Tag Archive for Massini Sarah

Christmas Picture Books

santas christmas handbookSanta’s Christmas Handbook
Buried in small print on the first page of this delightful Christmas book is the name of the author. I only discovered this after reading the book cover to cover, and rejoicing in the fact that I’d been sent a Christmas book that was entertaining, inventive, witty, and absolutely stuffed to the brim with interactivity. There are lift-the-flaps, games, puzzles and more, so that any reader will be kept preoccupied for some time. And then I saw that it is written by Christopher Edge, and so the well-thought-out contents and imaginative elements made sense – Edge is an experienced and witty writer.

The book is a Santa’s handbook that explains to Santa everything he needs to know to survive Christmas, and starts with a letter from the elves (the real authors of the book), with an enclosed to-do list. Each following page is a treasure trove of fun illustration with lift-the-flap sections. So, there is a sleigh complete with control board and storage, a guide to looking after reindeers, a map of the world with fastest routes for reindeer sleighs, an understanding of how to deliver presents, as well as instructions for navigating rooftops (even those without chimneys). A board game at the end with a ‘crimble-o-meter’ that really spins (excellent paper engineering) completes the book.

Wit triumphs throughout. I enjoyed the ‘insta-chimney’ invention, the potential pit-falls of skylights, the riskiness of large or noisy presents, the ‘SantaNav’ for directions, and first aid kits for ‘tinsellitis’ and more. Edge has all the ground covered here (including children at sea during Christmas), and this book is a packed stockingful of fun. You can buy it here.

mouses night before christmas
Mouse’s Night Before Christmas by Tracey Corderoy and Sarah Massini
Starting with the famous verse, ‘Twas the Night Before Christmas,’ this picturebook quickly swerves to point out that the mouse wasn’t still, but was indeed stirring. This little mouse, cutely rendered by illustrator Sarah Massini with trailing red woollen scarf, delights in Christmas but has no one to share it with. When Santa comes calling, Mouse hitches a ride and becomes the best little helper, but at the end of the night even Father Christmas has to leave, although not before gifting Mouse a present that leads to friendship and companionship.

An anti-materialistic message, in that Christmas is a festival best shared, the book’s illustrations brim with the colourful joyfulness of Christmas, an ornamentally decorated tree with a plethora of presents beneath, the magic of stars and snow, a full cohort of reindeer, and a traditional Father Christmas with twinkly bright eyes. Cute. You can buy it here.

cats christmas carol
A Cat’s Christmas Carol by Sam Hay, illustrated by Helen Shoesmith

More messages on friendship and sharing in this deliciously purr-fect tale for Christmas. Clawdia the cat looks after a department store, and loves to stick to the rules. So when mice break in looking for somewhere warm to hide, the book becomes a game of cat and mouse! Written with dexterity, Hay uses the rhythm of language to play with her plot – the chase is in rhyme, with the department store providing an awesome array of goods – excellent to run amok in. Shoesmith has fun here too – this is a modern department store with a bank of tills and electrical goods, although also with a nod to the traditional in the toy department, and in the layout of the front hall.

By the end, Clawdia gets what she most wants for Christmas, and it isn’t a mouse! The publicity boasts of this as a retelling of A Christmas Carol with whiskers and claws – I’m not sure most readers will see this parallel, other than through the title. The mice remind Clawdia of her own tawdry past, in the hope that she’ll be more generous in the present, but she is far too adorable to be a cat-in for Scrooge. Special touches include the family scene complete with children’s drawings and grandma, and the very lovely department store dining table – reminiscent of Pooh’s last supper at Pooh Corner, but this time Christmas-led with dominant red and greens, and an old-fashioned feel with candelabra, crackers and champagne. You can have a purrfect Christmas here.

follow the star
Follow the Star by Andy Mansfield
A feat of paper engineering in this pop-up Christmas journey as the traditional Christmas star journeys from Bethlehem to the top of a Christmas tree via fields, cities, and individual houses. The rhyming text does little to enhance the book, as the real attraction is the landscape portrayed on each page with intricate 3-D engineering, and a foiled star on each night sky. The yellow backdrop to the cityscape gives the buildings an interior warm glow, and the Christmas tree at the end is nicely done with coloured baubles on each frilly layer of the tree. You can buy it here.

leah's star
Leah’s Star by Margaret Bateson-Hill, illustrated by Karin Littlewood
For those harking for a traditional Christmas book complete with religious element, Leah’s Star twists viewpoint and tells the story of the birth of Jesus from the narrative perspective of Leah, the innkeeper’s daughter. She persuades her father to find room in the stable for the pregnant woman and her husband, and follows the course of the night as visitors come to see what turns out to be quite a special baby. With Bethlehem watercoloured in a hue of terracotta buildings, a warm yellow glow emitting from the stable, and characters painted with warm simpatico expressions, this is a distinctly comforting retelling of the Bible story. A tenderness infuses the illustrations, and Leah in particular is painted with a mix of wonderment, anticipation and kindness. A child’s innocence deftly portrayed. This was first published under the title Leah’s Christmas Story in 2006. You can buy it here.

Finally, very aptly for discussions about tree planting and sustainable Christmases, come three books focussed on the Christmas tree.

the tree thats meant to be
The Tree That’s Meant to Be by Yuval Zommer
A twinkly green cover points towards Christmas, and the protagonist is a small wonky fir tree in the woods, but happily this is a tree for life not just for Christmas. The landscape and scenery of the woods change as the seasons pass, and in winter people come to chop down other trees, but not this little tree, which is left all alone.

Luckily, Zommer’s trademark animals, including deer, foxes and birds with their slanted eyes come to keep the little tree company. The animals wonderfully decorate the tree ‘au naturel’ with acorns and fir cones and brown leaves, the bears standing on their hind paws, the squirrels bringing acorns. As the seasons turn again, the tree sees that it was meant to be part of nature, always in the forest, and it provides a home for birds, and a shelter for children.  Nature as intended.

Zommer’s illustrations are distinctive and beautifully textured – the leaves identifiable, the pictures nodding towards realism, whilst still lending a magical aura to the forest, and nodding to acknowledge their picture book status at the same time. A treat. You can buy it here.

oh christmas tree
Oh, Christmas Tree! By Sue Hendra and Paul Linnet
This lively full-on foiled cover picturebook also features a tree protagonist, one who doesn’t want to be trussed up with baubles and trinkets, but runs away from the decorations in order to be free. By the end, one of the decorations has come up with an idea of how to trick their tree into being more Christmassy. A fun frolicking rhyming book, and one with which children who abhor dressing up or being in the school play will identify. Lots of fun is had by Linnet, imagining the tree doing activities it actually enjoys rather than standing in a pot, such as cycling, baking, and doing science! You can buy it here.

the little fir tree
The Little Fir Tree by Christopher Corr
With a nod to Hans Christian Andersen, this tree protagonist longs to be picked for Christmas, and has to wait through the seasons to be big enough to be picked. The tree dreams of being wood for a ship, or log for a cabin, while the birds laugh at him wishing his life away. Then finally the tree is cut down, and is (in my opinion, strangely) happy as it is brought into a home and decorated with tinsel, ribbons and more, and told stories. The tree revels in its tallness and new-found importance, before being cruelly discarded. By the end though, a squirrel has given it new life. The illustrations are bright and bold, the people slightly sinister in their Picasso-esque profiles, their dress old-fashioned, but all imbued with personality – including even the sun and moon. Different, and certainly striking. You can buy it here.

With thanks to Templar, Nosy Crow, Alanna Max, Simon and Schuster, Oxford University Press, Macmillan and Frances Lincoln publishers for the review copies.

Quick Gift Guide: Books

Are you still stuck for Christmas gifts? Perhaps it’s not for Christmas, but a seasonal present. I’m always pleased to receive a book – and trust me I already have a few! Here are some eclectic titles that have nothing to do with Christmas, which various family members might like:

the boy and the bear
For the very young:
The Boy and the Bear by Tracey Corderoy and Sarah Massini
There’s a wintry feel with this delightful picture book about unlikely friendship, and patience. With glowing silver snowflakes on the cover, and a boy in a woolly hat holding hands with an adorable bear, the book gives a warm fuzzy feeling from the start. The story has an old-fashioned timeless feel, the boy running in the countryside flying a paper aeroplane with satchel swinging from his hip. There is not a screen in sight. Nor a friend either. But there is a shy bear. Although seemingly incompatible (in the most adorable ways), the pair strike a friendship, which has to take a hiatus for hibernation. The matching of text to illustration strikes perfection here. There is humour, pathos, a conveyance of the passing of time, and so much emotion. I suggested this for the very young, but if you’re young at heart, you’ll love this too. An absolute gem of a picturebook. You can buy it here.

Phoebe and Her Unicorn

For the unicorn-obsessed (and others)
Phoebe and Her Unicorn by Dana Simpson (7+)
This glittery pink full length comic strip novel tells a cute story in simple sharp lines, with jokes a-plenty, and will enthral youngsters with its tale of Phoebe and her vain mythical animal companion. Phoebe skips a rock across a pond and accidentally hits a unicorn in the face. The unicorn, until then completely absorbed in its own reflection, is thankful for the distraction and grants Phoebe a wish. She wishes for the unicorn, Marigold Heavenly Nostrils, to be her obligatory best friend. And thus the adventures begin. As you’ve noticed from the name of the unicorn, there’s more than a hint of mischief here, but the book also bears a special message about overcoming loneliness and finding one’s own strengths and virtues. This is a lot of fun, and because the comic strip maintains focus on the key characters rather than deviating too much into the landscape, and the strips are self-contained, the story is easy to follow for reluctant readers. The newest full length comic strip title is Phoebe and Her Unicorn in Unicorn Theater. Sweet and sugary, and reminiscent of My Little Pony with a bit of attitude, this is a US title now available here.

the ink house
For the appreciative art fan:
The Ink House by Rory Dobner (8+)
This isn’t a usual picture book. More a unique curiosity through the artist’s mind as he seeks to explore the insides of The Ink House, an intricately designed mansion built on a pool of ink, in which a party of animals is due to take place, after the human resident takes off in a hot air balloon to search for further knickknacks to add to his treasured collection.

The illustrations, in ink of course, are amazingly detailed and stunningly imagined. There’s a darkness, a gothic tendency in the drawings, and the feeling is that each stroke is penned as delicately as if he were crafting a poem. The story isn’t really a story – just a menagerie of animals within a setting, and the scenes in which Dobner showcases the house in most detail work best. The mouse on the desk with piles of books, clocks, candle, quill pen; the ape in armchair with guitar, old-fashioned tea set, and gramophone showcases the neat juxtaposition between old and new, distorting one’s expectations and reality; the horses in the tiled hallway complete with pillars and a view onto the gardens. The artwork is disturbing, disjointed and wonderful, justifying the purchase even if the text is a little clunky. My advice – add your own words to the pictures, and tell the story in your head. You can buy it here.

absolutely everything

For everyone:
Absolutely Everything by Christopher Lloyd, illustrated by Andy Forshaw
The author of this conversational tome is nothing if not ambitious. The contents of this nonfiction narrative span from the Big Bang through dinosaurs, homo sapiens, ancient civilisations, the classical empires to the medieval, age of exploration, revolutions, wars and onwards. Everything in fact. The tone is avuncular, as if you’ve asked a favourite relative to let loose – tell me about the ancient Greeks, Chris…In this chapter, Lloyd starts with an anecdote about an olive, which merges into why olive oil was so precious, then onto slaves, democracy and war…you can see how the narrative flows from one idea to another, incorporating facts, events and stories. Each section is colour-coded for easy reference and there are colour visuals throughout, from illustrations adorning the text to photos, maps, timelines etc. There’s a nice linear progression to the book, an understanding of how one thing in history leads to another (although this is definitely Western civilisation’s history), and an over-riding infectious enthusiasm to explore how societies linked up, how the world became global. Engrossing and all-encompassing. Give as a gift, and keep a copy for yourself. The sort of book to stop you getting bored in the holidays. You can buy it here.