Messy Cats

I am a very Clever Cat by Kasia Matyjaszek

Bold and funny even on the cover, Kasia Matyjaszek introduces the idea (in her debut picture book) of making a confident claim and sticking to it. Stockton boasts that he is a very clever cat with huge emphasis on the word very. He shows the reader his many talents over the next few pages, but his main passion and gift is for knitting. Or so he claims. It turns out that Stockton is more ‘smart’ than clever, but he does possess some rather clever friends.

Matyjaszek not only plays on the idea of boastfulness, and perhaps misplaced self-belief – we cannot be good at everything – but also creates quite a riot of fun and hilarity in her portrayal of Stockton, and his two mice friends. Throughout the book Stockton tries to knit with his fluorescent pink wool, which weaves its way in and out of the pages, making quite a mess of his house. But at the end, a rather beautiful bright pink scarf adorns his neck.

The mice are great characters, ever present and ever jolly, more often than not doing their own immaculate knitting in the background. The illustrations match the craziness of the cat – a multitude of colours and patterns, dominated always by an overlaying of the luminous pink. Text is minimal, letting the illustrations tell the tale, but with an introduction of some sophisticated vocabulary and a play on the word ‘smart’. A fun yarn, humorous, lively and bright. Purchase Stockton here.

The Messy Book by Maudie Powell-Tuck, illustrated by Richard Smythe

Another smug cat on the cover who boasts of making a mess. His dog companion has more conscience and suggests tidying the mess (presented as a collage of colourful bits of paper, as if the cat has been participating in arts and crafts for a couple of weeks). As dog seems to become slightly more anxious at the state of the mess and cat’s nonchalant attitude to tidying, more and more animals join the melee and attempt to join the dog in insisting the cat moves his mess away from them. The cat, like some children I know, is more and more reluctant to tidy, until finally the dog insists. But the cat’s tidying still isn’t so much tidying as playing. Finally, it is tidy, so they have a party to celebrate, which results in more…mess.

A book that will resonate with any parent who has remonstrated with a child to tidy up the mess they’ve made, and a book to encourage thinking about whether making a mess is worth the consequences, and that in the end it probably is, as long as each person helps to tidy up after themselves.

With funny animal expressions, and a heap of colourful scraps on each page, this is a likeable picture book with a cute message. Grab your own mess here.

Stanley the Amazing Knitting Cat by Emily MacKenzie

After Emily made a big splash with Wanted: Ralfie Rabbit Book Burglar, she wrote about Stanley. I have a feeling that Stanley could teach Stockton a thing or two. He doesn’t just think he can knit, he actually can. What’s lovely about Stanley is that he knits for all his friends – balaclavas for bunnies, even trunk tubes for the elephants.

But then he spies a competition for woolly creations (reminiscent of The Great Paper Caper by Oliver Jeffers, and Grrrrr! by Rob Biddulph, both of which also feature competitions and friendship), and he starts to knit in earnest. When Stanley runs out of wool for his grand creation, he has no option but to unravel all the knitting he’s done for his friends – leaving them cold and bare in the Great Unravelling.

Although, of course, there’s a happy ending in sight.

This story is packed with the vibrancy of knitting colours – as if MacKenzie has robbed the haberdashery department in John Lewis. Every page feels energetic, both with the liveliness of the animals, but also the vivacity of the colour palette. This is a bright book. The unravelling is illustrated as a scribble of colour – like the most intense jumble of lines in a children’s activity book in which you have to match each squiggly line to the correct object.

But the message behind is simple to detangle. Stanley strives to be the best at something, ignoring all else in his determination, but learns in the end that sharing his success and his skill with his friends is what makes him, and everyone else, happiest.

MacKenzie handles her yarn with humour and energy, the colour of her illustrations matching the pace and tempo of the book. You can buy a copy here.