Seasonal Books For Younger Readers Part 2

refuge

Refuge by Anne Booth and Sam Usher
If you’re only buying one Christmas book this year, make it this one (although the mind boggles as to why you’d just buy one!). Refuge is a charity book – £5 for every sale goes to War Child. It’s a partnership of two very special people in the children’s book industry – Anne Booth – a magical writer who manages to be continually altruistic whilst writing thought-provoking literature for children, and Sam Usher, whose beautiful illustrations light up my eyes.

Refuge tells the traditional Christmas story in a new way, highlighting very cleverly and simply the struggle faced by a family seeking refuge – a family who could be anyone –  not just people from biblical times. It particularly demonstrates the kindness of strangers who help them along their way, and then take them in. Told from the point of view of the donkey, he explains the generosity of the innkeeper, the harshness of the journey, and the final granting of refuge. Of course it draws attention to the particular nub of our time – refugees and homelessness, and questions our basic humanity.

The illustrations sing from the page – Usher has depicted the nativity seamlessly in pen and wash, but inserted a shrewd narrative device of light on each page to express hope and freedom and sanctuary.

It’s published by Nosy Crow publishers, who are kindly absorbing the cost. They are a fairly new publishing group, who shine with innovation and are proving to have oodles of integrity. Their books are always of the highest quality, and this book is no different, which makes it easy to support.

For all ages. You can buy it here from Waterstones, or in any good book shop.

Snow bear

Snow Bear by Tony Mitton and Alison Brown
A winsome rhyming tale with one of the cutest bears in picturebooks. Alison Brown’s bear is far more abstract and less traditional than most bears, a cute white ball of fluff with dots for eyes and a cylindrical shape, but endearing nevertheless. There is glitter on this cover, snowdrops in silver that will catch any shop’s lights – who can resist glitter at Christmas? The story is more wintry than strictly Christmas – it could appeal to any faith denomination.

The bear is cold and looking for warmth. The other animals can’t help, and then he finally stumbles across a house with warming features – a comfortable armchair, a roaring fire, and a small girl who needs a hug. There is no explanation for the girl’s loneliness or why the bear needs human kindness, but the illustrations show incredible tenderness between the two when they do finally meet – the girl reads to the bear, helps him climb the stairs, and wraps him up warmly. The book is about solving loneliness, finding friendship, and showing kindness. The rhyming works well, the vocabulary is lovely. But it is the atmosphere created that warms the heart – the cold blue winter turning to reds, oranges and purples inside. It makes the reader want to climb inside the book itself. Perfect for reading aloud with a cuddle. 3+yrs. Buy it here.

toothfairys christmas

The Tooth Fairy’s Christmas by Peter Bently, illustrated by Garry Parsons
It’s always great fun to bring together more than one childhood character – in this case a very cold tooth fairy seeks the assistance of Father Christmas so that she can pick up a tooth from a particular child on Christmas Eve. Not everything goes smoothly though, as Santa is a little clumsy and they very nearly wake the sleeping child.

Told in rhyme, this is a fun giggle:
“Thank you for helping me out in this weather!”
She said. “It was lots of fun working together!”

There are some beautiful touches from both author and illustrator, the tooth fairy’s lounge is beautifully decorated – with Christmas tree and stocking – but alongside the seasonal touches are the numerous portraits on the wall of gappy smiles! In this story the tooth fairy doesn’t like the cold, and the wind whirls up her knickers, whereas Santa’s bottom gets stuck in the child’s window. I love the pages in which Santa’s huge face takes over the entire page, and the daintiness with which he tries to leave the tooth fairy her own Christmas present. A real joy to read. You can purchase it here.

fairytale hairdresser and father christmas
The Fairytale Hairdresser and Father Christmas by Abi Longstaff and Lauren Beard
Another not entirely new book (published last year), but part of the fun series about Kittie Lacey, the Fairytale Hairdresser, that likes to splash with the glitter whatever the time of year. Like every other hairdresser, Kittie’s busiest time is Christmas. When she makes a home visit to Father Christmas to trim his beard and tend to all the elves, she discovers the Snow Queen has stolen all the presents.

Together with her hairdryer (isn’t it amazing what hairdryers can do?), and Father Christmas, Kitty melts the Snow Queen’s heart and they all deliver the presents together.

Some hilarious illustrations make this a sure-fire winner – look carefully for the page on which The Snow Queen tries different outfits for the party (the onesie is great), and the presents all the fairytale characters receive for Christmas (particularly Snow White’s). A lovely Christmas book (and Lauren Beard has even drawn in Father Christmas’ utility room). Fun indeed. You can buy it here.