Pieces of Eight

What do you want to be when you grow up? It’s a question children ask themselves a great deal – I discussed it with some Year 1s recently. Many of them wanted to be teachers (they must have great role models), and none wanted to be librarians. (I am working on this!) Some wanted to be pirates. Although I don’t condone criminal behaviour, it was an opportunity to discuss what sort of person could be a pirate, which skills they would need, and most importantly what would pirates wear, and eat?

flinn

Captain Flinn and the Pirate Dinosaurs by Giles Andreae and Russell Ayto
An old favourite of ours – even as an eight month old baby one of our children knew when the ‘roar’ was coming in the text. Flinn is an ordinary boy who falls into a world of dinosaurs and pirates through his school art cupboard. He takes his friends with him, and before long they are fighting on behalf of Captain Stubble to rescue his beloved ship from the roaring Pirate Dinosaurs. The humour that infuses this text makes it loveable and readable – from the cowardice of Captain Stubble to the references to dinosaurs liking tomato ketchup and a dual which lasts for precisely two hours and twenty-five minutes, exhausting the T-Rex. It is a flowing adventure story packed neatly into a picture book with phenomenally rendered illustrations of pirate ships, ferocious dinosaurs, and on the final pages, a typical school room with the gentle Miss Pie. A great mix of content that children of this age devour. You can buy it here or on the Amazon sidebar.

rufus goes to sea

Rufus Goes to Sea by Kim T Griswell, illustrated by Valerie Gorbachev
Can anyone be a pirate? Rufus, a young book-loving pig, inspired by adventure stories he reads, decides to be a pirate for his summer holiday. The stereotypical pirates on board the ship, including Captain Wibblyshins with his wooden leg, and First Mate Scratchwhiskers with his eye patch, have their doubts that a pig has the right skillset to be a pirate. Finally Rufus demonstrates his one very useful skill – the ability to read – not only books but treasure maps – and is accepted on board. Packed with pirate references from yardarms to crow’s nests, Jolly Rogers to quarter decks, this will not only invigorate your child’s seafaring vocabulary, but endear them to a little pink pig who is ruthless in pursuit of his own destiny. Perseverance and reading pay off! There’s a lovely twist at the end too – the treasure it not quite what you’d expect. A lovely little story from the US. Look out too for the very colourful, detailed illustrations. Buy it here from Waterstones, or click through to Amazon.

pirates in pyjamas

Pirates in Pyjamas by Caroline Crowe and Tom Knight
So pirates come in all shapes and sizes, and need to be able to read, but what do they wear? Caroline Crowe wonders what pirates wear when they sleep in this playful new rhyming picture book.  The book leads the reader rather merrily to bed, describing which pyjamas the pirates might wear, what they do in the bath (make shark fins with the shampoo in their hair), what a pirate pyjama party might look like, and how they finally get to sleep. The last rhyme is rather cute, for smaller pirates everywhere:
“So if you want to be a pirate,
you don’t need a patch or sword.
You just need your best pyjamas,
and a bed to climb aboard.”
The illustrations are touchingly sentimental – two young friends or siblings sharing a bedroom, decorated with pirate paraphernalia – even the teddy has an eye patch. The pirates come in all shapes and sizes – bearded, thin, fat, large and small, pale, dark, exotic, and with different facial expressions too – a source of wonder and excitement for little readers. It’s colourful and fun. This book publishes in mid August 2015. You can buy it here.

pizza for pirates

Pizza for Pirates by Adam and Charlotte Guillain, illustrated by Lee Wildish
Lastly, what pirates eat! Part of the ongoing picture book series about George, including Spaghetti with the Yeti and Marshmallows for Martians, the authors continue their foody adventures. George sets off armed with a pizza to win over a pirate crew. He takes some time to find the crew, firstly being swallowed by a whale, whose stomach contents suggest that it too has had dalliance with pirates, and then landing on an island. Along with a helpful parrot, George finally finds his pirate crew, digs up some treasure, and saves them from a sea monster (with the assistance of his now soggy pizza). Also, as above, using a bed to represent a boat, the authors have used home props to make the adventure familiar. George’s bedroom also has a teddy with an eye patch, pirate dress up props and some themed lamps and curtains. There is no end to the brightness here – mermaids, fish, cartoon crabs and starfish, and an ending that looks like the most terrific pool party. Lots to look at, I can imagine this being a firm bedtime favourite. You can buy it here or on the Amazon sidebar.

As I recently pointed out, much of our ‘pirate’ cultural heritage stems from Treasure Island. Stevenson’s inspiration for the story was a map drawn by a child, and ever since there have been a plethora of fictional references to treasure maps, x marking the spot, and dastardly pirates, all descended from the ever-lasting Long John Silver and his search for treasure. (Note: Robert Louis Stevenson first called the story The Sea Cook – one has to wonder if the story would have endured in the same way with this flat alternative title).