Tag Archive for Carroll Emma

Winter Magic curated by Abi Elphinstone

winter-magic

Since the publication of the Mystery and Mayhem (Crime Club) children’s stories anthology, I’ve been looking for another book of short stories for children that really hits the mark in the same way. Luckily Simon and Schuster publishers, together with the esteemed children’s author Abi Elphinstone, have crafted a truly marvellous collection in time for Christmas.

The collection is magical in many ways, firstly of course, because it is packed with wintry stories, bound in the most beautiful egg blue fabric cover, complete with snowflakes and wintry trees, so that it feels like a Christmas gift, but also because the stories themselves are penned by a distinguished group of children’s authors, from Michelle Magorian – author of Goodnight Mister Tom, to Lauren St John, Berlie Doherty, Geraldine McCaughrean…and so many more.

The anthology kicks off with Emma Carroll’s beautiful historical tale of a Victorian frost fair, incorporating some magical realism, and a beautiful frozen Thames river. Carroll’s writing is always transportative, easily leading the reader into the past and creating a swirling atmosphere of bustle and intrigue. It’s a short story that’s both perfect escapism but also brilliant for teaching – and a wonderful start to the book.

Michelle Harrison takes inspiration from her longer novel, The Other Alice, to write a fairy tale about a stolen voice. Harrison has an immense talent for weaving an emotive atmosphere in the shortest passages, leaving the reader tingling with a sense of magic.

Woodfine borrows from a ballet long associated with the time of year – The Nutcracker, which has its own connotations of darkness and light, sugar plums and Christmas gifts. Marvellously, she evokes the warmth and nostalgia of Christmas, using a Russian setting to take the reader back in history to the first performance of the ballet. It’s a lovely tale, and well worth re-reading with the same zeal with which one re-watches the ballet each year.

Further in, there’s a beautiful poem about snow by Magorian, which pictures a child looking out onto a snowy landscape. Pure childhood delight.

In between there are tales of sneasles: a magical tale of the outbreak of snow measles involving elves; a brilliant boarding-school adventure from Lauren St John; new twists on The Snow Queen and Pied Piper; and a cautionary tale from Piers Torday about Christmas wishes and gifts.

Elphinstone herself brings up the rear with her usual affinity for bravery in the face of adventure, with a magical tale about a snow dragon.

Although there is a winter theme running through the collection, each author has their own unique style and imagination, so the reader really gets a feel for their writing as a whole. In this way, it’s a great sampler for each author, leading the reader to explore more books from the stories they most enjoyed. Personally, I couldn’t pick a favourite – this is a wonderful collection from a talented bunch.

The stories are for confident readers, but for this family time of year, they are also perfect as bitesize chunks to read aloud to a young family. My other delight about bringing together talent in this way, is for teachers to be able to teach a full story text, rather than just an extract. Many of the stories within this collection lend themselves to that.

There are eleven stories in all, each one perfectly crafted, each one a great taster for its author. The overall feel is one of snowy landscapes, magical witches, wishes and wolves, with families, fairies and fireside glows.

Featuring stories by Michelle Harrison, Piers Torday, Lauren St John, Amy Alward, Katherine Woodfine, Geraldine McCaughrean, Berlie Doherty, Jamila Gavin, Michelle Magorian, Emma Carroll, Abi Elphinstone.

You can buy it here.

All the Fun of the Fair, and Circus too

Bright and loud, brash and fun, circuses and funfairs are excellent places to set a children’s book.

samson-the-mighty-flea
Samson the Mighty Flea! By Angela McAllister and Nathan Reed

Flea circuses started in the early 19th century, when an Italian impresario advertised an ‘extraordinary exhibition of industrious fleas’.

Samson is quite possibly the most extraordinary, but also warmest and friendliest looking flea we have ever seen. He is the big star of Fleabag’s Circus and shows his prowess to the somewhat strange crowd of colourful insects by lifting such heavy items as peas and matches, as well as hoisting his colleague, Amelie. But this smallest strongman dreams of being an even bigger star and sets off to make his fortune.

When Samson leaves his circus to join the big wide world, he finds out just how big it is. (Perception is everything.) When he joins The Circus of Dreams, he performs his act aloft the head of the Mighty Moustachio, to rapturous applause – deluding himself that the adulation is for him.

Combining a touching flea love story (don’t start scratching) with a message about being happy with what you have, and understanding that being a big star is all about your audience, this is a book that bursts with colour, enthusiasm and humour.

Told in rhyming verse that’s slightly reminiscent of the Ugly Bug Ball, this is a book with a heart. The story contains a plethora of insects and a zingy rhyme, as well as occasional moments of pathos.

The illustrations merge a circus with the insect world brilliantly – the insects’ antennae portrayed as bobbling dress-up hairbands, our protagonist flea wearing armbands to match his shorts, while his girlfriend Amelie wears a pink ra-ra skirt, pink glasses, and shows off her pink hair fuzz.

This is a vibrant picture book that is a joy to read aloud, and contains much within for discussion. A heart-warming tale about keeping perspective and seeing how your friends perceive you. We particularly loved the bravery of the lady flea left behind. Most tellingly, in a house fit to bursting with new picture books, this one has been declared a new favourite. A showstopper indeed. For ages 5+ years. You can buy it here.

jinks-and-ohare

Jinks and O’Hare Funfair Repair by Philip Reeve and Sarah McIntyre

Another successful collaboration from Reeve and McIntyre, following Cakes in Space, Oliver and the Seawigs, and Pugs of the Frozen North. This one allows Reeve to go even further in his excellent world-building, fabricating a universe filled with planets, such as Funfair Moon, in which the book’s action is set, and OfficeWorld with its Water Cooler Flume Ride, opening hours 9-5 of course.

Emily is a girl engineer, who hangs out with the funfair fixers – Jinks and O’Hare – for enjoyment, and in the hope of becoming their apprentice. Jinks and O’Hare are excellent at their job, but when a safety inspector turns up, there is a horrible coincidental breakdown of rides resulting in terrible catastrophes, ranging from a fudgeplosion to a serious gravity inversion on the helter-skelter.

Emily is on the case to solve the mystery of why the rides keep breaking down, and what the strange ‘rustlers’ are doing in the funfair.

This is zany storytelling at its very best. Inventive, witty and engaging, Reeve and McIntyre work together like rhubarb and custard. There are Miss Haversham-esque dining table allusions in the ghost train, Star Wars and Alien witticisms throughout – both in text and illustration.

The observant reader will spot many hilarious incidents, and much attention to detail, from the illustrations of a mermaid with coffee cup and mobile phone to the self-referential newspaper, the innovative vocabulary, and the allusions to prior books (pugs).

But even if the reader isn’t aware of the allusions, the book remains a fun, madcap caper with loads to look at, with a great adventure and a stellar example of how to let loose with the imagination. An absurd treat of a rollercoaster ride. For ages 7+ years. You can purchase this here.

the-girl-who-walked-on-air

The Girl Who Walked on Air by Emma Carroll

Inspired by history, Emma Carroll’s circus tale is set in the world of Victorian circuses. Another girl protagonist, this time Louie, who sells tickets at Chipchase’s circus. But she dreams of being a funambulist, training in secret before anyone else is awake.

There are other people keeping secrets though, including Mr Chipchase, and before long Louie is unravelling the mystery surrounding her absent parents, and her phenomenal talent for tightrope walking.

The structure of the book is purposefully like a show – with the first act at Chipchases, an interval in which Louis traverses the Atlantic, and the second act in which she defies death and crosses Niagara on a tightrope (inspired by the true story of Jean-Francois Gravelet, known as Blondin’ for his blonde hair).

Enthralling and riveting for its circus content, Carroll draws on a number of well-played tropes to establish her novel, from a red-haired extrovert orphan protagonist searching for a mother, to a Titanic-esque style sea-crossing (without the iceberg crash), and maltreatment of children/employees. However, Carroll has drawn from history, and the truth behind the stories she tells of daring stunts with wheelbarrows and all manner of props on a tight-rope make this story for children absolutely breath-taking.

It’s a gripping adventure mystery, mainly due to Carroll’s excellently tight plotting and her winning style, which carries the reader along with ease and grace. Bound up within the story is the determination of the heroine, and the life lessons of trust and bravery – two key skills from tightrope walking that can be transferred to real life.

This is a thrilling tale of circuses and self-discovery which leaves the reader satisfied. Another testament to a good book – every child I’ve met who has read this story has loved it. For age 9+ years. Buy yours here.

the-greatest-show

The Greatest Show of All by Jane Eagland

This rather easy yet compelling story by Jane Eagland retells the story of Twelfth Night in a dyslexia friendly print for a reading age of eight, yet with a teen audience in mind. It transposes the hidden identities, misplaced romance and fun world of Shakespeare’s play into the world of the circus.

Kitty follows her brother in running away from her family farm and joins a circus. But to work with the horses there, she has to disguise herself as a boy, which she does, successfully. Kit works with horse performer Jack and falls in love with him, but he in turn is in love with the tight-rope walker, Sarah. And Sarah is further tied into the love triangle.

With escaping lions, evil clowns, daredevil performances, this is a whirlwind of a book, but at no time too challenging to understand the plot twists, identities and emotions. Our protagonist Kitty is more than likeable – she is empathetic herself, kind and generous, and its lovely to see a story where good triumphs over bad and there’s a happy ending.

A great re-telling, perfect for its audience. Check it out here.

poppy-pymthe-war-next-door

Other great circus reads include Poppy Pym and the Pharaoh’s Curse by Laura Wood, and The War Next Door by Phil Earle, illustrated by Sara Ogilvie. Poppy Pym is about a girl who grows up in the circus, but when she turns eleven, the circus decide to send her to a proper school. The book turns into a mystery, after an incident with an exhibition of Ancient Egyptian artefacts at Poppy’s new school, but Poppy discovers she needs her circus family to help her solve the crime. The first in the series, this is a great adventure for readers aged 9+ with another feisty heroine. Buy it here.

Phil Earle’s book, The War Next Door, is the third in his series about Storey Street. The plot pivots on a turf war over a houseless patch of land in the middle of a row of terraces. The tussle over space and ownership and the reaction to the circus family who pitch up one day holds a dark side that contrasts nicely with this series’ generally upbeat and funny tone and self-referential author jokes. As in the first in the series, Demolition Dad, in which the father’s tendency to depression was tested, this too provides a good story with a deeper moral angle behind it, in this case, how one treats neighbours and ‘outsiders’. The circus performers are particularly brought to life by talented illustrator Sara Ogilvie. You can buy it here.

Strange Star by Emma Carroll and Thicker than Water by Anne Cassidy

straange star

Following on from Monday’s guest post by Emma Carroll, I review two recent children’s novels that draw on classic literature. Firstly, Carroll’s own novel, Strange Star, inspired by Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. A modern day Frankenstein draws together so many elements – from the inspiration of classic literature on today’s contemporary writers, to the teaching and love of science for young people, and in particular, girls (STEM reaching out its tendrils to young females) and also our modern obsession with the treatment of ‘other’, which is something that, believe it or not, has existed since the dawn of time: whether what is different is perceived as monstrous simply by the fact of it being ‘other’.

Strange Star begins in June 1816 with a group of friends gathered at a villa on the banks of Lake Geneva, telling each other ghost stories. It was where Frankenstein was reputed to have been imagined by Mary Shelley as she listened to stories from Byron and Percy Shelley. Carroll uses the scene to build tension and atmospheric chill, when a thudding at the front door reveals a strange, half dead child who, on awakening, proceeds to tell her tale.

She is Lizzie Appleby, a village girl from England who speaks of strange happenings, lightning strikes, the disappearance of animals, and the strange goings-on at Eden Court near her house, where a scientist is experimenting with lightning. By the end of the book, the connection is revealed, but there are spooks and thrills along the way, and some canny plot weaving.

As in Frankenstein, Carroll repeats the narrative within a narrative framework for her tale, but she goes further than simply using the inspiration of ghost stories and internal narratives. She has cleverly played on so many of the themes buried within the original text, from the use of fire, not only in a final denouement, but also in the lightning strikes, to themes of sight and light – light providing opportunity and yet also danger, and a lack of sight providing the most insight.

Carroll’s characters are vividly imagined, and although our first narrator is a boy, the bulk of the novel is Lizzie’s narrative, and she tells of the women who surround her. Throughout the story, the strength of women shines through, despite the historical context and the struggle they must surmount to prove themselves. From women and their relationship to motherhood, to women who are prepared to work hard and sacrifice themselves in the process, to the women of science who need to prove they are as good as their male counterparts. All in some way sympathetic characters – even those, who like Dr Frankenstein, push themselves too far in blind ambition and forget to think of what or who they may be hurting along the way.

The other point of view in Strange Star (in third person) is that of Felix, Lord Byron’s servant, who is also richly portrayed, and intensely simpatico, despite his own difficulties in the face of his ‘otherness’. Carroll draws together the historical implications of all these people with their differences – be it gender or race or disability – and shows how strength of spirit and tolerance can forge through.

The writing flows as with all Carroll’s novels; the descriptions are visceral and explore all the senses, but more importantly the plot is meaty and intense. This is storytelling at its very best, and with a deliciously haunting feel to it that readers will savour long into the night. Age 12+. You can buy it here.

thicker than water

Anne Cassidy attempts to get even closer to her original text, this time Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck, by recrafting her take on the story in Thicker Than Water.

George wants to run a record shop, with just enough money to get by. But he has Lennie to look after too, and despite his size, something about Lennie is not quite right and he certainly doesn’t recognise his own strength. So it’s inevitable that before long Lennie will lead them both into trouble, and with the sort of people they’re working for – the trouble will be deep and dangerous.

Of course the problem with tackling such a meaty book by an author such as Steinbeck and condensing the word count so significantly is that there isn’t time for a slow wallowing immersion into the complexity of the characters and their relationships to each other.

Steinbeck spends a large portion of his novel focussing on male relationships; a brotherly connection of protection and idealised friendship. This is what makes his tragic ending so poignant and heartfelt. Although Anne Cassidy’s also feels emotional, I think it’s a stretch to achieve quite such a wrench in a condensed novel.

There’s a languorous world-weariness in the original text, a reality come to bare that the American dream is all but an impossibility. In Thicker Than Water, George also seems to realise that his dream is probably unattainable, but the philosophical life-learning lessons to reach this realisation – anguished over in Steinbeck, is harder to pull off when reducing the age of the protagonists to teens, as Cassidy does in hers.

Although some of the moral ambiguity is stripped out, Cassidy has interpreted Steinbeck’s original thoughts on the economic turmoil and societal breakdown in America beautifully by positioning her own English characters within a pub, where a host of figures explore the lack of opportunities afforded them, and instead wallow in crime and social exclusion. This is clever and effective.

Cassidy also draws out the central premise of loyalty, and maintains some of the original themes, such as the natural world, the premise of loneliness, and the dogs.

This is a good standalone novel, or a companion piece to Of Mice and Men. There’s a quality to the text that’s dramatic, filmic even, and I could happily watch a stage adaptation of Cassidy’s too. Age 12+. You can buy it here.

Whether the reader approaches the books in ignorance of the original sparks of inspiration, or reads them as complementary novels, these are both well written, memorable novels. For me, it bumped the originals back onto the To Be Read Pile. But I’m glad I read the classics while young, for “the companions of our childhood always possess a certain power over our minds which hardly any later friend can obtain.” Thanks, Mary Shelley.

 

 

With thanks to Simon Lister for his valuable insight on OMAM.

Classic Literature’s Influence over Modern Novels – a guest post by Emma Carroll

straange star

This week on MinervaReads, two blog posts that take a look at contemporary fiction that mirrors, borrows from, or is inspired by, classic literature. Today, contemporary children’s author, Emma Carroll talks about recent examples of this, following on from the publication this month of her Frankenstein inspired story, Strange Star. To read MinervaReads’ review of Strange Star, click here

Having recently had published a story with its roots in ’Frankenstein’, my view on this subject doesn’t need much explanation. Yes, Strange Star is a nod in the direction of Mary Shelley and her gothic masterpiece- maybe it’s more than a nod (Badges? Banners? I ‘Heart’ Mary t-shirts?). I’m proud to join a long line of writers who’ve been influenced by classics from the past.

Reinventing classics is a popular, tried- and tested- genre in adult fiction. From the subtle ‘echo’ of Victorian sensation novels in books such as Fingersmith by Sarah Waters, and The Goddess and the Thief by Essie Fox, to direct ‘spin-offs’ such as Nelly Dean by Alison Case (Wuthering Heights), Jo Baker’s Longbourn (Pride and Prejudice), Mrs De Winter by Susan Hill (Rebecca) and the classic in its own right Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys (Jane Eyre). There are far too many to list here: suffice to say I’ve a soft spot for a good re-invention.

With regard to sequels/prequels/spin-offs certain classics seem to attract more attention. Often it’s because they’re very well known: Wuthering Heights, Jane Eyre, The Moonstone, Pride and Prejudice. Or, rather ambiguous: Rebecca, Wuthering Heights. Or, feature minor characters whose stories are bursting to be told: Lydia Bennett, Bertha Mason, Hindley Earnshaw. I had experience of this myself last year when writing a short educational version of Wuthering Heights for Collins. They requested it be from Heathcliff’s perspective: given his almost psychopathic tendencies in the original, making him age-appropriate was a challenge. I had to give him a motivation. Bronte’s gaps in the story were what triggered my own.

Which brings me on to the influence of classics in children’s literature. Many wonderful, hugely popular writers – Robin Stevens, Katherine Rundell, Katherine Woodfine – pay homage to the likes of Frances Hodgson Burnett, E. Nesbit, and Eva Ibbotson in their work. And I can’t go any further without mentioning the spectacular Five Children On the Western Front by Kate Saunders, which is a direct sequel to Five Children and It, and executed with incredible skill.

More recently we’ve had Return to the Secret Garden by Holly Webb, my particular favourite, the up and coming  Lydia- the Wild Girl of Pride and Prejudice by Natasha Farrant, and yes, my own Strange Star. I speak for myself here, but for me, writing something so directly linked to a classic was a way of exploring my relationship with that book. Frankenstein featured heavily in my teaching years: writing Strange Star helped me move on from that time in my life. The teacher in me still exists: I hope by reading something accessible, young people will go on to seek out the classics, or at the very least be aware of their cultural significance.

I’d say all of my books owe something to the classics. It’s not deliberate. Over the years I’ve read many, many books and in that time developed tastes, preferences, interests that have shaped who I am as a writer. You are what you read. Cut me open and you’d probably find a black Penguin Classics spine running through me.

With huge thanks to Emma Carroll, one of our most essential and talented contemporary children’s writers. For MinervaReads review of Strange Star, click here. To buy Emma’s latest book Strange Star, please click here.          

 

Summer Reading List

I’m not going to be blogging in August. It’s my month to take stock, recharge, and just READ. So, in case you’re wondering which books to pack/download for your children or take out the library for the summer reading challenge (see here), then here are a few suggestions.

i want my hat backoliver and patchwinnie at the seasidekatie mcginty

I recently re-discovered I Want My Hat Back by Jon Klassen. This is a modern classic and as close to picture book perfection as you can get. A bear is looking for his hat and asks a variety of creatures if they have seen it. It’s a simple concept expertly executed, with fabulous dry wit and wonderful facial expressions – the text and pictures complement each other flawlessly. It is fun to do different voices for different characters and good for all ages to discuss what happened to the rabbit and why! Oliver and Patch by Claire Freedman and Kate Hindley is a beautiful story about moving to a new place. Summer can be a transition time for lots of children, and it’s good to read a reassuring story about making new friends and settling into a new place. Phenomenal vocabulary, exquisite illustrations – it also shows the fun you can have in a city. For something more summery try Winnie the Witch at the Seaside by Valerie Thomas and Korky Paul. Much loved by children everywhere, this episode takes Winnie to the beach – although will Wilbur the cat stay dry? A good story, well told, with Korky’s distinctive style of illustrations. If you don’t want to rely on old favourites, this summer watch out for Katie McGinty Wants a Pet by debut author Jenna Harrington, illustrated by Finn Simpson, publishing 13th August. Katie wants a very different kind of pet (bet you can guess from the cover!). Although she may end up with slightly more than she bargained for – the writing style is fun and quirky – and captures a small child wonderfully – ‘She wanted it more than Millie Phillips wanted to be able to stand on her head.’

oliver and the seawigsclever pollylottie liptonthe gingerbread star ted rules the worldClaude Lights

My newly independent reading choices are a mixture of old and new too. Oliver and the Seawigs by Philip Reeve and Sarah McIntyre is a gem of a book, which takes the reader on a seafaring voyage unlike any other. The illustrations are sensational, look out particularly for Iris the mermaid. A classic, which has just been reissued and is well worth a read is Clever Polly and the Wolf by Catherine Storr. With 13 separate stories this is a good starter read. Each story is a play on ‘wolf fairy tales’, but magically don’t seem dated at all – and Clever Polly is remarkably likeable. If you’re doing any museum visiting this summer, or just looking to solve some riddles, a great read is the new Lottie Lipton series by Dan Metcalf, released in conjunction with the British Museum. These are well written little mysteries for growing readers but they have real riddles in them, and activities at the end. I’d love to read one whilst in the British Museum to see if I could follow the trail too. A must for young historians. For new or struggling readers I’m also heartily in favour of the Little Gem series from Barrington Stoke. There are numerous titles by fabulous authors in this list, but recent releases include The Gingerbread Star by Anne Fine, illustrated by Vicki Gausden and Ted Rules the World by Frank Cottrell Boyce, illustrated by Chris Riddell and Cate James. The Gingerbread Star retains the quality of Anne Fine’s longer work, and tells a glorious story of a worm who wishes she was a gloworm (so she can read in bed after lights out). She perseveres yet retains her sense of right and wrong throughout her adventure. Beautifully illustrated too – worms have never been so attractive. Ted Rules the World by high calibre writer Cottrell Boyce also retains the writer’s style – his sense of humour and mischievousness shine through in this hilarious story about a boy whose opinions on politics have a direct line to the prime minister. Far from marking him out as special though, Ted finds that the root cause is rather more uninspiring. It’s extremely funny. This agegroup also adore the Claude series by Alex T Smith, and on the 1st August, the new title is published, Claude: Lights! Camera! Action!. As zany as ever, Claude and Sir Bobblesock discover a film set and when the two lead actors are injured, they are asked to step in. The jokes hit on all levels – both children and adults. And that’s not all…this summer is momentous for the release of the very last Horrid Henry book by Francesca Simon: Horrid Henry’s Cannibal Curse. Although I’ve yet to see a copy of this and hate to review books I haven’t read I’m told it has an answer to the perpetual parental groan that Henry is too horrid…as Henry himself starts to read an interesting book about a girl called Evil Evie…

elspeth hart dara palmerrooftoppersmurder most unladylike
Eight to 13 year olds have a huge choice for their summer reads in this golden age of children’s literature. Firstly, I’d recommend Elspeth Hart and the School for Show-Offs by Sarah Forbes, illustrated by James Brown. The second in the series comes out in September, so wisely use the summer to read the first. It tells the tale of orphan Elspeth, working as a servant in the Pandora Pants School for Show-Offs, sweeping up mouse-droppings, and dodging the horrid students, until one day she realises why she’s there, and how she can escape. Comic fun and a school setting with a feisty heroine. Another show off is the eleven year old main character in Dara Palmer’s Major Drama by Emma Shevah. This is a fantastic story about a young adopted girl who desperately wants to be an actress. The story highlights how, through drama, she becomes more aware of herself and her relationship with her friends and family. Dealing with so many issues, such as adoption, diversity “I looked like a chocolate bunny in a room full of snowmen”, Dara’s voice is fresh, funny, and heartfelt. The massively annotated pages (doodles and patterns) entice the reader, as well as Dara’s imagined film script running parallel to her normal life, but Emma Shevah also deals cleverly with sensitive issues. Both an enjoyable read and an enlightening one (about adoption and different cultures). If your child hasn’t yet read Rooftoppers by Katherine Rundell, then buy it before her new book comes out in September. Rooftoppers tells the story of Sophie’s search for her mother across the roof tops in Paris. Katherine’s gift for storytelling knows no bounds – her writing is exemplary – stylish, fresh, original, and imaginative. It’s a perfect book and I implore you read it, instilling virtues such as love and courage and morality and seeking for the possibles in life. Its timelessness and third person narrative set it apart from other titles for this age group and it is a deserving winner of the Waterstones Children’s and Blue Peter Book awards. For series fans, I would recommend the Wells and Wong Mystery series by Robin Stevens. The first in the series, called Murder Most Unladylike, tells the story of Daisy and Hazel who set up a detective agency at their boarding school to look for missing ties etc, but then discover the body of the Science Mistress lying in the gym, and suddenly have a real mystery to solve. It is Agatha Christie for 9 year olds and over. Robin Stevens captures the innocence and yet vivaciousness of the two girls with all their insecurities and complexities. The book is set in the 1930’s but feels fairly timeless. It’s fun, imaginative, and brilliant for those who love mysteries and school stories. (so most children!). Three in the series have been published so far – an addictive set to devour on the beach, or staring at the rain…once you’ve read one, you’ll want to read them all.

boy in the towerthe executioners daughterbinny for shortphoenix

For slightly older readers, a haunting but utterly absorbing book for those wishing to ignore their family whilst on holiday is Boy in the Tower by Polly Ho-Yen. A modern day Triffids, Ade lives with his mum in a tower block, but one day the other buildings start to fall down. Before long the Bluchers have overtaken the landscape – plants that feed on metal and concrete, and give off deadly spores. Suddenly Ade and his mother are trapped. Ade has to learn to survive, figure out why his tower hasn’t collapsed and help his mother through the situation. It’s a tense, exhilarating read with memorable characters. Other stories for those slightly older are The Executioner’s Daughter by Jane Hardstaff– a historical tale, set in the Tower of London, and focussing on the ‘basket girl’, – the child who catches the beheaded heads in her basket. Never a dull moment in Tudor times – as the tale turns supernatural too. Salter, the loveable boy protagonist, is a sparkling creation. The sequel River Daughter, came out earlier this year. Binny for Short by Hilary McKay swings back to modernity, with a coming-of-age tale of friendship that deals with loss, relocation, family dynamics and special needs all in a highly readable, compelling summertime story. Binny is an all-rounded character, with frustration, humour, sympathy and a fantastic sense of childhood adventure. A great read from a prolific author who can clearly observe and articulate what people are really like. The sequel, Binny in Secret, came out in June. For those approaching teens, Phoenix by SF Said is my final pick. It’s something completely different – science fiction superbly written by Said, and ethereally illustrated by Dave McKean. It’s a powerfully ambitious tale of age-old war between Humans and Aliens. Lucky thinks he is an ordinary human boy, but once he discovers his extraordinary power realises that he must harness it to save the galaxy, even if it comes at huge personal cost. Bixa, the alien girl who gets mixed up in his story, is one of the most awe-inspiring characters in children’s fiction: fierce, magnetic and witty. I would definitely choose to dress up as Bixa on World Book Day if I were younger. This book is quite unlike any other in its age range – an epic with clear language, scintillating scenes and huge themes of power and myth, the universe and love, war and sacrifice. It will stay with you long after the summer fades.

Lastly, if you haven’t yet worked through my books of the week from this year, my most memorable reads were Stonebird by Mike Revell, The Dreamsnatcher by Abi Elphinstone, The Wild Beyond by Piers Torday and In Darkling Wood by Emma Carroll.

 

 

The Other Side of the Story: Dual Narratives – a Guest Post from Author Emma Carroll

in darkling wood  The girl who walked on air frost hollow hall

My book of the week this week is In Darkling Wood – you can read the review here. It’s by one of my favourite contemporary children’s authors, Emma Carroll. The book has a dual narrative structure, so I asked Emma to write about that. Here are her thoughts. Thank you Emma!

“As a reader I’ve always been intrigued by dual narratives. When they don’t work they feel jarring. You catch yourself speed reading back to your preferred narrator’s viewpoint. Yet when they do work, for me, they enhance a story brilliantly. They throw light and shade on characters, are a way of overcoming plot practicalities. And they bring perspective to remind us that people’s experiences, though sometimes similar, are ultimately unique – a ‘fiction’, as it were.

So, eighteen months ago, I decided my next novel would be a dual narrative. As a slow writer on a tight deadline this probably wasn’t my wisest move. But I wanted to stretch myself and try something different. Suffice to say it did make things harder. I’m neither a plotter nor a pantser when writing – I go through moments of being both.

emma work in progressEmma’s notebook (the pink post-its are the 1918 letters planning)

So for a while I wrote the 1918 letters part of In Darkling Wood. Then I stopped, deciding that no, I needed to write Alice’s story to make certain it worked alongside the letters. This was how IDW got written- a sort of stop-start approach. It felt messy and no doubt wasted lots of precious time, but in the end we got there!

Whether it enhances the reading experience or not is, ultimately, a matter of taste. Here are five novels for children and teens that in my view do dual narratives brilliantly.

wonder
Wonder by RJ Palacio more multiple narrator that dual, but in this brilliant story we hear from Auggie, his sister Via, Auggie’s schoolmate/bully Jack – and others. While Auggie’s viewpoint is the main focus, the different voices add complexity to what otherwise might be a black and white situation. We learn of the impact Auggie has on others, and how often he misinterprets this.
You can buy it here or on the Amazon sidebar.

selina penaluna

Selina Penaluna by Jan Page An exquisite dual narrative told from the points of view of WW2 evacuee Ellen, and mysterious local girl Selina. Their differing perspectives highlight how much we misunderstand each other. The changes in voice are wonderful too.
You can buy it here or on the Amazon sidebar.

how to fly with broken wings

How To Fly With Broken Wings by Jane Elson I love Jane’s stories, and in this, her second novel, Sasha and Willem are about as different as two narrators could be. Sasha is emotional, engaging, popular, full of personality, whereas Willem, bullied and vulnerable, has Aspergers. Together, in their very different ways, they find solace in restoring an old spitfire. Again, great voices! You can buy it here or on the Amazon sidebar.

shadow cat

Shadow Cat by Gillian Cross A pacy, skilful story packed with wild cats, rock stars, mental illness… and more – all brilliantly told from the perspectives of Nolan and Feather. Nolan’s narrative – grounded, sensible, yet increasingly desperate – is told in first person past tense. Feather – adopted daughter of a rock star – tells us her story as third person present tense. The change in narrative style flags up the point of view change very well for younger readers.
You can buy it here or on the Amazon sidebar.

Trouble

Trouble by Non Pratt One of my very favourite YA reads from last year, Trouble is told from the perspective of Hannah and Aaron. This works on many levels, not least because it makes us realise that how we see ourselves is not always how others do. And that however big your problems feel, other people often have just-as-big-problems of their own.
You can buy it here or on the Amazon sidebar.”

Thanks again to Emma Carroll for her guest blog. To purchase one of Emma’s modern classics, visit Waterstones here, or check out my Amazon sidebar. 

In Darkling Wood by Emma Carroll

My next book of the week will be published September 6th. For a list of my books of the week to date, scroll down to the bottom of this review.

in darkling wood

Both the narrative structure and subject matter of Emma Carroll’s latest story, In Darkling Wood, are indicative of her own distinct style: quietly modern and yet definitely traditional in application. The novel is told using a dual narrative – in letters dated 1918 from a young girl to her brother in the war, and a modern-day first person narrative of a girl called Alice who is sent to live with her estranged grandmother whilst her brother is in hospital for a heart transplant. By weaving the two very distinct narratives together, Emma Carroll creates a magical story that is both classical and contemporary – just like her style of her writing in all her books.
At first Alice struggles in her stay with her gruff grandmother – her anxiety about her brother shines through the text, as does her frustration with her parents and her grandmother, Nell. She befriends a mysterious girl in the woods bordering her grandmother’s house, and before long becomes embroiled in a battle to save the woods and the enigmatic creatures whom the mysterious girl claims reside within the trees. At the same time, the letters from 1918 reflect another young girl’s anxiety about her own brother, and a preoccupation with some enigmatic winged creatures in the wood. The two stories edge closer together, and the book’s resolution is satisfying and complete.
Emma Carroll neatly references the Cottingley fairies story – a series of five famous photographs taken by Elsie Wright and Frances Griffiths in Cottingley towards the end of the First World War that came to the attention of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and created a stir about the existence of fairies.
In Emma’s story, the fairies come to represent hope, and lead Alice to stand up for what she believes in.
The story is told sensitively, and is utterly engrossing. Each character is superbly drawn – the voices drip effortlessly from the page – from the distant yet forthright grandmother with secrets, to the absent father, sick brother, and the cast of characters in the modern school, as well as those from 1918. In fact, Emma’s time as a schoolteacher has clearly been useful – the school environment is one of the most believable I have encountered.
Furthermore her talent as a writer shines through in her description of Nell’s house and the Darkling Woods surrounding it – they remain an image within my head months after reading the book. It’s my last book of the week before the summer. Take it with you on holiday – but be warned – wherever you go, you’ll imagine you’re In Darkling Wood…

With thanks to Faber for the review copy. You can buy your own copy from Waterstones here, or see the Amazon sidebar.

My brother is a superhero by David Solomons
Too Close to Home by Aoife Walsh
The Cake, the Wolf, and the Witch by Maudie Smith, illustrated by Tony Ross
Alfie Bloom: The Secrets of Hexbridge Castle by Gabrielle Kent
There’s a Bear on My Chair by Ross Collins
The Sword of Kuromori by Jason Rohan
The Boys’ School Girls: Tara’s Sister Trouble by Lil Chase
Mad About Monkeys by Owen Davey
The Broken King by Philip Womack
The Imagination Box by Martyn Ford
Joe All Alone by Joanna Nadin
How to Write your Best Story Ever by Christopher Edge
Head Over Heart by Colette Victor
Wild by Emily Hughes
Violet and the Hidden Treasure by Harriet Whitehorn illustrated by Becka Moor
The Wild Beyond by Piers Torday
The D’Evil Diaries by Tatum Flynn
The Astounding Broccoli Boy by Frank Cottrell Boyce
Robot Girl by Malorie Blackman
How to Fly with Broken Wings by Jane Elson
A Whisper of Wolves by Kris Humphrey
The Dreamsnatcher by Abi Elphinstone
Squishy McFluff The Invisible Cat: Supermarket Sweep by Pip Jones and Ella Okstad
Stonebird by Mike Revell
Darkmouth by Shane Hegarty
The Wickford Doom by Chris Priestley
How the World Works by Christiane Dorion and Beverley Young
I am Henry Finch by Alexis Deacon, illustrated by Viviane Schwarz
The Story of Buildings by Patrick Dillon, illustrated by Stephen Biesty