, and has its own ideas about what to do. In most cases though, the characters work as a team; dog draws a boat whilst crab scribbles the sea. The duck manages to mess things up by drawing a monster, and Dog has to escape back into his bookshop, but makes sure that his new friends are safe too. It’s a book that tells a sweet story, and promotes a love of drawing, with much fun along the way.

The Dot

The Dot by Peter Reynolds
There’s now a tenth anniversary pack on sale for this wonderful book. It tells the story of Vashti who thinks that she cannot draw, and so leaves her sheet of paper blank at the end of the lesson. Her marvellous teacher grabs the opportunity to see potential in her pupil, and Vashti gradually learns how to express herself through dots. Vashti experiments with colour and even blank spaces, and eventually gains enough confidence to pass the life lesson onto another child. The book is about using art to express yourself, having someone to believe in you, and how gaining confidence can influence a growing self-belief in others. Peter Reynolds also published a book called Ish, which is about children worrying that what they’ve drawn isn’t good enough, and overcoming that fear. You can watch him reading Dot here.

The Day in the Crayons Quit

Lastly, one book I must include but which speaks out with a slightly different message is The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt, illustrated by Oliver Jeffers. Duncan’s box of crayons send him a stack of letters, each one signed by a different colour crayon with a different message. Some are overworked, many are cross at being stereotyped (pink wants to be used more). The message is again one of individuality amongst the crayons – a rising up of the ‘workers’ against the ‘employer’, but also, much more pertinently, one of suggesting to a child that they can stretch the boundaries and use colours in a different way –promoting freedom of expression. Why can’t the sky be yellow, the sea be green, the whale be orange and the rainbow be black? This book has been shortlisted for the 2015 Red House Children’s Book Award.

All of these books inspire children to draw. Starting with a blank page – what narrative would we create and how would we illustrate it? Whether it be telling a story, expressing an emotion, or an opinion – illustrations can be hugely powerful things.

If your children love drawing, see this link from Guardian Children’s which teaches how to draw some favourite characters from children’s books.

 

 

With thanks to http://www.ojxdi.com/ for the Oliver Jeffers’s penguin image.

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