Harold’s Hungry Eyes Blog Tour

In literary agent Jonny Geller’s TED talk about what makes a bestselling book, he talks about five key components, one of which is resonance.

Resonance is exactly what it says on the tin – what resonates for you about a story? Of course we’re all wired differently – what resonates for me in a novel won’t be the same as for you. As a reader I bring my own experiences, memories and feelings to a book as I read it.

For children just starting out in the world, what resonates for them? One of my children has had the same weekly piece of homework all year:

‘Look out the window’.

What does a child see when they look out the window? What resonates for them? It will be different for each one, even those looking at the same view. So, to help with this today, and as part of the Harold’s Hungry Eyes blog tour, I have three books that take the world around us, and make different shapes from it – what do you see in the world around you that resonates for you?

Harolds Hungry Eyes 2d

Harold’s Hungry Eyes by Kevin Waldron

This adorable picture book follows a food-obsessed boston terrier called Harold as he searches New York for his missing favourite chair. Harold’s eye view of the city is very much his own. Although he sees a typical mail box, a yellow school bus, a clock on a building and a chained bicycle, to his eyes they are different. The mail box is an oven with roast chicken inside, the school bus a chunk of cheese, the clock a pie and the bicycle wheels two pretzels.

Kevin Waldron cleverly manages to combine an everyman’s depiction of the city as bustling, busy and daunting, with Harold’s viewpoint of seeing food everywhere. Waldron does this physically – denoting the city with black line drawings and colour block, and then collage-style layering the image with photographs of food. It’s effective and different.

Harold isn’t a cute dog, but he has the reader’s sympathy from the outset with his large black eyes making eye contact with the reader from page one, and he grabs the child’s empathy by seeing the traffic lights as ice creams on the title page. His innermost dreams are exposed to the reader from early on – choc ice vehicles, raspberry fire hydrants, and my absolute favourite – toaster buildings.

But New York is also a character here – the setting itself depicted in shadows and lines with its distinctive look and multitude of busy busy people, which combines to project a sense of loss and loneliness common to small beings in big cities.

Harold’s insatiable hunger is the driving force behind the plot and the narrative though, and children will delight in the wafer staircase and croissant couch at the uplifting ending.

I have one copy of Harold’s Hungry Eyes to give away (UK only). See @minervamoan on twitter for the giveaway. And click here to buy.

the cloudspotter

Even if you don’t see food in buildings, you have almost certainly played shapeshifters with clouds. The Cloudspotter by Tom McLaughlin is another tale of loneliness, although again the protagonist isn’t aware of it. Our small boy is a dreamer, seeing stories and emotions hidden with the clouds. When a dog comes to join in the fun, the boy is irritated at the intrusion but before long comes to understand that a cloud shared is happier than a story told to oneself only.

Tom McLaughlin also uses a special type of layering to create his illustrations here – the illusion of the clouds making stories – and the paint really does look like clouds – with a layer of greyed line illustration on top to show how the boy, and then the dog interact within the cloud story.

The clouds morph into everything – from castles in the sky to musical instruments, and even bones. Reminiscent of Oliver Jeffers’ Lost and Found – in which the boy (also in a stripy jumper) doesn’t realise that the animal is after friendship, The Cloudspotter depicts our hero with glasses, and boldly enjoying his solitude, which as Tom Hanks delightfully pointed out last week in Desert Island Discs, isn’t the same as loneliness.

Fabulous for leading children into the world of seeing shapes in the clouds, and using imagination to turn the view out of the window into an adventure. You can buy it here.

footpath flowers

One more, which like Harold’s Hungry Eyes, places the city as more than a setting – perhaps even a character in its own right – is Footpath Flowers by Jon Arno Lawson and Sydney Smith. A girl (in red) whilst all else is in black and white – yes an oft-used device – gathers flowers while her distracted father walks her through the city. Incidences of colour pop up, the fruit at the grocer’s, the yellow cabs, and of course the flowers that the girl collects.

As they wend through the city, she gives out flowers too, and each gift is transformative in some way – showing the power of giving, and of small gestures, and joy in natural things.

Whilst the father is distracted, he lets the child stop and gather flowers, and holds her hand. He is a supportive parent, as seen by his careful smile on the cover.

The book is wordless – the pictures alone – graphic novel style – tell the story. It’s a modern story – the father is pictured on his phone, the people at the bus stop are a diverse mix, there are runners in the park. But what is truly exemplary about this book is the juxtaposition of the facelessness of the city with the stamp of the individual.

Each page can be devoured for its subtle depiction of individuals lives within a city as a whole – what are the people doing sitting in the back of the open truck? What do the birds see from their perch above the road? From different angles, with different elements of colour, this is an intriguing picture book – and one that carries a simple yet effective message.

My favourite moments, those which resonated for me, – the hug between mother and child – and the mother’s stance looking at her children in the garden – this last image fascinating for the fact that the illustrator has purposefully cut the picture so that the reader can’t see the mother’s eyes, nor the child in red as she is walking out the picture. Read it and draw your own conclusions; it certainly presents different viewpoints outside the window. You can buy it here.

Please note this title is called Sidewalk Flowers in the United States.

 

If you like Harold’s Hungry Eyes by Kevin Waldron, then you can download the screen saver here and activity here.