Sportopedia by Adam Skinner, Illustrated by Mark Long

sportopediaWhen I play trivial pursuit, it’s always the orange wedge I find hardest to win. Orange – sport and leisure. And when I look at the ‘sports shelf’ in my library, I can see our range of football books, a few on gymnastics and some lesser known sports, but there’s rarely an all-encompassing encyclopaedia of sport. Until now.

Sportopedia is going to fill that void and help me win the orange wedge. Featuring more than 60 sports, this is an enjoyable, knowledgeable introduction to sports that is well-organised and easy on the eye.

Split into logical sections – ball sports, racket sports, athletics, water sports and so on – each sport is afforded a single or double page spread with an introduction, a large illustration showing the sport, and then some standard ‘boxes-off’, which highlight the basic rules of the sport, as well as engaging facts. For Diving, facts include the depth of a diving pool and when diving became part of the Olympic Games. For other sports, author Adam Skinner documents famous incidents in sport and celebrates record-breakers.

But there are also quirks. In Diving, there is a section on cliff diving. And in Long-Distance Running, there is a segment on ultra-runners, which made me realise that my measly 8K is no achievement in comparison to Serge Girard’s 27,011 km in 365 consecutive days.

Long’s illustrations really lift the book – it wouldn’t have made sense to choose specific photographs from the millions that exist, and the illustrations strike a perfect balance between showing humour and illustrating the sport. They are also sumptuously bright, with a heavy leaning towards the primary palette, which gives the book a feeling of simplicity and ease. Although, I’m a little concerned that none of the long distance runners look as if they’re enjoying themselves, (the gymnasts certainly are).

Many of the sports highlighted are accompanied by an infographic that lends authority to the book, whether it be illuminating the areas of a tennis court or the scores of a dart board. There is also mention of kit, and how names of sports, and entrants to sports, have changed over the years. What’s particularly pleasing, and necessary of course, is the diversity of all the competitors illustrated and celebrated – male, female, from many ethnicities, able-bodied and Paralympians.

The ‘winter sports’ are considered in the four pages devoted to The Winter Olympics towards the back of the book in the chapter titled ‘Sporting Events’, with skiing, curling and skating among others, but there is less detail about these.

But I think my favourite piece is the introduction. Explaining that sports have always existed, and that competition is part of human life and that anybody can take part. As well as talking about the lack of discrimination exercised by sport, the introduction also explains the benefits of sport – not just in the winning, but the importance of physical well-being, teamwork and discipline. And how big a part sport plays in human history. This is a fabulous book, introducing less active children to sport, promoting the rules and facts of each sport for trivia seekers, and tracking leading figures and sports milestones for enthusiasts.

I might not be able to run for 365 consecutive days, but I know more about Archery and Kabaddi than I did yesterday. You can buy it here.