Tag Archive for Wilson Kate

I Am the Seed: Kate Wilson Explores Choosing Poetry

I am the seed that grew the treeThis autumn a most beautiful poetry anthology for children is published. A collaboration between Nosy Crow and The National Trust, I Am the Seed That Grew the Tree contains 366 poems – a poem for every day of the year, including leap years. However, unlike other anthologies of poems for every day, these poems are thematically linked by nature. There’s the temptation to open immediately on one’s birthday, or an anniversary, but browsing through the book from start to finish gives a sublime impression of the impact of nature – from the illustrations of spring blossom through to the resplendent colour of summer flowers to the golden brown and orange glow of autumn leaves, pumpkins and bonfires.

Because along with full-colour illustrations throughout, the book has been published with unrestrained, lavish production – there is a ribbon marker, a cloth cover, and thick hardy pages. In fact, it lends an authority and feeling of treasure to this book, combining wonderful poems – a magnificent collection of old and new, a mix of songs and poems, haikus in translation, (although most are English language and reflect a UK heritage and representation of seasons and nature, like The Lost Words) – with exquisite inviting illustrations.

The poems in the collection include old favourites, giving comfort in their familiarity, but also less well-known poems, from 185 poets including Emily Bronte, Christina Rossetti, Thomas Hardy, Carol Ann Duffy and John Agard to name just a few, and all the poems are short and accessible.

The collection is aimed at any age because although the illustrations may be child-friendly and the poems short, the book carries a trusty authoritative air as a rich poetry resource. The full landscape illustrations with exquisitely detailed animals work alongside the poems to inspire both a feeling of wonder at the natural world around us, yet also a wonder of looking within ourselves to understand the possibility of ideas and feelings encompassed within a few rhythmic words.

I’m delighted to welcome Kate Wilson, Nosy Crow’s Managing Director, to MinervaReads to explain the process of selecting the poems:

Choosing the 366 poems for I Am The Seed That Grew The Tree was a joy! Fiona Waters drew on her amazingly rich knowledge of contemporary and classic poetry to come up with the core selection, and the editor, our head of picture books, Louise Bolongaro, and I continually bombarded her with things we found, and things we loved, and she incorporated them into her huge collection. We then began the challenging task of arranging them.

First of all, poems had to suit the season, and, more specifically, the month they were placed in: we had more poems about snow than we had potentially snowy days to use them in. Then, where we had more than one poem on a double page spread, we had to make sure that the poems were relatively short, so the words didn’t swamp the illustration, because the visual pleasure of this book is that it is illustrated not with little vignettes, but with big pictures, big swathes of colour. And we wanted to have a range of poems in close sequence, so that, if you read the book sequentially, simple poems sat together with more complex ones, newer poems nudged older ones, funny poems jostled up against solemn ones, and famous names accompanied less familiar voices.

This was a book that we published in collaboration with The National Trust, whose guardianship of natural spaces in England was an important value that we wanted to reflect. So we worked hard to ensure that, with a very few exceptions, the poems reflected nature that a child in the UK was familiar with: there are no poems about tigers or banyan trees in this book, but there are poems about hedgehogs and dandelions. This meant that the poetic tradition that the book drew upon most was primarily the English-language pastoral poetry tradition, and we had to work hard to balance this with voices from outside that tradition – poets of colour writing in English, and Yoruba, Native American and Japanese voices are included. We also sought to include many women poets, including Judith Nicholls, whose poem, Windsong, gave us the title of the anthology:

I am the seed

that grew the tree

that gave the wood

to make the page

to fill the book

with poetry.

 

We operated on the ‘Field of Dreams’ principle: if you build it, they will come – they, in this instance, being customers and readers. We compromised on no aspect of this book. Only around a third of the poems, for example, are out of copyright. We had to pay for the permission to include two thirds of the poems in the book, and some of the costs were high! Sometimes, in clearing permissions, we ran into unexpected problems. There’s no A A Milne in the book, because you can’t re-illustrate A A Milne’s poetry. And who knew that several of Emily Dickinson’s poems are still in copyright because they were published in the form in which we know them long after her death?

Right up to the last moment, we were shuffling poems around to get the best possible mix and sequence. I can say, hand on heart, that, in my experience a book has never been touched so lovingly by more hands as it was being made. We only hope that it will be touched lovingly by many hands now it is ready to meet its readers.

I Am the Seed That Grew the Tree is illustrated by Frann Preston-Gannon, poems selected by Fiona Waters, with an introduction by Kate Wilson. It is published by Nosy Crow in association with the National Trust, and you can buy a copy here.

 

FCBG Conference: Inspire

logo FCBG
Last weekend I attended the FCBG Conference. The FCBG aims to promote enjoyment in children’s books and accessibility of those books to all – as well as attempting to put the right book in the right child’s hands. The theme of the conference was ‘Inspire’ and I was inspired in three ways.
its about love

Firstly, by those who seek to examine fresh ways of looking at narrative in children’s publishing and what can be achieved. From the award-winning narrative apps, such as Jack and the Beanstalk, of Nosy Crow Publishers, presented by their supremely dynamic MD, Kate Wilson, to the spoken word artist Steve Camden (aka PolarBear), author of Tape and the soon to be published It’s About Love, who introduces his young adult novels with performance poetry. See here. In fact, understanding and being able to decode narrative is critical for a child’s development of empathy. And taking time to be engaged in a narrative and not be easily distracted can contribute to a child’s wellbeing. The writer Nicola Morgan explained that a big report on offline/online reading will be published in about 2017/2018, but that it is notable that reading offline does lend itself to fewer distractions. Everyone at the conference pointed to print books as an integral part of the narrative process as well as whatever other technologies we may apply. Books I’m looking forward to from Nosy Crow in the near future include There’s a Bear on My Chair by Ross Collins, the next in the Wigglesbottom Primary series by Pamela Butchart and Becka Moor, and My Brother is a Superhero by David Solomons. Reviews to follow.
Theres a Bear on my chair
Secondly, I was inspired by people working within the children’s publishing industry and others I met who are simply sharing their incredible book knowledge. Philip Ardagh is passionate about books and writes some startlingly funny ones. I’m hoping to review his book The Unlikely Outlaws soon, and he has also written a funny series called The Grunts, and Awful End. Sophy Henn and Rob Biddulph spoke about creating their picture books, PomPom Gets the Grumps and Blown Away respectively, which I’ve reviewed previously. Click on the titles to read my reviews. There was also much to learn about non-fiction titles, and I had a lovely chat with Nicola Davies who told me about her new theatre venture at the Hay Literary Festival. Nicola bubbles over with enthusiasm when speaking about her books, which weave a narrative structure within non-fiction to create spellbinding titles. One of my favourite titles of hers is The Promise, a picture book that seems to use osmosis to seamlessly transfer the author’s love for trees and nature onto the reader. Not only that but it imparts the idea that just because a child has a difficult start in life, it doesn’t mean that the rest of life will be equally difficult.

The Promise

Lastly of course, it is all about the power of the book; the power of the story to tell you that you are not alone, and as Frank Cottrell Boyce (author of The Astounding Broccoli Boy) put it “to break you free of the prison of the present”. Getting the right book into your own hands can inspire you in the same way that putting the right book in the hands of the right child can inspire them for life. Frank Cottrell Boyce revealed that simply reading Heidi empowered someone he knew to understand that happiness was a possibility for them despite all their hardship. On a lighter note, Steven Butler (author of The Wrong Pong) realised that reading might be for him after all when he realised that it was possible to put the word ‘knickers’ in a children’s book – he discovered it in Roald Dahl’s Revolting Rhymes!
the wrong pong

I came away with MORE knowledge about children’s books and subsequently a better idea of which books I can recommend for your child. It’s about getting children reading. You can access the FCBG website here.