Tag Archive for Corr Christopher

Christmas Picture Books

santas christmas handbookSanta’s Christmas Handbook
Buried in small print on the first page of this delightful Christmas book is the name of the author. I only discovered this after reading the book cover to cover, and rejoicing in the fact that I’d been sent a Christmas book that was entertaining, inventive, witty, and absolutely stuffed to the brim with interactivity. There are lift-the-flaps, games, puzzles and more, so that any reader will be kept preoccupied for some time. And then I saw that it is written by Christopher Edge, and so the well-thought-out contents and imaginative elements made sense – Edge is an experienced and witty writer.

The book is a Santa’s handbook that explains to Santa everything he needs to know to survive Christmas, and starts with a letter from the elves (the real authors of the book), with an enclosed to-do list. Each following page is a treasure trove of fun illustration with lift-the-flap sections. So, there is a sleigh complete with control board and storage, a guide to looking after reindeers, a map of the world with fastest routes for reindeer sleighs, an understanding of how to deliver presents, as well as instructions for navigating rooftops (even those without chimneys). A board game at the end with a ‘crimble-o-meter’ that really spins (excellent paper engineering) completes the book.

Wit triumphs throughout. I enjoyed the ‘insta-chimney’ invention, the potential pit-falls of skylights, the riskiness of large or noisy presents, the ‘SantaNav’ for directions, and first aid kits for ‘tinsellitis’ and more. Edge has all the ground covered here (including children at sea during Christmas), and this book is a packed stockingful of fun. You can buy it here.

mouses night before christmas
Mouse’s Night Before Christmas by Tracey Corderoy and Sarah Massini
Starting with the famous verse, ‘Twas the Night Before Christmas,’ this picturebook quickly swerves to point out that the mouse wasn’t still, but was indeed stirring. This little mouse, cutely rendered by illustrator Sarah Massini with trailing red woollen scarf, delights in Christmas but has no one to share it with. When Santa comes calling, Mouse hitches a ride and becomes the best little helper, but at the end of the night even Father Christmas has to leave, although not before gifting Mouse a present that leads to friendship and companionship.

An anti-materialistic message, in that Christmas is a festival best shared, the book’s illustrations brim with the colourful joyfulness of Christmas, an ornamentally decorated tree with a plethora of presents beneath, the magic of stars and snow, a full cohort of reindeer, and a traditional Father Christmas with twinkly bright eyes. Cute. You can buy it here.

cats christmas carol
A Cat’s Christmas Carol by Sam Hay, illustrated by Helen Shoesmith

More messages on friendship and sharing in this deliciously purr-fect tale for Christmas. Clawdia the cat looks after a department store, and loves to stick to the rules. So when mice break in looking for somewhere warm to hide, the book becomes a game of cat and mouse! Written with dexterity, Hay uses the rhythm of language to play with her plot – the chase is in rhyme, with the department store providing an awesome array of goods – excellent to run amok in. Shoesmith has fun here too – this is a modern department store with a bank of tills and electrical goods, although also with a nod to the traditional in the toy department, and in the layout of the front hall.

By the end, Clawdia gets what she most wants for Christmas, and it isn’t a mouse! The publicity boasts of this as a retelling of A Christmas Carol with whiskers and claws – I’m not sure most readers will see this parallel, other than through the title. The mice remind Clawdia of her own tawdry past, in the hope that she’ll be more generous in the present, but she is far too adorable to be a cat-in for Scrooge. Special touches include the family scene complete with children’s drawings and grandma, and the very lovely department store dining table – reminiscent of Pooh’s last supper at Pooh Corner, but this time Christmas-led with dominant red and greens, and an old-fashioned feel with candelabra, crackers and champagne. You can have a purrfect Christmas here.

follow the star
Follow the Star by Andy Mansfield
A feat of paper engineering in this pop-up Christmas journey as the traditional Christmas star journeys from Bethlehem to the top of a Christmas tree via fields, cities, and individual houses. The rhyming text does little to enhance the book, as the real attraction is the landscape portrayed on each page with intricate 3-D engineering, and a foiled star on each night sky. The yellow backdrop to the cityscape gives the buildings an interior warm glow, and the Christmas tree at the end is nicely done with coloured baubles on each frilly layer of the tree. You can buy it here.

leah's star
Leah’s Star by Margaret Bateson-Hill, illustrated by Karin Littlewood
For those harking for a traditional Christmas book complete with religious element, Leah’s Star twists viewpoint and tells the story of the birth of Jesus from the narrative perspective of Leah, the innkeeper’s daughter. She persuades her father to find room in the stable for the pregnant woman and her husband, and follows the course of the night as visitors come to see what turns out to be quite a special baby. With Bethlehem watercoloured in a hue of terracotta buildings, a warm yellow glow emitting from the stable, and characters painted with warm simpatico expressions, this is a distinctly comforting retelling of the Bible story. A tenderness infuses the illustrations, and Leah in particular is painted with a mix of wonderment, anticipation and kindness. A child’s innocence deftly portrayed. This was first published under the title Leah’s Christmas Story in 2006. You can buy it here.

Finally, very aptly for discussions about tree planting and sustainable Christmases, come three books focussed on the Christmas tree.

the tree thats meant to be
The Tree That’s Meant to Be by Yuval Zommer
A twinkly green cover points towards Christmas, and the protagonist is a small wonky fir tree in the woods, but happily this is a tree for life not just for Christmas. The landscape and scenery of the woods change as the seasons pass, and in winter people come to chop down other trees, but not this little tree, which is left all alone.

Luckily, Zommer’s trademark animals, including deer, foxes and birds with their slanted eyes come to keep the little tree company. The animals wonderfully decorate the tree ‘au naturel’ with acorns and fir cones and brown leaves, the bears standing on their hind paws, the squirrels bringing acorns. As the seasons turn again, the tree sees that it was meant to be part of nature, always in the forest, and it provides a home for birds, and a shelter for children.  Nature as intended.

Zommer’s illustrations are distinctive and beautifully textured – the leaves identifiable, the pictures nodding towards realism, whilst still lending a magical aura to the forest, and nodding to acknowledge their picture book status at the same time. A treat. You can buy it here.

oh christmas tree
Oh, Christmas Tree! By Sue Hendra and Paul Linnet
This lively full-on foiled cover picturebook also features a tree protagonist, one who doesn’t want to be trussed up with baubles and trinkets, but runs away from the decorations in order to be free. By the end, one of the decorations has come up with an idea of how to trick their tree into being more Christmassy. A fun frolicking rhyming book, and one with which children who abhor dressing up or being in the school play will identify. Lots of fun is had by Linnet, imagining the tree doing activities it actually enjoys rather than standing in a pot, such as cycling, baking, and doing science! You can buy it here.

the little fir tree
The Little Fir Tree by Christopher Corr
With a nod to Hans Christian Andersen, this tree protagonist longs to be picked for Christmas, and has to wait through the seasons to be big enough to be picked. The tree dreams of being wood for a ship, or log for a cabin, while the birds laugh at him wishing his life away. Then finally the tree is cut down, and is (in my opinion, strangely) happy as it is brought into a home and decorated with tinsel, ribbons and more, and told stories. The tree revels in its tallness and new-found importance, before being cruelly discarded. By the end though, a squirrel has given it new life. The illustrations are bright and bold, the people slightly sinister in their Picasso-esque profiles, their dress old-fashioned, but all imbued with personality – including even the sun and moon. Different, and certainly striking. You can buy it here.

With thanks to Templar, Nosy Crow, Alanna Max, Simon and Schuster, Oxford University Press, Macmillan and Frances Lincoln publishers for the review copies.

Autumn 2018 Picture Book Round-Up 2

a house for mouse
A House for Mouse by Gabby Dawnay and Alex Barrow
There’s a wonderful satisfaction in spotting literary allusions in texts, as if the author has winked at you, and you looked up to catch it. Sometimes they’re very well hidden – but for children it’s important that the literary allusions are accessible. A House for Mouse plays upon the enticing estate agent theme of looking into other people’s houses, and also the literary allusions game.

Mouse is searching for a new house, but they all seem to have negatives – clear building regulation failures (The Three Little Pigs), architectural issues (Gingerbread house), inaccessibility (Rapunzel’s tower), overcrowding (There was an Old Woman) and so on. He settles on Sleeping Beauty’s castle but realises that in the end, home is where his heart is, of course.

With humour galore, a fairy tale map at the beginning and soft pencil illustrations delineating the different landscapes, this is a comforting and appealing story book that is more about friendship than location. See if the book suits you here.

theres room for everyone
There’s Room for Everyone by Anahita Teymorian
Mouse was wise to share his castle with his friends – Teymorian uses her picture book to point out that although the library has enough space for all the books (she’s clearly never been in my house), and there’s enough room for all the stars in the sky, human beings constantly fight over space – be it on the train or in a larger context of land and war. The message is simple – that with kindness and love there’s enough room for everyone. What might come across as a little sanctimonious and simple becomes more thoughtful if the reader studies the illustrations used to make Teymorian’s point – the clever use of the boundaries of the page, the distorted long-limbed humans, the neat use of lines to create patterns and textures. A warmth oozes from the pages. There’s room for you here.

the dam
The Dam by David Almond and Levi Pinfold
Immediately bringing to mind the beginning of Haweswater by Sarah Hall, a novel tracking the lives of dispossessed people after the flooding of a valley, this may feel like a strange topic for a picture book. Walker, pushing the boundaries, allows Almond to tell the story, based on truth, of a dam building in Northumberland, which led to the flooding of a valley and the village within it. Here, Almond and Pinfold retell the story of the musicians who played music in this lost place before the flooding.

With themes of loss, dispossession, rebirth and the power of creativity, Almond blesses his lyrical text with a deep simplicity, much repetition, and a clear placing of words within their white background. However, it is Pinfold’s brown and dreamy illustrations that provide the atmosphere and haunting quality to the text, showing both the before and after effects with deep pathos, understanding and clever use of soft muted, almost sepia colour. Pinfold brings a clarity to his study of water and structure, rendering the narrative with a distinct sense of place. And the light – the light pours through the book like water into a flooded valley. You can buy it here.

mary and frankenstein
Mary and Frankenstein by Linda Bailey and Julia Sarda
Another atmospheric interpretation in this celebration of the 200th anniversary of the publication of Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. Bailey approaches her topic by investigating how the events of Mary’s life brought her to the moment of creativity, exploring how the story of Frankenstein festered and developed within Mary’s mind. From the death of her mother, to the animosity of her stepmother, the mood swings of her father and her travels and influences, Bailey creates a full image of Mary’s young years with just a few carefully chosen words.

Sarda’s illustrations use darkness, shadows and an almost Picasso-like angularity to illuminate Bailey’s words, creating an unforgettable aura in the people she draws and the landscapes she illustrates. The richness of the colour palette – vivid reds, oranges and browns elucidates the richness of the culture within which Mary was subsumed, but it is the clever rendering of the skies, storms, and imagination at work in dark greys that really sets the tone. Many details to look at, including the houses of the era, the interior décor, as well as gravestones and horses and carriage provide an extra thrill for readers. Like Frankenstein itself, an unforgettable book. Inspirational. (The book is titled Mary Who Wrote Frankenstein in the United States). Explore the life of Mary Shelley here.

on a magical do nothing day
On a Magical Do-Nothing Day by Beatrice Alemagna, translated by Jill Davis
Illustrations of a completely different order in this modern award-winning text about finding creativity and adventure out of boredom, now published in paperback. A purposefully gender ambiguous protagonist is told by the mother to put down the computer game and find something to do. The child leaves the house with the computer console in order to be out of sight, yet gradually becomes sucked into the natural environment.

At first miserable and bored, the child soon finds joy and creativity in solitude; the neon orange coat at first marking the child as separate from nature, but then seamlessly blending into the myriad of mushrooms and toadstools, and before long there is wonder to be found in the sensuous delights around – jelly snails, the aroma of fungi, the sifting of earth through fingers. The weather plays its part too, and at the end mother and child bond over quiet contemplation and hot chocolate.

This is a phenomenal book of everyday discoveries, with illustrations that make the reader draw breath. The change in perspective, the clever use of light, tone and vignettes gives the book an excitement, and yet also tender empathy. I’m longing for a Do-nothing Day of my own. You can buy the paperback here.

travels with my granny
Travels With My Granny by Juliet Rix and Christopher Corr
On the surface a vibrant picture book about destinations throughout the world, told by an adventurous Grandmother, this is actually a book about dementia, and explaining to children how to try to understand what people with dementia are going through. The grandmother believes she is really travelling, and the other adults explain that she doesn’t know where she is, but for the child, (again an ambiguous gender) he/she is happy to explore the grandmother’s mind, even if it seems confused.

The illustrations are bright and garish, depicting New York on a bright yellow background with multi-coloured skyscrapers and entertainments – as brash and brassy as Times Square. London is blue, Jerusalem orange, Rome a tender mauve. A few facts punctuate each city – in Delhi the tricycle taxis are rickshaws for example. The information at the back explains about dementia. An important, interesting addition. Buy it here.

Chinese New Year

Chinese New Year starts today, and this year, 2018, starts the Year of the Dog. These two wonderful new picture books celebrate aspects of the Chinese New Year.

The Chinese Emperor’s New Clothes by Ying Chang Compestine, illustrated by David Roberts

This wonderful retelling of the Hans Christian Andersen tale politicises the fairy tale, while also inverting the identity of the hero of the story. Whilst the hero is still a small boy in this version, he is also the emperor himself.

Rosy-cheeked little Ming Da becomes emperor of China at the young age of nine. But because he is so young, the ministers and advisers around him take advantage of him and steal from the treasury for their own gains. Soon, Ming Da’s kingdom is poor – the people can’t afford to dress, or buy food, but Ming Da is scared that the corrupt ministers will take over if he simply fires them.

With the help of his tailors, the boy emperor concocts a plan, and for the Chinese New Year parade, when traditionally people have dressed in new clothes so that evil spirits won’t recognise them, he tricks his ministers into wearing rice sacks and believing that the sacks are enchanted, and actually appear as the finest garments in the world.

A boy in the crowd does pipe up and shame them, but it is the emperor who has the last laugh, seeing his ministers flee in humiliation, enabling him to restore the riches to his people.

Compestine has bravely taken the origins of the tale together with a folklore element, and twisted them neatly to suit her purpose. In fact, she grew up in poverty during the Chinese Cultural Revolution, where food was scarce and Western folk and fairy tales banned.

Her book zings with both righteousness in the morality of the tale, but also in its new cultural identity and contemporary storytelling. David Roberts has created vivid, mesmerising artworks to match the tale, with colour vibrancy pared down so that the colour lives in the detail of the illustrations – the patterns of the silk robes, the intricate designs of ancient China. There is a clever switching too between full page framed illustrations and those that live in free space surrounded by white background.

The subtle colouring indicates a light touch, but also lets light onto the beautiful details of the expressive faces, as well as the sweet insertion of an observing mouse on each page. There is a guide to making your own Chinese New Year Parade robe at the back. You can buy it here.

The Great Race: The Story of the Chinese Zodiac by Christopher Corr

A complete contrast in the illustrations here, in which Corr uses his book to explain how the Chinese zodiac came to be. There is colour vibrancy from the outset, and illustrations that take on a looser, less geometric styling than Roberts’ above, but which still carry a fair amount of detail, and feel authentically Chinese, well-researched and lively.

The story begins before the delineation of time, in ancient China when the Jade Emperor decided that he wanted to be able to calculate how old he was, and thus there must be a way of measuring time.

The Great Race begins. The emperor decrees that the first twelve animals to cross the river will have a year named after them. The animals’ personalities come out in their method of crossing, from the rat who is devious to the lucky rabbit. Some of the animals even take to teamwork to get across.

This is such an appealing picturebook. An old folktale told in contemporary language, with breathtakingly colourful images – the picture of Emperor Jade welcoming the tiger across is particularly bright and evocative.

All the animals are ‘male’, which again reiterates the debate made in the Guardian last month, but this may be a nod to how the story was always traditionally told. However, as Compestine has shown above, twisting a tale is perhaps what’s now due.

Despite the male dominance in both books, these are fantastic introductions to the Chinese New Year, and beautifully illustrated. You can buy The Great Race here.

 

Out of Africa

Recently the journalist Ainehi Edoro wrote an interesting article in The Guardian about the bias of the book industry in terms of African novels, comparing the Western agenda when we publish, read and review African novels to the agenda applied when reviewing novels from the Western canon. We tend to attribute an imagined anthropological value to African fiction, assuming a cultural viewpoint about their issues and themes first, rather than seeing them as we would American or British books – in which we are simply guided in our reviews by characterisation, plot. Ie. Writing first and themes secondary.

bobo road

So it was with great interest that two picture books set in Africa arrived on my desk in the same week. One, published by an award-winning children’s publisher, is All Aboard for the Bobo Road, written by Stephen Davies and illustrated by Christopher Corr.

What’s extraordinary about this picture book is the colour. It is as if the African sun is shining directly out of the pages – the amount of brightness and colour detail is completely captivating – the children testers I used for this book positively beamed back at the lustre and glow.

Fatima and Galo board the bus bound for Bobo. Their father Big Ali drives the bus, and on the journey the children keep track of all the livestock, people and goods that are boarded onto the bus, as well as watching the landscape go past.

Readers can help to count cargo on and off the bus, including three bicycles, seven watermelons, five sacks of rice, nine goats and much much more. Along the way, the children see a hippo lake, a waterfall, the forest, rock domes, market stalls, and the Grand Mosque. Each page brims with detail and above all, colour.

At the waterfall for example, the water is like big slaps of blue paint against a brown rock background with a multitude of colourful patterned rugs in the foreground, plants at the summit, and people everywhere, with colourful clothes, bags and hats. The goods are stark and bold – blue and orange bicycles, colourful bundles on heads, an assortment of vehicles ferried on top of the bus. The ground itself isn’t brown or beige – but a bright purple. Each spread is differentiated in its colour, from the vibrant oranges of the rock domes to the lush green of the forest, the blue of the town.

Even the endpapers blaze with light and interest – tracking the different sites of Burkina Faso, which is where the author based his story, after his experiences there over several years. The text too shines, with the unloading and loading of cargo, the counting within, and the descriptions: the children are ‘tired and hungry’, Galo unloads watermelons ‘huffing and puffing’ and Fatima unloads rice ‘craning and straining’.

The last pages are particularly effective, subtly showing the difference between what children see and what adults see.

There are familiar traits for a bus picture book, such as the wheels of the bus turning round, and the beep beep as the bus sets off, but in other ways this is a truly original picture book, and stands out from the crowd as being the brightest I have ever seen. You can buy a copy here.

princess arabella

The other picture book is published by Cassava Republic Press, whose very ambition is to change the narrative on African books, rooting African writing in all its different experiences, be it rural or urban, past or future.  Princess Arabella’s Birthday by Mylo Freeman aims to show that not all princesses are blonde and blue-eyed, whilst also containing a clear message that princesses should be careful what they wish for.

Princess Arabella has everything she could possibly want, so her parents are stuck as to what to buy her for her birthday. The princess decides that she wants a real live elephant, and her wish is granted. The only problem – this is not a compliant elephant. The twist at the end of the book is delightful – but it’s the small illustrations throughout that endear Princess Arabella to the reader, and serve to make this a series to watch.

From the elephant-shaped balloon on the cover, to the hilariously bad parenting of the King and Queen and the size of the net used to catch the elephant – there is plenty in each illustration to make the reader giggle. The colours are vibrant, the jauntiness of facial expressions well-executed. It’s a simple story – for young readers – but conveys a vibrancy of personality and landscape, and conveys the beauty of another country – from the sandals on her feet to the sunset in the background – with ease and simplicity.

You can buy the book here.