We Are All Greta

Held up by many as a symbol of hope for the future, Greta Thunberg and her #ClimateStrikes have become a familiar occurrence. Children’s publishers have a difficult task – they need to promote worthy causes, and provide a moral standard, and yet also make money – they are businesses after all. To cash in on the Greta phenomenon seems like good business sense, but at the same time, they can inform children about climate change, and show them how to be their own individual force for good.

we are all gretaWe Are All Greta: Be Inspired to Save the World by Valentina Giannella, illustrated by Manuela Marazzi
This book was first published in April in Italy, and quickly sold out of its first print run of 10,000 copies. Now translated into English, We Are All Greta hits the bookshelves here. The book is actually less about Greta herself, and more about the science behind the climate crisis and the impact that the individual can have, once they have the knowledge behind them.

And this knowledge is provided in this wonderfully concise yet informative book, which explains how long the science about climate change has been around (since Fourier discovered that CO2 can warm the atmosphere and the surface of the planet in 1824!), and the important fact that the solutions are there, if only we would put them into effect.

Of course, much collaboration is needed – across countries – but Giannella is also quick to point out how each individual can help. This really is empowerment for youth – with this slim book children will have the facts at their fingertips to convince others of the climate emergency.

The book is divided into neat chapters: sustainable development, drinking water, waste, cities, biodiversity and much more. I was ‘green’ before I read this book, now I’m armed with knowledge and intent.

It also doesn’t provoke anxiety – some have been worried that teaching children about the devastating effects of climate change promotes anxiety in the young. Quite the contrary here – told in distinctly calm prose, it simply lays out the facts and provides insight for how to act. And much of the science and data is absolutely fascinating.

Illustrations appear between chapters – but there are three or four full pages of text to each chapter. For less able readers, I would recommend reading with an adult.

All in all an excellent and massively important resource. Save the world here. For other bloggers providing extracts and giving away copies, see the links below.

gretas story
Greta’s Story: The Schoolgirl who went on strike to Save the Planet by Valentina Camerini, translated by Moreno Giovannoni, illustrations by Veronica ‘Veci’ Carratello

This slim book is much more of a biography of Greta Thunberg. Of course, Greta is still only 16, and so readers might wonder what there is to learn about her so far. In fact, the book spends much time trying to explain how Greta negotiated and persuaded. For any children learning persusasive language as part of their primary school literacy curriculum, this book is quite an eye-opener. From having science and truthful information as evidence, to being able to use your voice in a powerful way and in the right places at the right times, the author talks about what makes Greta so successful in carrying her message. Of course there’s the impact of social media, but more than this the book highlights Greta’s determination, her resilience, and her passion, as well as her supportive family.

At the back, the book lists ways in which the reader can make a difference, and has a glossary of difficult words, but I imagine most readers will be able to learn about the power of an individual, and what that takes, just from reading Greta’s story. Be empowered here.

kids fight plastic
Kids Fight Plastic by Martin Dorey, illustrated by Tim Wesson
Veering away from Greta herself, but keeping very much on message is this lively and colourful little guide to fighting the scourge of plastic pollution. Subtitled, ‘How to be a #2minutesuperhero’, the book is written by the founder of the Global Beach Cleaning Movement, and he wants children everywhere to eschew plastic at home, school, and on days out, choosing alternatives instead. Packed with colour illustrations, and laid out with colourful boxes of text, cartoons, annotations and more, this delves deep into the anti-plastic revolution.

There’s information at the beginning about why plastic is harmful, then a handy and comprehensive guide to the different types of plastic, before some incredibly well thought-out and refreshing ideas on how to combat plastic – not just recycling or reusing a water bottle.

There’s fighting plastic at the park, at theme parks, at the cinema and more, as well as information on what we should really be flushing down the toilet and why, and the impact of washing clothes. There’s even a fight-plastic party. Each ‘mission’ is labelled with how many points children could accrue by achieving these plastic-fighting missions. Fight your superhero battle here.