Libraries: Here Today, Gone Tomorrow?

My local council is proposing to close my public library. I’m not alone – this is happening all over the country. My blog isn’t political though, so I’m not going to explore our campaign, although if you’re interested please go to the links at the end.

According to the National Literacy Trust a child who visits a library is twice as likely to be a fluent reader as one who does not. There is a flush of excitement on the faces of the children who come into my library for library club. They are keen to read, to push open the doorway to their imaginations, to discover mindblowing facts and to share them with me. We learn new words, read incredible stories, laugh at jokes, and gasp at information. This week in the library we discussed the word ‘shone’, we giggled that mice park their boats at the hickory dickory dock, we discovered that you can have a trip to the moon, a pet monster, pirates and a genie’s lamp all in one story (Monstar Marks a Wish by Steve Cole, illustrated by Pete Williamson), and we learned that the study of clocks is called horology.

The author SF Said says that libraries are cathedrals of books, temples of information. My library constantly surprises me. It’s a treasure trove of inspiration and creativity.

My favourite books celebrating libraries are as follows:

Homer the library cat

Homer, the Library Cat by Reeve Lindbergh, illustrated by Anne Wilsdorf
A delightful rhyming book that explores the sense of peace that can be obtained in a public library space. Homer the cat is spooked by a loud bang from the bins and rushes off to find his owner, ‘the quiet lady’. He finds noise everywhere throughout the town, until he reaches a beautiful building, within which he can hear his ‘quiet lady’ and some children. The library in this book clearly has no budget shortage – a large building with marble floors, and a dedicated librarian for storytime. Homer soon discovers the joy of the library – the comfort of the storyteller’s chair, the colourful books, the playful children, the quiet of storytime and snacks:
“The boys and girls loved Homer.
Homer loved them back.
He slept right through the stories
but woke up for the snack.”

Otto the Book Bear

Otto the Book Bear by Katie Cleminson
Otto is a bear, but like Homer the cat, also on the prowl for a place of refuge, acceptance and books. Otto the Bear lives within a storybook, and is happiest when the children are reading his book, but he also comes to life when they’re asleep. Sadly, one day the children move away and Otto is left behind. The story follows his adventures as he struggles to find a safe, welcoming sanctuary. He finally discovers a “place that looked full of light and hope.” Of course, it’s a library, and Otto discovers books, other book creatures like himself, and of course many many readers. Simply told and illustrated, this is a heartwarming story to introduce the youngest audience to a love of books.

library lion

Library Lion by Michelle Knudsen, illustrated by Kevin Hawkes
This exquisite, slightly longer picture book, pitched at an older age group, features a library’s set of rules: no running, quiet at all times etc. One day a lion appears in the library, but he doesn’t break the rules and he appears to want to help the librarian, and so he becomes a regular fixture, helping small children to reach books, providing a back rest during storytime.

library lion inside3library lion inside2

Until, the day when he does break the rules of the library, and not able to overcome his own shame, he leaves. The librarian and the people in the library are distraught – he broke the rules for good reason, and so in the end he is sought, found and welcomed back. The soft images are suffused with light, warmth and pathos – this is a stellar example of library envy – you almost feel you want to jump into the book. There is also a distinct cleverness in this book – for although a picture book – the portrayal of the librarian is so strong, that you really feel you know Miss Merriweather’s character by the end of the book.

the librarian of basra

The Librarian of Basra by Jeanette Winter
Another lady librarian, this is a careful depiction of the true story of Alia Muhammad Baker, a remarkable woman who did all she could to save the wonderful books in her library from destruction as bombs rained around her in Basra, Iraq. In fact she saved 70 per cent of the books in her library, at considerable danger to herself. This is a great story for children aged 6 and over to explore the impact of war, to discover that one should stand up for one’s beliefs, and have courage in the face of danger. Ultimately, it speaks to everyone about the power and importance of books, and preserving culture and history. It tells the story incredibly simply, leaving out lots of details, but the scarcity of words adds to the atmosphere and lends itself to being read by children – the true circumstances of the war would be too cumbersome at this age. Illustrated with bright bold acrylics, it also gives children a sense of a culture from a different part of the world. There is an author’s note at the end to give background information.

photo posted on post-gazette.com

It’s a shame that so many booklovers and librarians nationwide have to now battle with their councils to keep public libraries open. I’ll leave Neil Gaiman to have the last word on libraries:

“If you do not value libraries then you do not value information or culture or wisdom. You are silencing the voices of the past and you are damaging the future.”

2014 Seighart Report on Public Libraries

Save Barnet Libraries information

Save Barnet Libraries petition

  5 comments for “Libraries: Here Today, Gone Tomorrow?

  1. Anne
    January 18, 2015 at 6:13 pm

    Some great suggestions. I didn’t know of The Librarian of Basra & will order for school library. The picture book A Library Book for Bear by Bonnie Becker is fun. I love the way that Bear is converted to a library user by listening to a story with which he can identify.

    • Minerva
      January 18, 2015 at 6:15 pm

      Brilliant, just like children liking stories with which they identify. Thanks Anne, great suggestion.

  2. Rachael
    January 18, 2015 at 10:29 am

    Good luck with the petition.

    Check out the new Ralfy Rabbit, book Burglar picture book, it’s brilliant 🙂

    • Minerva
      January 18, 2015 at 11:49 am

      Thanks Rachael. I really want to read the new Ralfy Rabbit book. Was rather hoping Bloomsbury were winging one in the post to me, but otherwise I’ll pop to my local and buy a copy! You never know, it might be next week’s book of the week!

  3. Sharon
    January 18, 2015 at 9:27 am

    We also love Delilah Darling Is In The Library… Her interpretation of the English language always raises a giggle…

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