Unexpected Delights: Picture Books With a Difference

the zoomers handbook

The Zoomers’ Handbook by Ana de Moraes, illustrated by Thiago de Moraes
A handbook not for zookeepers, nor for farmers, but for Zoomers – people who look after somewhat strange creatures. For example, the shicken, a creature who lays delicious eggs, but whose mouth rather resembles a shark, or the girafooster who wakes extra early and can spot the sun as soon as it begins to rise because of the girafooster’s height.

Each page in this extraordinary book features a different ‘creature’, and explains something about it. The endpapers of the book are field notes, so that the reader can identify the creatures’ feathers, poo, footprints etc.

The production of the book is not cheap – the thick paper makes it feel like a comprehensive guide rather than just a picture book, and the illustrations are hilarious in their ‘seriousness’ – no silly bright colours, but muted taupe, blues, beige, greys and yellows to fake authenticity.

A clever little picture book that inspires creative thinking, pushes the imagination, and is wonderfully playful in its presentation. As I said, something a bit different. You can purchase it here.

super happy magic forest

Super Happy Magic Forest by Matty Long
Swinging completely in the opposite direction with its colour palate – dark glasses potentially needed – is Super Happy Magic Forest. Even from the title, the (adult) reader can sense that this is a children’s book on the curb of Teletubbies and Magic Roundabout territory – definitely for children, yet with a whiff of tongue-in-cheek adult mind-bending too.

The magic crystals of life keep the forest super, happy and magic. (Bear with me). When they are stolen, five creatures from the forest including a puddle-disliking gnome, a faun and a frolicking unicorn, undertake a dangerous journey to Goblin Tower to retrieve them, passing on their way an army of dangerous penguins, a super creepy haunted forest and dungeons reminiscent of a retro computer game.

The enemy isn’t quite as anticipated though, and through several puns and overwhelmingly bonkers scenes, the crystals are finally replaced, and much frolicking can be done.

Quite the most mind-altering picturebook I’ve seen in a while, find it just for the pessimistic rabbit, or the butterfly’s prolonged death scene. Simply hilarious – I read it on the sofa with wine without the kids. Buy it here.

princess and the pony

The Princess and the Pony by Kate Beaton
Sophisticated readers adore progressive modern princesses, and that’s exactly what Kate Beaton has depicted here. Pinecone is no ordinary princess, she’s a warrior princess. The only problem is that she keeps receiving cosy sweaters as presents, and she doesn’t think that’s very warriorish. For her birthday she asks specifically for a fine warrior horse, but her parents give her a cute small farting pony. However, the pony turns out to be something of an asset, and Pinecone works out what to do with all those cosy sweaters.

The story above may not sound revolutionary – but taken with the illustrations, it’s phenomenally unique and fantastic. Beaton’s extraordinary style conveys the strength of warriors, doting parents, a pony who is positively the opposite of warrior, and a young girl’s initial despair and final triumph.

The scene with the Viking warrior battle is startling – quite exceptional in  a picture book – with masks, hot dogs, a cannon, tortoise man, Viking hats, tennis rackets, disguises – everything has gone into this illustration. It’s a sight to behold.

Very different, very funny, and yet with enormous heart. Recommended for all warrior princesses (and their princes). You can purchase it here.