Robot Girl by Malorie Blackman, illustrated by Matthew Griffin

Robot Girl

Of course, I have nothing but praise for Malorie Blackman. She’s the children’s laureate, and clearly a wonderful writer. She was also given a gold Blue Peter badge earlier this year in recognition for inspiring children. Her latest book for Barrington Stoke is for those with a reading age of eight, but interest level stretches to 12 years. Actually, I’d argue with the publishers here – the novel works as a brilliant short story for adults too! Claire’s Dad works long hours in his lab, perfecting a project he has been working on for a long time. Claire feels neglected and confides her feelings by email with her friend, Maisie, who seems to be the only one who understands her. However, when Claire’s Dad reveals the project, it’s only the first of many surprises to come Claire’s way. This is a fantastic futuristic little tale full of twists and surprises, with fabulous clues dropped in, and beautiful illustrations to accompany the text – all set out in a dyslexia-friendly way. It asks powerful questions about who we are, what life would be like without feelings, and what it means to be truly alive. I hesitate to describe it more for want of giving away the suspenseful punchline. Masterly crafted, this would work as good fodder for classroom discussion on storytelling and questions of philosophy in secondary schools too. Fabulous.

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