Tag Archive for Haworth-Booth Emily

Klaus Flugge Prize Shortlist: Kate Milner summarizes

klaus fluggeLast night the shortlist for the 2019 Klaus Flugge Prize was announced at Foyles, Charing Cross Road.

The Klaus Flugge Prize is awarded to the most promising and exciting newcomer to children’s picture book illustration, and the winner will be announced on 11 September.

This year the shortlist is all-female, and the books are particularly interesting for their mix of traditional themes of family and imagination with very modern commentary on the right to self-expression, and the structure of contemporary society.

More and more picturebooks are taking a stance with social and environmental messages. Here, last year’s winner, Kate Milner (My Name is Not Refugee) introduces the six shortlisted titles:

shortlist klaus flugge

The Extraordinary Gardener by Sam Boughton

Joe, the hero of this charming story, starts with a pip from an apple core and ends by greening the whole city; a message that feels very timely. The final fold-out spread is a riot of colour and life. There is so much to discover here, this is a city that anybody would love to live in. Sam Boughton has an extraordinary facility for turning apparently casual mark-making into glorious cityscapes as well as believable domestic interiors.

Looking after William by Eve Coy

This delightful book is a real evocation of the warmth and humour of family life. The little girl at the heart of the story has decided to look after her father for the day, and Eve Coy has caught the tone of a child mimicking the adults around her perfectly. The charming illustrations are full of empathy, generosity and wit. They really bring William, his little daughter, his cat, and their home to life in a way that will beguile parents as well as children.

The King Who Banned the Dark by Emily Haworth-Booth

It seems obvious that the way to make sure no one is ever afraid of the dark again is to keep the lights on all the time; but, of course, the citizens of Emily Haworth-Booth’s town soon start to miss the dark. There is so much invention and humour in this little yellow and black and white kingdom, from the rather troubling light inspectors to the light bulb hats worn by all the dogs. This book is a rollicking roller-coaster ride with some big themes and good jokes. The vibrant energy of the illustrations exactly match the funny, anarchic text.

I Can Fly by Fifi Kuo

Despite his best efforts, the young penguin at the centre of this story can’t fly but, with a little help from his father, he can swim. Fifi Kuo has beautifully captured this busy and determined little bird and the amazing landscape in which he lives. It truly feels freezing cold. The image of this little penguin lost in the vast, freezing ocean is chilling, and rather heart stopping. It is a relief when Dad comes to the rescue.

Julian is A Mermaid by Jessica Love

The little boy at the centre of this warm and delightful story is really a mermaid. Jessica Love has represented this little boy in the real world of trains and city streets, and the more colourful world of his day dreams, with such delicacy and tenderness. He springs to life on every page, and so do the vibrant characters around him. With the help of his wise and wonderfully drawn old Grandma, he does find his place among the mermaids.

Red And the City by Marie Voigt

The city that Marie Voigt has created for her Red Riding Hood to get lost in is, at the same time, wonderfully sinister and totally familiar.  This is a world of cash machines and advertisements and fast food; and, always lurking in the shadows, watching her, is the wolf. The reader is very glad that Red Riding Hood has her loyal and sensible little dog to keep her out of real trouble. Both are delightfully evoked. The imagery is simple but so eloquent about the thoughts and feelings of this intrepid pair.

The Light in the Dark

It’s the time of year when the days are getting longer, and the Christmas lights at teatime are just a memory. But with January weather in London, the evenings are still very dark. For some children (and adults), the darkness of winter brings sadness and even fear – dark can be scary for many – altering shapes in the darkness, the fumbling unknown of not being able to see, shadows springing unbidden. When I was little, I took great comfort in The Owl Who Was Afraid of the Dark by Jill Tomlinson, enjoying Plop’s discovery that other people like the dark for many different reasons. Dark was super, and kind, and exciting.

Four newer picture books aim to shine a light on the fear of darkness too. And they are all fantastic.

light in the night
The Light in the Night by Marie Voigt
Betty has no fear of the dark and enjoys bedtime for her bedtime stories. But when a Bear from one of her books comes to life, she must help him overcome his fear of the dark – and in turn he might help her too. On the surface, this is a simple book with adorable illustrations – a cuddly bear whose every expression shows on his face, a small intrepid child. And yet there is more depth – this is not just a book about conquering fears, making friends, or helping one another. The climax of the story draws out the notion that one has to try new things and this may entail showing incredible bravery in the face of darkness. Rewards come from adventure.

The ending is also particularly sweet and clever – the bear and Betty dance and sing back home; their fear masked by a togetherness in hope, and their shadows when they arrive home aren’t the scary shapeshifters of most fiction, but tall and proud elongated reflections. This pair have inner strength. Voigt’s illustrations feel animated – and each scene shows prescience in the story to come, as well as the character within. The pictures on Betty’s walls are of adventures, the bedtime book foreshadows the adventure she is to take, and the different illustrative perspectives of the woods show the reader when something familiar and normal can become scary and vice versa. Conquer your fears here.

the rabbit the dark and the biscuit tin
The Rabbit, the Dark and the Biscuit Tin by Nicola O’Byrne
A slightly different issue in this picture book with a lift the flap element, in that Rabbit just doesn’t want to go to bed. And if it doesn’t get dark, he won’t have to. So he traps the dark in a biscuit tin. The consequences, of course, are that Rabbit upsets a lot of other animals – the bats and owls and foxes. But the really excellent part of the book is the dialogue between Rabbit and the Dark, as the Dark tries to negotiate its way out of the tin. In the end, it’s Rabbit’s ability to empathise with others that makes him open the tin. This gradual awareness of the needs of others mirrors the development of a child – recognising others and feeling empathy for them.

O’Byrne cleverly uses her illustrations to mirror this point, highlighting Rabbit’s grumpiness and own desires with subtle use of ear positioning and body language, before the joy of doing things for others is shown all over Rabbit’s face.

The Dark is neatly personified in the illustrations too – a dark hand reaching out for a biscuit, but in the end the Dark is shown in its glory – it is necessary, and exciting, and rather wonderful. Open your own biscuit tin here.

elephant that ate the night
The Elephant that Ate the Night by Bing Bai, illustrations by Yuanyuan Shen
A not dissimilar theme in this Chinese tale of a dark mushroom forest and the night that grows over it at the end of every day. The baby animals are scared of being swallowed by the darkness, and invite Awu the elephant to swallow any lurking darkness himself. He does, and as he does, his stomach gets fuller, illustrated by a growing blackness across his grey skin. When he’s satisfied he pats his tummy and sleeps. But the animals soon realise that they need the darkness for sleeping, and they implore Awu to spit it back out.

The repetition of sounds and phrases make this a perfect bedtime read, and the quirkiness of the illustrations – the elephant’s pink toes, the colour palate of yellows and greys, the patterned trees and the animals’ teeth – make this stand out from the average picture book. It treads on the edge of fear, without being swallowed by it completely. Find your bravery in the shape of an elephant here.

king who banned the dark
The King Who Banned the Dark by Emily Haworth-Booth
This picture book came out earlier last year, and takes the premise of no darkness one step further. A prince who is afraid of the dark bans it completely upon becoming King, installing an artificial sun and enforcing anti-dark laws.

However, there is much more to this story than the fear of darkness. The King has to win over his people, persuading them why darkness is so terrible, and sustaining his argument. Manipulative marketing morphs to a slow brainwashing. But before long, the people start to revolt.

With pages that stimulate discussion on propaganda, and selling a story, as well as distortions of the truth, this is an up-to-the-minute picture book that deals with an age-old fear in a very modern way. It analyses what makes people happy, and how people can be manipulated to think they are happy with the way things are, as well as exploring freedom of speech, tyrannical rule, and of course, the power of darkness.

And the illustrations are different too – although almost all in shades of grey and yellow, there is careful thought behind light innovations – a lamp hat, the power of torches, an array of light shops, candelabra dripping with light – but also the scariness of the dark, the creeping shapes and shadows, the stealth behind cover of darkness, and also its magnificence. Buy your own princely beam of light here.