Tag Archive for Jankeliowitch Anne

British Science Week

It’s British Science Week, 8th to 17th March, and it’s delightful to see hands-on experimenting happening at school and at home. We are growing crystals in the kitchen, and dropping eggs in school, and I’m thankful that the experimenting is that way around.

science is magicFor other science experiments, a new book is making life very easy. Science is Magic by Steve Mould is a science experiment book that uses everyday items. I don’t think there was a single item in the book that I needed to go out and purchase. Examples include a can of drink, a pack of cards, a measuring jug. Each experiment is fun and simple, and then leads onto explaining the science behind it.

We looked at the ‘pepper-repelling finger’ and learned about surface tension, experimented with ‘colour-changing potions’ and learned about the amount of acid in liquids, and made ‘a drinks can jump’ whilst learning about forces.

The reason it’s called magic – is because it aims to show things that appear to be magic, but can actually be explained by science. The tricks or experiments are easy to follow, but there are also pages on natural wonders that seem like magic, but can be explained, such as camouflage, erosion, and bio-luminescence. What’s more, there’s history too as Mould explains how certain tricks were performed in the past – how illusionist David Copperfield made the Statue of Liberty disappear in 1983, and many more.

The layout is  easy to follow with large pictures and typeface, not many of the experiments appear in previous science experiment books, and there’s a good glossary at the end. Experiment here.

gaming technologyFor the more tech-minded child during Science Week, there’s the STEM in our World series, and in particular Gaming Technology: Streaming, VR and More by John Wood and Kirsty Holmes. With lovely clear writing, Wood and Holmes explain, through the narrator called Tess Tube, why STEM is important – “it’s all about understanding and solving problems in the real world.”

Gaming is a big part of the leisure industry and the book takes the reader through the history, accessible gaming for those with disabilities, and how the industry has advanced, with techniques from motion capture to VR and streaming. The book also suggests how gaming can be more than just leisure – helping to keep humans healthy and fit, and outlines ‘citizen science’ – exploring how games can help research into diseases, genetics and the environment, using examples such as ‘eyewire’ to explain how. Whale FM is another, in which players listen to clips of whale-song and match to other clips that sound the same. Players are helping scientists.

Of course books illuminating such up-to-the-minute technology will date, but for the moment this is a great nonfiction book for kids that guides learning and discussion on the topic. Designed for KS2 Science (aged 7-11), the layout is coherent and colourful – a good balance of large text and pictures; photographic, diagrammatic, and illustrative. Go gaming here.

pop-up moonStaying with physics, but branching also into astronomy, is Pop-Up Moon by Anne Jankeliowitch, Olivier Charbonnel and Annabelle Buxton. This is a real feat of paper engineering, with pop-ups on every other page, which fold back down easily after many openings of the book, and aren’t so flimsy that the reader would be scared to touch. What’s more, each pop-up really works its science. The first is a graphic representation of the position of the Earth and Moon in relation to the Sun, and shows the phases over a month. This leads into a spread about the tides and some urban myths about the power of the moon. The next pop-up is the planets in orbit, cleverly done so that it stands up beautifully when the book is open. There is some good physics disseminated in later pages about light and shadow, and space exploration. Inspirational and informative, this is a good science book for Earth and Space topics. Fly to the moon here.