Tag Archive for Sewell Anna

Escapism

“Fear unmans us. Fear degrades us. Fostering less fear—that’s your job and mine.”
― Philip Roth, Nemesis

Perhaps like me you’re oscillating between joy at having the children at home with their wonderful laughter, and an enormous paralysing anxiety about everything else. As I said last time, I’m finding it really hard to focus. Particularly on the reading and writing, which for me is profoundly unusual.

One solution however, is in finding a children’s book and reading it out loud to the children, or even to a partner, or a dog (failing any other willing listener). There’s something about reading a book out loud that forces the mind to concentrate more, to think about the expression one is putting into each phrase, to notice the difference in speech patterns between characters, to note the change in timeframe as a novel builds suspense or accelerates to a climax.


Currently we are reading Black Beauty by Anna Sewell to child three at bedtime – the novel a complete antithesis to our current situation. Actually intended for an adult audience, it is now firmly regarded as a children’s classic, and tells the story of a horse from the horse’s own point of view. Written in a time when horses were the primary means of road transport, Sewell offered a fictional story as a way of showing the population the price of animal cruelty, and how important it is to care for animals.

The book takes the form of showing Black Beauty’s life through its owners: some kind, some cruel; and there are many scenes of companionship among horses, as well as some dramatic episodes. The language is as sleek as a horse’s groomed mane, and although historical, there are signs of basic human kindness and community spirit that are terribly apt. Age 9+ years. You can buy this very beautiful hardback here or opt for a cheaper option by typing Black Beauty into the Waterstones home page.

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For some, the best antidote to anxiety is laughter. The Super Miraculous Journey of Freddie Yates by Jenny Pearson, illustrated by Rob Biddulph is snortingly chucklesome. It tells of fact-obsessed Freddy Yates, who is desperate to find his biological father, even if it means taking part in an onion-eating competition, a loo explosion, and donning a supergirl costume on national television. Although there’s pretty much a joke a page, there’s a serious undertone too, as Freddie learns the true meaning of friendship and family, and that maybe miracles can happen. We have never needed laughter and miracles so much. For age 9+. You can buy it here.


If you are after pure escapism, then look for Orla and the Serpent’s Curse by CJ Haslam. This fantasy adventure is written by The Sunday Times Chief Travel Writer (and he’ll be wanting to keep writing children’s books at this time). Publishing in a couple of weeks – you can pre-order and have something to look forward to – it is about Orla and her family who arrive in Cornwall for a relaxing holiday, only to discover that Orla may have uncovered an ancient curse. What’s more, their holiday cottage seems surrounded by a coven of elderly ladies, who do more than just flower arranging at church. With two brilliantly drawn brothers, and a family dog who has a large role to play, this mash up of the Famous Five’s adventures, folklore, witches and pirates is powerfully imagined, and deftly crafted. The dialogue between siblings is as good as in Catherine Doyle’s The Storm Keeper’s Island, and the book feels fresh and feisty. Age 10+ Pre-order here.


Lastly, for those who want to scare themselves silly in a completely different way, Crater Lake by Jennifer Killick is just the answer. For those Year Sixes who are missing out on their end of year residential, they’d do well to read this instead – it will make them feel relieved they didn’t have to go! From the moment a bloodstained man tries to stop their coach on route, to the lack of human activity when Lance and the rest of Year Six arrive at the Crater Lake activity centre, something doesn’t feel right about this school trip. Although there is horror here, (they must NOT fall asleep), and peculiar things happen, Killick is another children’s author who has managed to capture the particular politics and dynamics of a Year 6 class – from friendships and individual circumstances to loyalties and fears. Her dialogue is authentic, and there is more than a touch of well-placed humour. For ages 10+. You can buy it here.

With thanks to Firefly, Usborne, and Walker publishers for review copies.

Finding Black Beauty by Lou Kuenzler

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It was with some trepidation that I started reading Finding Black Beauty by Lou Kuenzler. It’s always hard to emulate a classic at the same time as rewriting it – you’re bound to deviate from the original in some way, change something that was inherently attractive about the original. But I was more than pleasantly surprised reading. The clue is in the title – rather than stick to the original point of view (Anna Sewell wrote Black Beauty from the horse’s point of view), Kuenzler has taken the vantage point of Josie, an aspiring groom, who takes a spirited black colt under her wing. It’s a bold and daring retelling – retaining the original plot but highlighting a minor-ish character and plunging him/her into the role of protagonist.

Yes, him/her was deliberate. Kuenzler purposely plays with gender in her re-telling, giving Josie a rather interesting Shakespearean-esque role, dressing as a boy to disguise her womanhood, because she has run away from home. This also lets Kuenzler bring in some excellent nuances into the story, such as dealing beautifully gently with Josie’s approaching puberty, (even though set in its original historical world, Kuenzler’s contemporary writing style and ability to write about such issues lends it modernity).

The only deviation from the original plot is when Josie becomes separated from Black Beauty. At this point it’s hard for Kuenzler to stick to the original, as she has to imagine what would have happened to Josie in the interim, and fill in Black Beauty’s progress in the story in less detail.

But overall, Kuenzler remains true to the original by keeping the focus firmly on horses, with details about horse care and riding, and most importantly by affording the reader empathy with the horses – this book is still very much about treatment of animals (and treatment of those less fortunate in society, or lower down on the class rungs, as well as gender equality). The reader still comes away with a deep love and affection for Black Beauty, and with tears in the eyes. A great retelling. I’m lucky enough to be able to gift you an extract – the first two chapters are below. If you like, then you can purchase the book here. Look out for the wonderfully presented hardback with silver foiling – a perfect gift.

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