Seeing Shadows

shadowMy Year 6 bookclub always look surprised when I tell them it is picture book week. As if, I explain, they haven’t heard me extolling the use of picture books for all ages every day! This week I’ll introduce them to Shadow by Lucy Christopher, illustrated by Anastasia Suvorova – just as I am to you.

This exquisitely subtle picture book shows us a young girl and her mother moving into a new house. It’s formidable and stark, all angles and shadows, so really should come as no surprise to the seemingly reluctant girl that she finds a shadow under her bed. But Shadow isn’t menacing. Shadow is Peter Pan-esque, fun and companionable; this shape-shifting piece of darkness comes as friend, complete with rosy cheeks to match the girl. But the child’s mother can’t see Shadow. In fact, her mother seems at first preoccupied, and then just sad and unseeing – her eyes heavily lidded and shown in shadow.

When the girl and Shadow go to the forest, Shadow disappears and the girl is left alone. Until a familiar voice comes through the darkness…

The prose is simple and light, brief and active, with a wonderful momentum.

This atmospheric picture book could be an allegory about pushing through a childhood whilst living with a parent’s depression, or it could merely be a generic everyman story about coming through loss and darkness into a new world of captured happiness – for yes, there is a happy ending. In fact, the loss of Shadow in the forest is replaced by the dual togetherness of the mother and daughter shadows stretching from their hand-in-hand silhouettes. Returning home from the forest, their new house transitions from one of spectral isolation to one embedded within a whole village, with familiarity and warmth bleeding through the pages. The illustrations turn from dark greys and moody whites, distinctive and atmospheric, to ones toasted with a heat of yellows and intense reds, with an influx of people.

There’s much to read into these illustrations – from the white scratchings aross the page of the early images, as if light is attempting to get through and failing, to the bright redness of the girl’s hair and cheeks and dungarees – a lightness in the face of dark. But even she is tinged with sadness – her eyes perpetually slightly vacant, slightly sad – more noticeable when contrasted with the absolute delight depicted on her face in the later pages when her eyes, fascinatingly enough, are closed in happiness.

However children read into this picture book, whether as being about attention received, about overcoming loneliness and anxiety, depression and loss, they will be able to create a backstory to the characters, and see that in the end darkness and despair are driven out by human interaction and togetherness.

Below, Lucy Christopher explains the genesis to Shadow:

In my debut picture book story, Shadow, a lonely young child moves into a new house where she finds a shadow under the bed who she makes friends with. Together they make mischief and run away, only to be found again by Mum. It’s a story about loneliness and sadness and how this might manifest itself in the very young. Ultimately it’s a story of an awareness of darkness – and shadows – and of coming together.

I was lonely as a child. By the time I was five years old, I had lived in three countries and five houses. My parents had divorced, and my dad now lived thousands of miles across the world. I was beginning my second school, this time in a small country town in South Wales, and living with my single mother and grandmother. I had no siblings and no friends.

On one level it’s easy to see a connection between the child in Shadow and me as a young girl. The feelings of being alone, moving to a new house, and making my own mischief were things I readily understood. I had many imaginary friends, many of them dogs and cats and horses. I spent hours imagining and drawing a huge stable yard of ponies – each one with personality inventories, lovingly drawn tack wardrobes, and a growing list of skillsets. I lived almost entirely in my imagination.

As soon as I could write, I did. I wrote constantly – letters back to my Dad in Australia, or to my family in other parts of the world, letters to friends when I went on holiday. When I was nine, and we did it all again – this time moving back to Australia – my letter writing intensified. I bought notebooks and filled them, sending them back to my family or friends in whatever country I wasn’t in at the time – sometimes my letters would stretch over whole 250-page A5 notebooks. As I grew up in Australia, I became more serious about my own stories, too. My gifts to favourite teachers were stories I had written about them. I wrote to authors I admired. And then, gradually, I began to enter, and sometimes even win, short story competitions. More and more, I started to define myself through the words I wrote.

There’s no denying that aspects of my childhood were hard at times – living in four countries and a dozen houses by the time I hit eighteen has got to have an impact – but these experiences were also massive contributors to what made me a writer, most especially, a writer for young people. I’ve no doubt that my creativity, and my writing skills, are intricately connected to my feelings of loneliness as a child. All my novels have aspects of me inside them, but in some ways Shadow is my most personal story. Shadow came from a place I knew extremely well, and it wouldn’t exist without my history. The little girl in the story isn’t me, and I didn’t find an actual shadow to play with under the bed of one of my many new houses (oh, but how much fun I would have had if I did!), but her journey in the story is also my journey in life.

I do hope though that there are other young children out there who may recognise some of the feelings and themes within the story, and that they may take something from this story. I hope that Shadow will be a book that parents and children can share together. I hope it will offer a chance for discussion about aspects of loneliness and sadness, and how it’s possible to overcome these things through a stronger emphasis on connection.

With thanks to Lucy Christopher for her guest blog post, and to Lantana Publishing for the review copy. Shadow is available in good UK, US, Can and Aus bookshops, or you can purchase it direct from Lantana publishing

For every book purchased from the Lantana website, they will donate a book to children’s hospitals in the UK.

Follow the rest of the blogtour here.