Friendship: Best Friends Forever

“You have been my friend. That in itself is a tremendous thing.” Charlotte’s Web by E B White.

One of the best things children’s books do is serve as a guide for how to get out of scrapes, and behave in certain situations – they can help children navigate social behaviours. These three books (all of which are part of a series – a big draw for children), depict female characters with whom young girls can identify, and familiar situations in which they may find themselves, all crafted with a touch of humour.

Emily Sparkes

Emily Sparkes and the Friendship Fiasco by Ruth Fitzgerald
The first in a brand new series, Emily Sparkes is a sparkling new addition to children’s literature. She bubbles with witty observations on her friends, her family and teachers, and muddles along in her day-to-day quest to survive school, friendships and parental issues. Emily’s life is not out of the ordinary; she goes to school every day, her parents have just had a new baby, and she worries about schoolwork, friendships and being stuck on the bus with Gross-out Gavin. She is an easily identifiable character, with a clear compass for right and wrong and perceived ills, which stands her in good stead with all those around her.
What I find really refreshing about Emily is that she seems to be a ‘middling child’. She’s not bullied, nor a bully, not the most popular nor the least, not the most academic and not the least – the sort of child whom parents feel often gets ignored. In this, Ruth Fitzgerald proves that the ‘unnoticeable’ should be noticed, as Emily’s wit sparkles in every circumstance in which she finds herself. I particularly liked her astute observations on her parents, and I appreciated the cute illustrations – which make it seem as if Emily has decorated her own book with doodles, drawings and stickers. The Friendship Fiasco starts with Emily’s best friend leaving and relocating with her family, and a new girl starting at school, with whom Emily desperately wants to make friends. All is not quite as it seems with new girl Chloe though, and after some misunderstandings are dealt with, Emily realises that maybe her new best friend has been in the classroom all along. A great new character, with some laugh-out-loud scenes. Publishes February 3rd.

Also to be published later this year, Emily Sparkes and the Competition Calamity

Old Friends New Friends

New Friend Old Friends by Julia Jarman
Julia’s series on friendships takes on a slightly different style, as the stories are narrated piecemeal by the friends in the story – first one, then another. There’s an introduction to each character at the beginning to help the reader navigate around who’s who. This works very well and is quite clever, in that the personalities of the girls begin to shine through; the tone shifting slightly between each child, and the reader has the omniscient eye of knowing what all the girls think. It enables the reader to foresee problems and jealousies that will inevitably arise. New Friend Old Friends introduces Shazia from Pakistan, and relates how the group of friends help her to fit in and adjust to life in England. It’s a fun read with realistic characters and situations. The illustrations are animated and accentuate the girls’ differences.

Also available, Make Friends Break Friends, A Friend in Need, and soon to be published, Friends Forever

Pea's Book

Pea’s Book of Best Friends by Susie Day
There’s nothing like an eccentric family in children’s literature. Almost reminiscent of I Capture the Castle, this glorious encounter with the Llewelllyns is highly visual and engrossing. Pea’s Book of Best Friends introduces Pea and her two sisters, Clover and Tinkerbell and describes their move to London. As with the other books here, the quest is on to find a new best friend, as Pea discovers that her old best friend isn’t missing her as much as she thinks. Pea makes a list of qualities she’d like in her new best friend in London, only to realise that people aren’t usually very well suited to lists – they tend to be slightly more complicated. The roundedness of the story is what appealed to me most – as Pea finds out that not only do her sisters also need to make new friends, but so does their Mum. There are some wonderfully funny touches, and it is a very sweet, and yet slightly quirky book, and Susie Day shows great skill in honing in on a girl’s experience of school and family. This is for a slightly older age group than those above – more 8+yrs.

Also available, Pea’s Book of Big Dreams, Pea’s Book of Birthdays, Pea’s Book of Holidays

 

Thank you to LBKids Publishers for providing me with a copy of Emily Sparkes and the Friendship Fiasco.

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