Where People Live

Two very different books that show us the different extremes of who we are and how we live

How Cities Work by James Gulliver Hancock and Jen Feroze

This glorious non-fiction book will be a winner in any primary school classroom studying homes, geography or urban spread, as well as a firm favourite in households stimulating their children’s natural curiosity about the world in which we live.

It explores cities with cartoon illustrations, which probe how cities are born (expanding villages and towns) to the infrastructure behind walls and underneath feet. Encompassing transportation links and how they weave through cities, to ever-expanding housing, communities, working life and the essential infrastructure of sewerage, as well as highlighting the importance of green spaces, emergency services and a look at the possibilities of cities in the future.

Ingeniously designed with many cutaways so that the reader can peek inside windows, behind walls and under pavements, as well as ever expanding pages as the city grows – fold outs to show skyscrapers and the differences between nighttime and daytime on the street, there is clear thought to the paper and cardboard structure of the book, with an added emphasis on civic life, culture and recreation.

This isn’t a book that sets out to show real-life dimensions or true representations, but it gives a canny insight and hardcore information about urbanisation through cartoon-style illustrations. The reader can peek at figures as one would a real person through their lit window on a dark night. There are also quirky titbits of information, such as which was the first skyscraper, and how many weddings are conducted each year in New York City Hall. The text often points out something random for the reader to count or find too (cowboy hats for example).

The use of colour is clever too, lots of green when the city is viewed from the outskirts, and a shimmery green/grey of skyscraper windows up close. But the city never gets too grey – as in real life, humans add splashes of colour with their red fire engines, their green parks, the flashes of red and green on recreation grounds and deliveries of fruit to shops. Watch out for the urban wildlife too.

The narrative is engaging, speaking to the reader in second person, as well as inviting them to open flaps and discover what’s inside. An excellent guide to city infrastructure for 7+ years. You can buy it here.

A Village is a Busy Place by Rohima Chitrakar and V Geetha

And now for something completely different.

In the traditional Bengal Patua style of scroll painting, this book opens out, scroll like, to an intricate detailed and stylistically authentic depiction of the indigenous Santhal people and the everyday world of their native village.

Fold by fold, the colourful world is revealed. But cleverly, before the reader opens the fold, there is a small amount of easy-to-read text that points out illustrations that will be revealed in the next fold, things to look out for, and questions about what they’re seeing. For example, the first fold shows a wedding feast complete with a grand chair for the bride and musical instruments. Animals intermingle with the people, and there are some incidentals that will be fairly different for the Western reader: special knives, the dress, and storage vessels. There are traditional occupations here too, a woodcutter, farmers, hunters. A water pump shows how the villagers obtain their water.

Once read through, the book opens to its fullest extent, showing all the pages as one complete picture in an illustration like that portrayed on the cover. Here, sadly, the paper production lets it down slightly, and there’s clear glue residue from the fold, but other than that, this is a vibrant, detailed and mesmerising picture showing a way of life scarcely seen any more, as well as an artist’s picture worthy of any wall.

By looking in detail, the reader can create the narrative of village life themselves, seeing the part that each person plays, and what each day entails.

This is an enthralling and colourful way to learn about aspects of Indian village life, as well as being a good exploration of a traditional style of art – showing ways of seeing with an unusual design.

For readers of all ages, particularly age 6 years and above. You can buy the village here.