Tag Archive for Robinson Michelle

New Rhyming Picture Books

i really want to winI Really Want to Win by Simon Philip, illustrated by Lucia Gagg
Following on from the Waterstones Children’s Book Prize shortlisted I Really Want the Cake, our heroine is back for Sports Day – excited because she knows she’s going to win, and like any good footballer, has planned her celebration.

But she doesn’t win at Sports Day, and then finds she’s not winning at spelling competitions either, nor art prizes nor even a simple game of hide-and-seek. There’s another girl who seems to pick up every trophy (isn’t there always one!) Even when this rival doesn’t achieve top prize, she congratulates the winner graciously. Our heroine is less than gracious.

There are numerous lessons here; one that it’s the enjoyment of the journey, the taking part, that matters, but also, and nicely conceived, is the message that one can’t be good at everything, but everyone has a skill. However, rather than being preachy, it ends with our heroine winning something she’s good at…

It’s not just the fabulous rhythm and rhyming that makes this book great, (some text picked out in large capitals for emphasis, so that it feels as if the girl’s effort is in convincing the reader as well as herself) although these attributes are impeccable. The illustrations are faultless too – the earnestness, desire and straining of the little girl communicated through every picture. Her rival is simply hilarious, winking at the reader, her tummy straining over her shorts when she wins tug of war, her poise as a dancer smug, her posture exemplary.

There is so much to love about this book – the other classmates, the mass of trophies, the utter frustration of the little girl wanting to win, and the incremental detail of her small dog offering comfort, support, and sympathy as the book progresses. An absolute winner.  You can win (buy) here.

tooth fairy in trainingTooth Fairy in Training by Michelle Robinson, illustrated by Briony May Smith
Another fantastic pairing in the picture book world, as Michelle Robinson spins another rhyme about a popular subject, joined by the exquisitely folksy illustrations of May Smith, all lovingly produced inside a full-on iridescent cover that shimmers and shines as any tooth fairy’s wings would.

May is in training to be a tooth fairy, and is taken out by her big sister on ‘collecting’ missions. The issue is that it is not just humans who lose teeth, and so she has to make her way around crafty crocodiles, snakes and sharks. But of course, her most dangerous moment comes in the human’s house.

Briony May has gone to town on her fairy tropes with toadstools, large strawberries, a bed in a matchbox, an array of fairy dust-strewn pages – a definite harking to the days of the flower fairies. This is a fairy world well-imagined with intense attention to detail, and the wonder of teeth in jars, all set in a world gently coloured with the warmth of a yellow light, and the night-time purple streaked with the pink contrails of fairy flight.

Swishes and wishes, keepers and sleepers, the rhymes work well, the rhythm is great for those ‘out-loud’ reads. If you’ve ever had to help out the tooth fairy, or forgotten (oh no), then this book will help explain that sometimes tooth fairies are extremely busy! Find a tooth fairy here.

the runaway peaThe Runaway Pea by Kjartan Poskitt, illustrated by Alex Willmore
Peas have had a bad rap in picture books ever since Evil Pea was created by Sue Hendra, but this friendly Pea is the one who has escaped from the plate, rolled onto the floor and is in search of fun.

It doesn’t start well though, splatting into sauce, plopping into the dog bowl, narrowly escaping being burnt to death in the toaster, before ending up under the fridge with a marvellous host of mouldy other escapees. All should be lost, except that Pea has a surprise ending (due in part to the cleaner of the kitchen and their green awareness!)

This is a clever, witty rhyming book, perfect for read-aloud storytime, that not only increases vocabulary, tells a funny story and will have children laughing, but also ends with an environmental message.

Illustrated by Alex Wilmore, with an eye for cartoon expression and characterisation, each page takes the simple shapes of the kitchen and fashions a whole landscape from them, imbuing the fruit and vegetables with telling facial expressions. Fun, fast and imaginative, Runaway Pea rivals Evil Pea. It is, to quote the publishers, definitely appealing. Run away with a pea here.

Nine New Picture Books Begging to be Read

little red reading hood
Little Red Reading Hood by Lucy Rowland and Ben Mantle
‘Why didn’t I think of that play on words?’, is the first thing I thought upon reading the title, but when I perused the insides, I realised I couldn’t have done it better myself. This is a captivating and entrancing picture book – the sort a child treasures and rereads. Little Red Reading Hood loves books and in a twist, doesn’t visit her grandma, but rather, the library. When Little Red Reading Hood and the tenacious librarian impress the wolf with their literary knowledge and analysis, the wolf turns to stories instead of eating people.

The twist here, is that instead of straying from the physical path through the woods, it’s better to stray from the all-too-predictable ending of a story, and instead, reinvent it.

The story is told in rhyme, with pitch perfect rhythm, but it’s also the little touches that enhance this picture book so wonderfully. From the endpapers with Little Red Reading and the wolf having fun mixing up fairy stories, to the beautiful ethereal golden-hued illustrated imagination that soars through the book, to the nature depicted in the woods. This is a fabulous new picture book and my top choice. You can buy it here.

pirates of scurvy sands
The Pirates of Scurvy Sands by Jonny Duddle
The Pirates Next Door is an immensely popular read, and this sequel keeps equal pace and humour with the original. In fact, just one reading of it inspired my little tester to find and read ALL of Duddle’s back catalogue. This time round, Matilda is going on holiday with her pirate friends, the Jolly-Rogers. Their destination – Scurvy Sands – like a sort of Butlins for pirates. The only trouble is that Matilda, with her squeaky clean demeanour, doesn’t quite fit in.

This is a totally luscious affair for pirate fans. Also told in rhyme, it’s simply packed with swashbuckling vocabulary and pirate allusions, with a busy backdrop on every page – telescopes, pirate paraphernalia, characters and more. Duddle has gone to town (or sea) and had lots of fun in the process. There’s even a treasure map on the reverse of the book jacket. Gold coins all round. You can buy it here.

cat and dog
Cat and Dog by Helen Oswald and Zoe Waring
For younger children comes this exquisitely illustrated lesson on getting on with others. A nocturnal cat and a diurnal dog love to scrap, but when they fail to see eye to eye on their different routines, and Dog insults Cat, it looks like a beautiful friendship is over. By the end, of course, they learn to say sorry and accept each other’s differences.

It’s the illustrations in this simple story that bring it to life, two hugely endearing and familiar animals, drawn so that they look good enough to stroke. The crayon-led illustrations add to the familiarity of the chosen pets, and the last page of their ‘scrapping’ together is a clever childish mess. Too cute to miss, this is a lovely publication from new publisher on the block, Willow Tree Books. You can buy it here.


I Say Ooh You Say Ahh by John Kane
One for reading out loud to a willing audience, this reminded me of those old-time party entertainers, but here, the silliness is executed with modern panache and an element of complete childhood joy.

This is a traditional call and response book – the author asks the reader to say or do something every time they read or see something. The result has an hilarious effect, leading to the children shouting underpants quite often. The reader has also to remember which action goes with which command, so it’s stimulating too. Great for classroom fun, and the colours are bold, bright and all-encompassing. The author used to work in advertising – and it shows in the block colours – easy to look at, easy to understand. You can buy it here.


Ten Fat Sausages by Michelle Robinson and Tor Freeman
It’s often remarked how translated fiction can go further and push more boundaries than our home-grown picture books, but here’s one that takes the ten protagonists and really gives them a raw (cooked) deal.

A play on the song, Ten Fat Sausages Sizzling in a Pan, here Michelle Robinson shows what happens when they try to save themselves. Unfortunately, sausages don’t appear to be very clever. Whether it’s leaping from the pan into the blender, or even into a ceiling fan, it seems that no sausage is safe.

The illustrations from Tor Freeman match the madness of the concept – from blueberries with their eyes covered, to weeping sausages, hoola hooping onion rings, and an almost retro comic feel to the lot – this is a crazy sausage adventure. Sure to bring out the giggles in little ones. You can buy it here.


The Strongest Mum by Nicola Kent
Being a mum, and having a great mum myself, I’m always touched by the portrayal of fabulous mothers in picture books – be it giving Sophie a fabulous tea when the tiger arrives, or returning to the Owl Babies at the end of the night. The mum in this delightfully sweet picture book amasses belongings and carries them all as if she were weightlifting for England.

Dealing with a familiar issue (carrying everything!) – and why giving up the buggy too early and having to schlep all the shopping by hand can be a mistake – this is a wonderfully exaggerated portrayal of a super mum. From carrying some treasure found in the garden at the beginning, Little Bear’s Mum ends up carrying everything including Zebra’s shopping, Lion’s laundry, and then…a piano. It all comes crashing down though, and Little Bear realises he has to help.

The illustrations are undeniably child-friendly, in a multitude of jewel colours, with an aerial view of Mum’s bag, each item labelled! With oodles of white space, the book doesn’t feel slight because every illustration is packed with texture, pattern and colour, despite a slight transparency to it all. An intriguing new style and a good pick for Mother’s Day. You can buy it here.


Lionel and the Lion’s Share by Lou Peacock and Lisa Sheehan
Another for a slightly younger readership, giving a moral story, this encourages children to share. Lionel the Lion is bigger than most of his friends, and good at snatching. So whenever they see something they want, Lionel always gets there first. When Lionel goes a bit too far at Chloe the Cat’s birthday party, he realises that he’s angry and sad, and needs friends most. Sharing is best.

Drawn with tender pencil strokes, Lionel himself is phenomenally vibrant, with a large orange and brown mane, and his animal friends are equally detailed. They are vastly anthropomorphised with clothes as well as human behaviours, but it is the colourfulness and fun of the backgrounds that enhance this picture book. A detailed musical instrument shop, a hat shop, and the village green – this storybook world looks timeless and appealing. You can buy it here.


Robinson by Peter Sis
A bit of a love letter to Robinson Crusoe, this picture book takes a look at the meaning of being bullied for liking something different, and also a whimsical approach to solitariness. It also shows what happens when a child or adult finds inspiration, solace and adventure in a storybook and use it within their own lives.

In fact, author Peter Sis researched the flora and fauna of Martinique, the inspirational island behind Defoe’s novel, and used his knowledge to illustrate the book. Sis’s fine art background gives some insight into the illustrations in these structured and intriguing pictures. He plays with point of view and light and shadow to create an utterly unique look to the book. The colour palette tells the plot just as much as the narrative itself.

Typeset in uppercase letters, the whole book feels like a stream of consciousness, a message in a bottle, as the colours blossom and bloom with the boy’s discovery of his own island in the imagination.

The book aims to deliver a paean to the act of adventuring and exploration, even that which happens in the mind rather than in actuality. A great discovery. You can buy it here.


My Worst Book Ever by Allan Ahlberg and Bruce Ingman
Last, but definitely not least, if you’re wondering how all those authors and illustrators featured so far produced their books, then you’d best read My Worst Book Ever. Allan Ahlberg and Bruce Ingman are no strangers to the picture book trade, and here they’ve created a humorous look at what can go wrong when writing a book.

A classic book within a book scenario, as Ahlberg explores how he is writing a picture book about crocodiles, the text of which is hinted at within this book, but then things start to go wrong – the illustrator has different ideas, as does the publisher, and then a naughty girl at the printers messes it up even further. Added to this are all the various procrastinations that writers bow to – distractions out the window, family interruptions etc.

For children this is a fun and humorous look at the publishing trade. For writers, it’s a mirror. Illustrated cheerfully, this will bring a wry smile to many a face. You can buy it here.

 

Halloween Round Up

Writers and publishers love cultural events upon which they can hook a theme – be it glowing Christmas scenes or the approach of a new season – windy autumns, growth in spring. Halloween seems to intensify every year in the UK – a very large percentage of the autumn books I received had a ‘spooky or witchy element’ to them, and I don’t mean that the pages turned by themselves (although that would be useful). So, to help you through the ghosts and ghoulies, here are my spooky and also witchy-themed picks:


Witch for a Week by Kaye Umansky, illustrated by Ashley King
Not unlike Sylvia Bishop’s stories, also illustrated by Ashley King, this latest from top children’s author Kaye Umansky is an absolutely charming story, which is ideal for newly independent readers. Elsie is recruited to house-sit for local witch Magenta Sharp for a week, and although promised a quiet easy week, has to contend with a host of quirky eccentric neighbours, a tower with personality, and a grumpy talking raven. Each character is well-defined, and Elsie herself is beautifully drawn as unflappable, book-loving, and kind.

The book contains some lovely touches, including hilarious customer service rules (Elsie has been schooled in retail), a love potion that goes awry, a book of instructions that seems to be blank, and a sassy witch whose business is mainly mail-order. Sumptuously modern, but with an old-fashioned fairy tale feel, this is one new witchy series which I’ll be recommending to all. Fun, memorable, touching and bubbly – a real hug of a book. Magic it here.


Spectre Collectors: Too Ghoul for School by Barry Hutchison, illustrator Rob Biddulph
Some books just scream cinema. This highly visual first-in-a-series will delight comedy fans everywhere. Opening mid-action, Denzel is in the middle of maths homework when his home appears to be invaded at first by a poltergeist, and then by two figures with a gun. Before long, he too is recruited to be part of the ‘Spectre Collectors’, a kind of cross between Ghostbusters and Men in Black, an organisation in which children use magic and technology to rid the world of ‘spectres’.

With impeccable timing on jokes, sparkling top-class humorous dialogue between Denzel and his mates, and great variety of action scenes, this is a wonderful ghostly spoof. Beware a terrifying episode in the middle in which Denzel’s two fathers don’t remember him at all – as if his existence has been scrubbed from the world – but there are enough laughs and improbabilities to combat the darkness. For age 8-12 years. Spook it here.


Amelia Fang and the Barbaric Ball by Laura Ellen Anderson
Vampire Amelia wants to hang out with her pet pumpkin Squashy, but her parents insist she attends their Barbaric Ball. When Squashy is captured, Amelia must plan a daring rescue. This highly illustrated read for 7-9 year olds dazzles with superb illustrations, macabre puns, (including diePhones, scream teas and daymares), and is set in a grisly Nocturnia. But Amelia is a fun, endearing and captivating protagonist, and Anderson’s energy shines through with exuberance in both the prose and the illustrations. Much of the normal landscape has been inverted of course, with the characters sleeping by day and playing by night, as well as ‘cute’ things being feared, and gruesomeness celebrated. Join the vampires here.


Vlad the World’s Worst Vampire by Anna Wilson, illustrated by Kathryn Ourst
I’m not convinced Amelia would love Vlad, but this reader certainly did. Another vampire adventure for 7-9 year olds, Vlad isn’t keen on being a vampire. He secretly reads a rather jolly boarding school book about normal children and decides that it would be nicer to live an Enid Blyton-esque existence. Anna Wilson’s trademark humour works a treat in this rather adorable little adventure, in which Vlad tries to balance his life between human school, in which they don’t realise he’s a vampire, and home life, in which he has to hide his new friends from his family.

Added to the plot are some wonderful little touches, such as his new friends telling Vlad that he needs to get his teeth fixed, to Vlad’s relationship with his very elderly grandfather, but mainly his growing friendship with Minxie. Ourst’s illustrations are a joy – very cartoonlike with gleeful vibrancy. The final picture of Minxie and Vlad laughing is enough to bring a smile to any youngster’s face. A thoroughly enjoyable vampire adventure story, sparkling with wit and warmth. Look out on the blog to see a guest contribution from author Anna Wilson next week, and you can show Vlad some pathos by buying your own copy here.


You Can’t Make Me Go to Witch School by Em Lynas, illustrated by Jamie Littler
A slightly longer adventure story from Nosy Crow publishers for the 7+ age group, which sees the advent of another little witch. Daisy Wart wants to be an actress, more particularly she wants to star as Shakespeare’s Bottom on the stage. But when her grandmother dumps her at Witch School, she struggles to escape, despite all her dramatics. This is a strange school, with cauldrons for beds, pupil-eating plants in the school garden, and the ghost of the former headmistress stalking the corridors – a step up from the sudden appearances of Miss Hardbroom in The Worst Witch.

There are highly original touches and a fixation with hats to distinguish this from other ‘witchy school’ books, and Daisy is a protagonist who definitely fulfils the role of leading lady, with her particular brand of speech and her innermost thoughts about the other characters. First in a series, this book sets up further adventures rather nicely, when Daisy, as I’m sure you’ve all guessed, decides that maybe acting isn’t the only thing she could be good at. Littler’s illustrations work their magic here too – bringing the whole ensemble to life. Join Witch School here.


School for Little Monsters by Michelle Robinson and Sarah Horne
I do sometimes wonder where Michelle Robinson finds the time to write so many picture books, but here’s another one that ticks all the boxes. The book follows two children – Bob and Blob – one a human, one a monster – due to start their first days at school. But sadly for them, some naughty monsters have swapped signs and Bob and Blob attend the wrong schools. Rhyming text pulls the reader through this great mash-up of ‘experience’ and ‘monster’ genres, as the reader finds out about their first days at school. The rules for monsters and humans are apparently a little different. Great fun, superbly funny, colourful illustrations, with lots of mayhem. As with all great picture books, the illustrations speak louder than the words. The message is that school is good, as long as you’re at the right one…Be a little monster here.


An A to Z of Monsters and Magical Beings by Aidan Onn and illustrated by Rob Hodgson
Actually, this should probably be at the top of the pile, as the book very cleverly introduces and explains the different types of monsters, from aliens to zombies. Each letter takes a different ‘magical’ being, with a full double spread committed to it. There are plenty of wacky, although somewhat simply conceived, illustrations in matt, muted colours, accompanied by a small paragraph of text, which is more playful than it is informative. Learn the alphabet here.


Pretty by Canizales
A message in a book, this witchy picture book contribution to Halloween and beyond, is a story about a witch with a date, who wants to look her best. The creatures she meets on route give her hints as to how to better her appearance, but by the end of course, her date is disappointed with her new looks. Rather like wearing a little too much make up. The message is obvious – be yourself, but there’s also a rather dark twist at the end. The witch is brilliantly depicted – simplistic and rather lovingly drawn – despite her perceived failings, from hooked nose to pointy chin. Nice touches include her choice of outfits! Be pretty here. Happy Halloween!

Watch out too for my extract from Scarecrow by Danny Weston coming soon – for an ideal first horror book for your 11 year old (and up!)

Odd Socks by Michelle Robinson and Rebecca Ashdown

Odd Socks

If a bestselling book now turned into a Christmas Day prime time TV animation simply tells the story of a stick (Stickman by Julia Donaldson), then anything is possible in a picture book. Odd Socks is a love story between a pair of socks, told in rhyming couplets for young children (and sentimental adults). With spools of humour and no whiff of smelly socks, this is an adorable new addition to any picture book collection.

Suki and Sosh are a new pair of socks. Blue and white striped with a red heel and toe. Their characters are outlined from the beginning – content, happy, warm:

“Exactly,” said Sosh to his warm, woolly wife.
“A match made in heaven! Now, this is the life.”

The artworks extend the personification further. The room is bright, colourful in extremis – with a toy box bursting with personified toys, and brightly coloured knickknacks. The underwear drawer sports a pair of y-front pants with eyes and mouth – it’s not nearly as horrific as you might envisage – even the toy dinosaur betrays a friendly grin.

The brightness spills onto the ensuing pages, with adventures galore when the pair of socks adorn their small human – partaking in all sorts of activities such as accompanying the boy to the park by being worn in all sorts of shoes – jellies and wellies…. Until the day a hole appears in Suki’s big toe. A common problem for children who wear socks!

The comedy and tragedy begin – “Oh, darn it” they curse with a wry smile, although the tragedy of Suki’s growing hole is treated like a terminal illness. Dark days indeed. A villain comes on the scene to warn of impending doom:

“Big Bob was an old sock, a real winter woolly –
a loner, a moaner, a bit of a bully.
“I’ve seen it before with my first woolly wife –
that hole was the start of the end of her life.”

More hilarity for those adults reading aloud to the children – the socks are pictured discussing the quandary on a washing line – each sock with animated expressive faces, against a bright and cheery garden backdrop. Look out for the cat and dog! The illustrations are deceptively simple – squiggles and curves – but with just the right amount of white space in between the lush colours to give shape to the book.

The story continues – I shan’t ruin the excellent surprise ending – but the humour continues unabated from both author and illustrator – the use of the word ‘odd’ in particular, the search for missing socks and slippers including the deadly tumble dryer, and the dangers of the dog.

Children will adore the action scenes depicting the dog, as well as the abundance of colour depicting the craft materials and doodled shapes that dominate the end of the book.

It’s a love story, with domestic references to charm the whole family. The rhyming and scansion are perfect – the illustrations bright and cheery. This is a sharply observed well thought out picture book – there’s nothing woolly about it. It published in hardback this week – but it’s one of those you’ll want with a hard cover, in case, like the aforementioned sock – it develops defects from overuse! You can purchase your copy here.