Tag Archive for Antony Steve

Christmas Round Up

It’s nearly Christmas. Bring out the bells and lights, decorate the tree. Here are some new Christmas-themed book delights to wrap up for the big day. Click on the book title for a link to buy. Click here for my non-Christmas themed holiday gift selection.

queen-present

A red and green foiled cover with a host of elves is a magical way to start the Christmas season. Steve Antony’s The Queen’s Present, complete with the Queen in Santa’s sleigh on the front cover, is a magical delight of a book. Familiarly set out as the other books in the series, this one traverses the world as the Queen seeks presents for the little princes and princess. Flying through Paris, Pisa, Egypt, Japan and New York to name but a few, the book is illustrated with thousands of elves carrying presents across famous landmarks. The colour palette is restricted to Christmassy green and red, with Steve Antony’s famous massively populated spreads showing characters from previous books, and elves up to all sorts of mischief. Of course, the moral of the story is that time with family members is the biggest present of all. But this book would bring a big smile too! Fabulous Christmas entertainment.

santa-magic-key

For those worried that Santa won’t visit them because they don’t have a chimney, Little Tiger Press have come up with the perfect solution. Santa’s Magic Key by Emi Ordas and Stephanie Stansbie is a book in a box complete with golden key (a fairly sturdy piece, no plastic rubbish here). A cute story book inside explains the significance of the magic key, enabling Santa to visit even when there’s no clear access – this is one to gift to the children before Christmas Day.

nightmare-before-xmas

If you associate Christmas with watching films, then this precursor to the film might be for you. The Nightmare Before Christmas, written and illustrated by the famous Tim Burton is a brilliant accompaniment for all fans of the film, and newbies too. Containing exclusive original sketches, this is for those who want a bit of a fright with their Christmas pudding. Macabre and witty, don’t miss out.

blue-penguinonce-upon-a-northern

More gentle, and more whimsical is Blue Penguin by Petr Horacek. A beautiful tale about friendship and finding your own voice, Petr’s illustrations linger in the imagination, evoking an icy blue and green wonderland of the South Pole. The children adored this tale of belonging, which evokes strong emotions through its enchanting illustrations. The tone is one of muted sadness, a kind of dream landscape that has a happy ending but will leave the reader thinking. Once Upon a Northern Night by Jean E Pendziwol and Isabelle Arsenault is a poetic lullaby, a paean to the land of wild animals, snowfall, and the northern lights. Another one in which the illustrations evoke a certain sadness or stillness, the beauty of wintry nature and the feeling of being lulled softly to sleep in a warm bed. Sensational use of language, and stunning use of illustration.

cat-who-ate-christmas

A totally different feel with The Cat Who Ate Christmas by Lil Chase and Thomas Docherty, this is a book for newly independent readers, based on a real naughty kitten. A charming story, with a fun family and a mischievous cat called Jingles, this chapter book is packed with large exquisite two-tone illustrations showing the wonderful family atmosphere at Christmas time (even if the cat makes it a little haphazard). It’s good to see diversity represented in this family, and a host of activities at the end of the book, including crafts, cooking, facts and jokes. Top choice for this age group. 5+ years.

mistletoe-and-murder

I’ve mentioned her before, but Robin Stevens definitely has the magic touch. Her Murder Most Unladylike Series (think Enid Blyton crossed with Agatha Christie) keeps getting better and better, and this Christmas themed title is no exception. Mistletoe and Murder by Robin Stevens sets detectives Daisy Wells and Hazel Wong a new mystery but also a deadline – when a brutal accident occurs two days before Christmas, the detectives suspect murder, but they must solve the crime before Christmas morning. Set in a beautiful snowy Cambridge, with tales of sumptuous teas, ornate buildings, and some roof climbing, this is pure joy. Hazel Wong’s narrative is emotionally astute and easy to read. Stevens manages to add her usual twists and turns, and her effortless mentions of food (this book makes you long for mince pies as well as bunbreaks). She also incorporates a darker side in this title when she touches on what it’s like to feel like an outsider in British society. With lashings of boy crushes, a hint of feminism, and perfectly exquisite 1930’s student language, this is one to be savoured with an extra helping of Christmas cake.

Check out my books of the week in November and December for other wintry reads, including The Christmasaurus and to come at the weekend, a rather special book called Winter Magic.

 

 

 

Top Ten(ish) Books Published 2015

I’m not convinced on the end of year lists thing. MinervaReads raison d’etre being that one list of ten books would not suit any two children – different books suit different children. However, this being the time of year when we all go crazy and make top ten lists of absolutely everything, here are the top ten children’s books of MINE for 2015 – simply the books I most enjoyed reading (for review purposes). And by the way, this was ridiculously tricky (which is why I kind of cheated and mentioned 16).

bear on chairplease mr pandaBear and the Piano

There’s a Bear on My Chair by Ross Collins
I first saw a copy of this book pre-publication in April when a sample was thrust upon me at a conference. I agreed with the publisher that this was bound to be a hit and subsequently reviewed on publication in June. For me, I like picture books that, as a parent, you are happy to read over and over – as that’s what a child demands. I also like inference – when you have to work out a bit of the story for yourself – and illustrations that elicit a wry smile or an outright guffaw. The text is reminiscent of Dr Seuss, the pictures humorous and warm. This ticked all the boxes and it’s my picture book of the year. A small mention to Please Mr Panda – which just crept into 2015 books, and is probably my joint favourite – Steve Antony is proving to be a master of his trade – and the panda is one of my favourite modern picture book characters, demanding politeness from children in the simplest yet most exquisite way. I can’t wait for him to demand patience from them, as he will be doing in 2016 with I’ll Wait, Mr Panda. One other picture book I’d recommend as a startling debut and one to not be missed from the 2015 publications list is The Bear and the Piano by David Litchfield. The messages within the story, and the way the illustrations capture light, make this a totally exquisite book.

tree

Tree by Britta Teekentrup and Patricia Hegarty
Non-fiction is being packaged more and more effectively by clever children’s publishers, and for me Tree stood out as one of the best cross-overs between fiction and non-fiction this year. The text is poetic (it also rhymes) and fictional – but through its illustrations, Tree shows the changing of the seasons, making clever use of die-cuts so that the reader can see inside the tree too. The colour palate in this book is a treasure in itself – as the same tree morphs from season to season – the leaves, creatures and surrounding atmosphere changing, the basic trunk stays the same. This was a book that was pounced on by all children as soon as they saw it, and held wonders within.

the school of art

School of Art by Teal Triggs, illustrated by Daniel Frost
This features as my non-fiction title of the year, as never has a book managed to explain complicated concepts and high-art techniques and subjects to me in such a simple way. Knowing nothing about the subject, I came to this as a child would and was entranced with the wonderful explanations – the introduction of professors who taught different knowledge bases, and the fantastic examples and try-it-at-home sequences – all of which worked exceptionally well. The design of the book was different too – clean, tidy and neatly colourful. In my initial review I found some of the text quite dense, but actually have since dipped in and out very successfully, and love that the book is so comprehensive. A rich overarching story within which the separate sections operate well on their own or as part of a whole. The book imparts great knowledge.

completely cassidy

Completely Cassidy: Accidental Genius by Tamsyn Murray
I have to admit, many books purporting to tell a story from a 9-13 year old contemporary girl’s point of view about her family/friends/school/boys, crop up on my radar. This one stood out for me because I simply couldn’t put it down. Cassidy rang so true, her character was so alive – I demolished this book in a sitting and was laughing out loud. With random doodles, fun graphics and capital letters, this was the most fun I had reading this year.

Mango and Bambang

Mango and Bambang by Polly Faber and Clara Vulliamy
This is the year for me in which illustrated stories piqued the attention like no other category within children’s books – from the phenomenal duo of Philip Reeve and Sarah Macintyre with Pugs of the Frozen North to Squishy McFluff by Pip Jones and Ella Okstad , to Dave McKean’s Illustrations of Phoenix by SF Said, to the ongoing success of Claude by Alex T Smith and Tom Gates by Liz Pichon, and of course our children’s laureate’s wonderful Ottoline. However, Mango and Bambang was like a breath of fresh air in the genre – a tidal wave of happiness – with its two tone colour perfection – its stripes, its worldly setting, its characters. This first book contains four individual stories about a girl who discovers a lost tapir. It is gentle, yet alluring.

untitled

Stonebird by Mike Revell
Although published early in 2015, and one of the first books I reviewed, this story still sticks fast in my memory – its poignant storytelling with a touch of magic about a boy who moves house, so that his mother can be nearer his grandmother who suffers from dementia, both engages and enthralls. The book deals sensitively with the consequences of the move, including the bullying Liam experiences at his new school, as well as the effect on his mother. Liam overcomes some of his problems by seeking the help of responsible grown-ups, and using the magic of storytelling. It deserves to be in every school library, and I hope for more from this author. Later in the year, reading In Darkling Wood by Emma Carroll, I was also smitten with a protagonist dealing with the fallout from illness in the family, and some magic in the surroundings – both these titles, for age 9+ yrs struck me as being brilliantly evocative.

An Island Of Our Own

An Island Of Our Own by Sally Nicholls
I was gearing up to interview Sally Nichols for #YASHot in September (although this didn’t quite happen as Sally had her baby – congrats!) but in preparation I read all of Sally’s books. This one stands out for several reasons. Beautifully short chapters that enable even the most reluctant reader to sample small delectable portions of Sally’s writing, and wonderful characterisation – Sally definitely wins the Oscar for Best Supporting Cast, as her secondary characters are so wonderfully defined I know I’m not the only reviewer to have fallen for Jonathan, the protagonist’s big brother. She also weaves a neat mystery plot. Sally incorporates great use of setting from the flat the children live in, to the island they visit, as well as introducing exciting extra information into her books, in this one, the MakerSpace organisation. A great book.

demolition dad

Demolition Dad by Phil Earle, illustrated by Sara Ogilvie
Phil Earle has been writing for a while, but mainly for slightly older children, so it was a blessing that he decided to reach down the age ladder slightly with this terrifically funny, yet also poignant, well-crafted novel. A great plot, sense of community, carefully dealt with emotion, an insight into father/son relationships – this book has so much. The humour is intensified by Phil’s self-referential jokes, as well as Sara Ogilvie’s amazing illustrations. A gem (and also more to come focussing on the same community next year).

The Dreamsnatcher cover FINAL

The Dreamsnatcher by Abi Elphinstone
Another book I stumbled across pre-publication, and adored. Dark fantasy with such dense imagery, but led by a forcefield in the shape of Moll, our protagonist. Brave, feisty, impetuous, like a younger contemporary Northern Lights Lyra mixed with the determination of Sara Crewe from A Little Princess, and Wonderland Alice’s curiosity, and Elphinstone has drawn quite a heroine. With the darkest prologue I’ve read for a while (I like dark), and a vigorous plot, this was an influential read. Looking forward to reviewing the sequel The Shadow Keeper next year (with some more deliciously dark scenes from Abi Elphinstone’s wild imagination).

The Boy Who Drew the Future

The Boy Who Drew the Future by Rhian Ivory
This was such an enjoyable read, it was another I consumed in a day. Told from a dual narrative point of view, one set historically, the contemporary, the themes and settings danced between the two – Ivory cleverly dropping clues in each to build to a dramatic climax. The characters were intensely loveable, there was clear anguish and conflict, and some brilliantly spooky coincidences. Simple, compelling storytelling.

OneRailhead

Young Teens
Two books that stood out for me in the highest age range I cater for, were One by Sarah Crossan, and Railhead by Philip Reeve. The former for Crossan’s stunning use of free verse to tell her story of conjoined twins – packed with beautiful memorable language, and strung with emotion. The latter for its uncompromising science fiction world-building, to the extent that the reader is pulled in without any misgiving. Intriguing characters, tense, grotesque (I will never forget the hive monks), exciting, scintillating – and the sort of book you wouldn’t just thrust upon your young teen, but also share with all the grown-ups too.

Wolf Wilder

Lastly, (I know I’m already well over ten), my award for most stunning writing goes to Katherine Rundell. I imagine her as a kind of Elsa from Frozen – words flung from her fingertips onto the page with magnificent magical majesty, just as ice flies from Elsa’s fingertips. She writes with meticulous precision – every word well placed, every phrase constructed like dainty decorations on a wedding cake. It is clear, crisp, attractive, easy to read, and highly perceptive.

Long before publication of her 2015 novel, The Wolf Wilder, the enchantment of the first line was on everyone’s lips “Once upon a time, a hundred years ago, there was a dark and stormy girl” and the images of the snowy landscape, the descriptions of the soldiers, the telling of the life of the wolves suck the reader into the story. I can’t wait to see what’s next.

Green Lizards vs Red Rectangles by Steve Antony

green lizards

I make no apologies for featuring two books by Steve Antony in one week. He burst onto the children’s picture book scene less than two years ago with The Queen’s Hat, and has been prolific since. (Last week’s blog featured The Queen’s Handbag). Green Lizards and Red Rectangles takes trademark Antony’s detailed drawings a step further. Soldiers and police officers dominated the earlier titles, this book features a colossal number of green lizards, each in a different position with a different expression. However, as the title implies, these are not passive lizards – they are in a big fight against the red rectangles. This is a fantastically clever book about conflict.

The book illustrates a war between the two factions, each page shows them fighting. When one green lizard asks what they are fighting for, he is promptly squashed by a red rectangle. Steve Antony cleverly depicts the futility of war – rectangles are inanimate objects.

The colours are well chosen – they stand out in direct contrast to each other. The page in which Antony describes the red rectangles as being smart is particularly clever. The lizards have pushed over a red rectangle, and more are toppling, but as the reader traces round the page, they discover the domino effect – in the end the last tall rectangle will fall on the lizards, crushing them.

The page in which the green lizards demonstrate their strength in numbers, managing to push back the red rectangles, is also witty and astute. Not all the lizards appear to be as gung-ho as the others – take a good look at their body posture and expressions.

When the war turns particularly bad in the middle of the book, the rectangles and lizards take to fighting each other individually. Again, there is much to notice on these pages – spot the ninja lizard, and the injured one.

There is resolution at the end though. Firstly, Antony correctly shows conflict as being exhausting – and then when a truce is called, the arrangement at the end is rather effective. Rather than resolving the fight by homogenising the differences between the two, Antony shows that the two sides may have stark differences, but they can live side by side – in a surprising way.

I noticed that the book is dedicated to Antony’s three brothers – perhaps the book shows not just the futility of war, but resolutions for sibling conflict – something about which young children are only too aware. You can buy a copy here.

Picture Book Sequels

max at night

Max at Night by Ed Vere
One of my favourite children’s illustrators, Ed Vere published Max the Brave in 2014. The story of a small kitten who is brave, if a little lacking in knowledge, was a huge success. Max at Night revisits Max, with nods to childhood favourite ‘Goodnight, Moon’, but with a sparkling twinkle of modernity in attitude and text. Vere is part of a cohort of modern children’s illustrators who opt for minimalism and yet succeed in making their characters both extraordinarily empathetic and expressive.

Max at Night is Max’s search for the moon so that he can say goodnight to it before he goes to bed. Anyone with young children will recognise the stalling of bedtime, with just one more task to be completed before bed – be it one drink, another story, or finding a toy. In Max’s case he needs to find the moon to say goodnight – and being the brave kitten that he is, will go to extreme effort to do so.

The colour palate of this latest picture book works well. There is a dark tone throughout the book, nodding to nighttime, with Max’s huge yellow eyes standing out against the background. The night sky shifts from a beautiful red to dark tones of blue and purple and nearly black, with the lovely orange and yellow of the inside of the house. Max’s huge eyes are adorable, the stark yellow – in contrast to the background of ‘night’ in all its forms- in shades of blue and red.

Max’s marvellous personality is apparent – his bravery comes through in this book, as does his determination, and his frustration when he screws his eyes up tightly and yells into the night. His exasperation:

“Now you tell me!”, when the moon explains he can hear Max from his bed, is both funny, and pitch perfect because it is the type of dialogue a youngster would pick up from his parent. There is wit apparent in the illustrations too as Max climbs “gracefully” over the sleeping dog.

Very attractive, very witty, very wise. A successful sequel. You can buy it here.

queens handbag

The Queen’s Handbag by Steve Antony
Another storming success in 2014 was Steve Antony’s The Queen’s Hat. Steve’s debut was shortlisted for the Waterstone’s Children’s Book Prize and has become a fine staple in any children’s library. The children in my library have an enormous soft spot for Please Mr Panda, which is in constant demand. However, this sequel about the Queen and her handbag will be a hot contender.

The Queen’s Hat looked at the London landmarks. The Queen’s Handbag features landmarks around the United Kingdom in trademark red, white and blue colours. When a swan steals her handbag from her arm, the Queen chases round the country looking for it, accompanied this time by blue policemen and policewomen rather than red guards. In a similar vein, Antony has gone to town on the detail, with swarms of the police, each with different apparel and expression.

The Queen’s modes of transport are spectacularly funny and enjoyable, from her red convertible, to her red motorbike, followed by the red arrows, her extraordinary bicycle, speedboat, train and horse. There’s even a union jack parachute – James Bond watch out.

Neat touches abound – from the policemen and women taking selfies on Snowdonia, to the policeman paddling his feet off the Giant’s Causeway, to the self-referential Mr Panda running in the London marathon. See if you can spot the policeman whose union jack boxer shorts are revealed when he loses his trousers!

There is so much to look at on each spread, and as one fellow reviewer said about The Queen’s Hat – it’d be a delight to have one of these pictures as a piece of artwork hanging on the wall. I’d like the London skyline – a muted pencil drawn backdrop behind the lamppost – as if London was drenched in a beautiful purple evening mist with a single lamppost standing out in the foreground.

Even the last page has a funny last line, and of course the endpapers are to be marvelled at. Rows and rows of policemen and women (plus a couple of other things dotted around too). A hugely successful sequel. Steve Antony’s website has a fun activity with 20 Things to Spot in the book. Visit it here., and buy the book here.

one thing

Lastly, a quick mention to One Thing by Lauren Child. A new Charlie and Lola book for those that follow them, this reviewer actually thought it was the best yet. The voices and thoughts of Lola and Charlie seem more authentic, more drawn from real life. The premise is well thought out. Lauren Child introduces numbers and the concept of time to Lola and her readers.

Charlie and Lola take a trip to the shops to buy just one thing – Charlie has to question his Mum to see if it’s one thing each, or one thing shared. Then there is basic addition as Charlie and Lola add up how many minutes it takes to get ready, as well as counting the animals they encounter on the way to the shops.

The cleverness lies in Lauren Child’s dismemberment of the concept of time. Lola has to do something before she leaves – saying she will be “half of a second”, and Mum says they are “leaving in one minute”, neither of which turns out to be correct of course, as these are common phrases rather than accurate times.

Child also wittily includes Lola’s bargaining with her mother and with Charlie, firstly over the number of things she can buy – compromising on one – and secondly over sharing Charlie’s badges with him – again settling for one.

Sums and numbers fall from the pages in an enticing way, the concept of time and numbers are wonderfully extrapolated. It goes on a little too long for my liking, but overall a great addition to the Charlie and Lola collection. Buy it here.